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Musta'li
The Musta‘lī (Arabic: مستعلي‎) are a sect of Isma'ilism named for their acceptance of al- Musta'li
Musta'li
as the legitimate nineteenth Fatimid caliph and legitimate successor to his father, al-Mustansir Billah. In contrast, the Nizari—the other living branch of Ismailism, presently led by Aga Khan
Aga Khan
IV—believe the nineteenth caliph was al-Musta'li's elder brother, Nizar
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Jihad
Jihad
Jihad
(English: /dʒɪˈhɑːd/; Arabic: جهاد‎ jihād [dʒɪˈhaːd]) is an Arabic
Arabic
word which literally means striving or struggling, especially with a praiseworthy aim.[1][2][3][4] It can have many shades of meaning in an Islamic context, such as s
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Taharah
Purity (Arabic: طهارة‎, Tahara(h)) is an essential aspect of Islam. (The same term taharah is also found in Hebrew—see tumah and taharah—applying to purity in Ancient Israel and modern Judaism also.) It is the opposite of najis, things which are considered ritually impure are in the state of najāsa.Contents1 In the Quran 2 Importance in Islam 3 Shia views on purity and impurity3.1 Majority views 3.2 Minority views4 Cleaning the teeth 5 Smoking 6 Sex 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksIn the Quran[edit] The Quran
Quran
says: "In it there are men who love to observe purity and Allah loves those who maintain purity."[Quran 9:108] and also there is one verse which concerned with Taharah or purity and impurity of Human as follow:"O you who believe! The polytheists are certainly impure[najas]: so let them not approach the Holy Mosque after thistheir year. And if you fear poverty, Allah will enrich you out of His grace, if He wishes
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Sawm
Sunni
Sunni
theological traditionsIlm al-KalamAsh'ari1 Maturidi Sunni
Sunni
Murji'ah Traditionalist2Shi'a Twelver3PrinciplesTawhid Adalah Prophecy Imamah QiyamahPracticesSalah Sawm Zakat Hajj Khums Jihad Commandin
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Hajj
The Hajj
Hajj
(/hædʒ/;[1] Arabic: حَجّ‎ Ḥaǧǧ "pilgrimage") is an annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca,[2] the holiest city for Muslims, and a mandatory religious duty for Muslims that must be carried out at least once in their lifetime by all adult Muslims who are physically and financially capable of undertaking the journey, and can support their family during their absence.[3][4][5] It is one of the five pillars of Islam, alongside Shahadah, Salat, Zakat
Zakat
and Sawm. The Hajj
Hajj
is the second largest annual gathering of Muslims in the world.[6] The state of being physically and financially capable of performing the Hajj
Hajj
is called istita'ah, and a Muslim
Muslim
who fulfills this condition is called a mustati
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Shuaib
Shuaib
Shuaib
(Arabic pronunciation: [ʃuʕajb]), Shoaib or Shuʿayb (Arabic: شُـعَـيْـب‎, šuʿayb, meaning "who shows the right path"), was an ancient Midianite Nabī (Arabic: نَـبِي‎, Prophet), sometimes identified with the Biblical Jethro (though Islam attributes to him many deeds not mentioned in the Bible). He is mentioned in the Quran
Quran
a total of 11 times.[2] He is believed to have lived after Abraham, and Muslims believe that he was sent as a prophet to a community: the Midianites,[1] who are also known as the Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
(Arabic: أَصْـحَـاب الْأَيْـكَـة‎,[3][4][5][6] "Companions of the Wood"), since they used to worship a large tree. To the people, Shuʿayb proclaimed the faith of Islam
Islam
and warned the people to end their fraudulent ways
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Nabi Shu'ayb
Nabi Shu'ayb
Nabi Shu'ayb
(also transliterated Neby Shoaib or Nabi Shuaib, meaning "the Prophet Shu'ayb") is a Druze
Druze
religious prophet, traditionally identified with the biblical Jethro, whose possible shrine/tomb is believed to be located near Kfar Zeitim, the depopulated Arab village of Hittin
Hittin
not far from Tiberias, Israel. The identification of Shu'ayb with Jethro, however, is a Druze
Druze
tradition rather than historical fact (see Shuaib). Prophet shu'ayb is the 14th prophet. Nabi Shuayb was an object of traditional veneration by Druze
Druze
through Palestine
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Zakat
Sunni
Sunni
theological traditionsIlm al-KalamAsh'ari1 Maturidi Sunni
Sunni
Murji'ah Traditionalist2Shi'a Twelver3PrinciplesTawhid Adalah Prophecy Imamah QiyamahPracticesSalah Sawm Zakat Hajj Khums Jihad Commandin
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Salah
Sunni
Sunni
theological traditionsIlm al-KalamAsh'ari1 Maturidi Sunni
Sunni
Murji'ah Traditionalist2Shi'a Twelver3PrinciplesTawhid Adalah Prophecy Imamah QiyamahPracticesSalah Sawm Zakat Hajj Khums Jihad Commandin
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Batin (Islam)
Bāṭin (Arabic: باطن‎) literally means "inner", "inward", "hidden", etc. The Quran, for instance, has a hidden meaning in contrast to its exterior or apparent meaning, the Zahir. Sufis believe that every individual has a batin in the world of souls. It is the inward self of the individual; when cleansed with the light of one's spiritual guide, it elevates a person spiritually.[1][2] This notion is connected to Allah's attribute of the Hidden One, who cannot be seen but exists in every realm. Muslim groups believe that batin[3] can be fully understood only by a figure with esoteric knowledge
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Pir (Sufism)
Pir or Peer (Persian: پیر‎, literally "old [person]", "elder"[1]) is a title for a Sufi
Sufi
master or spiritual guide. They are also referred to as a Hazrat or Shaikh, which is Arabic for Old Man. The title is often translated into English as "saint" and could be interpreted as "Elder". In Sufism
Sufism
a Pir's role is to guide and instruct his disciples on the Sufi
Sufi
path . This is often done by general lessons (called Suhbas) and individual guidance. Other words that refer to a Pir include, Murshid (Arabic: مرشد‎, meaning "guide" or "teacher"), Sheikh
Sheikh
and Sarkar (Persian word meaning Master, Lord)
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Esoteric Interpretation Of The Quran
Esoteric interpretation of the Quran, also known as Sufi interpretation and taʾwīl (تأويل), is the allegorical interpretation of the Quran
Quran
or the quest for its hidden, inner meanings. It was a synonym of conventional interpretation in its earliest use, but it came to mean a process of discerning its most fundamental understandings.[1] Esoteric interpretations do not usually contradict the conventional (in this context called exoteric) interpretations; instead, they discuss the inner levels of meaning of the Quran.[2] The words Ta'wil and Tafsir
Tafsir
have been translated to mean explanation, elucidation, interpretation, and commentary; but from the end of the 8th century onwards, 'ta'wil' was commonly regarded as the esoteric or mystical interpretation of the Quran, while the conventional exegesis of the Quran
Quran
was called "tafsir"
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Masyaf Castle
Masyaf
Masyaf
Castle (Arabic: قلعة مصياف‎) is located in the town of Masyaf
Masyaf
in Hama
Hama
Governorate, Syria, situated in the Orontes Valley, approximately 40 kilometers to the west of Hama. It served to protect the trade routes to cities further inland such as Banyas. The castle itself stands on a platform about 20 meters above the surrounding plain. The citadel became famous as the stronghold from which Rashid ad-Din Sinan, known as the Old Man of the Mountains ruled. He was a leader of the Syrian wing of the Nizari
Nizari
Hashshashin
Hashshashin
sect, also known as the Assassins, and a figure in the history of the Crusades. History[edit] Evidence suggests that the lower layers and foundations of the castle are of Byzantine origin.[1] Later levels were added by the Nizari Ismailis, Mamluks, and Ottomans
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Hassan-i Sabbah
Hassan-e Sabbāh (mistakenly Hassan-i Sabbāh Persian: حسن صباح Hasan-e Sabbāh) or Hassan as-Sabbāh (Arabic: حسن الصباح Ḥasan aṣ-Ṣabbāḥ) (circa 1050–1124)[1][2] was the leader of the Nizārī
Nizārī
Ismā‘īlītes and the founder of the order known as Assassins.[3] Assassins, who are often referred to as the Hashshashin, was a group of fedayeen.[4] Hassan-e Sabbāh was a missionary who converted the Nizari
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Assassins
Arabic Imam
Imam
or Grand MasterHassan-i_Sabbah Rashid ad-Din SinanParent organizationNizari Shia IslamAffiliations Nizari
Nizari
Ismaili state Part of a series on Shīa Islam Isma‘ilismConcepts


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