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Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
(/ˈmʌzlɪn/ or /ˈmjuːslɪn/[citation needed]), also mousseline, is a cotton fabric of plain weave.[1][2] It is made in a wide range of weights from delicate sheers to coarse sheeting.[2][3] They were imported into Europe from India in the 17th century and were later manufactured in Scotland and England
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First-aid
First aid
First aid
is the assistance given to any person suffering a sudden illness or injury,[1] with care provided to preserve life, prevent the condition from worsening, or to promote recovery. It includes initial intervention in a serious condition prior to professional medical help being available, such as performing CPR
CPR
while awaiting an ambulance, as well as the complete treatment of minor conditions, such as applying a plaster to a cut. First aid
First aid
is generally performed by the layperson, with many people trained in providing basic levels of first aid, and others willing to do so from acquired knowledge. Mental health first aid is an extension of the concept of first aid to cover mental health. There are many situations which may require first aid, and many countries have legislation, regulation, or guidance which specifies a minimum level of first aid provision in certain circumstances
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Cerebrovascular
Cerebrovascular disease
Cerebrovascular disease
includes a variety of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels of the brain and the cerebral circulation. Arteries
Arteries
supplying oxygen and nutrients to th
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Silent Film
A silent film is a film with no synchronized recorded sound (and in particular, no spoken dialogue). In silent films for entertainment, dialogue is conveyed by the use of muted gestures and mime in conjunction with title cards, written indications of the plot and key dialogue lines. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as film itself, but because of the technical challenges involved, the introduction of synchronized dialogue became practical only in the late 1920s in film with the perfection of the Audion amplifier tube
Audion amplifier tube
and the advent of the Vitaphone
Vitaphone
system
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Neurosurgery
orBachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery
Surgery
(M.B.B.S.) with Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons (F.R.C.S.)orMaster of Surgery
Surgery
(M.S.)or
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Aneurysm
An aneurysm is a localized, abnormal, weak spot on a blood vessel wall that causes an outward bulging, likened to a bubble or balloon.[1] Aneurysms are a result of a weakened blood vessel wall, and may be a result of a hereditary condition or an acquired disease. Aneurysms can also be a nidus for clot formation (thrombosis) and embolization. The word is from Greek: ἀνεύρυσμα, aneurysma, "dilation", from ἀνευρύνειν, aneurynein, "to dilate". As an aneurysm increases in size, the risk of rupture increases[2], leading to uncontrolled bleeding. Although they may occur in any blood vessel, particularly lethal examples include aneurysms of the Circle of Willis in the brain, aortic aneurysms affecting the thoracic aorta, and abdominal aortic aneurysms
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Set Construction
Set construction
Set construction
is the process undertaken by a construction manager to build full-scale scenery, as specified by a production designer or art director working in collaboration with the director of a production to create a set for a theatrical, film or television production. The set designer produces a scale model, scale drawings, paint elevations (a scale painting supplied to the scenic painter of each element that requires painting), and research about props, textures, and so on
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Beekeeping
Beekeeping
Beekeeping
(or apiculture) is the maintenance of honey bee colonies, commonly in man-made hives, by humans. A beekeeper (or apiarist) keeps bees in order to collect their honey and other products that the hive produces (including beeswax, propolis, flower pollen, bee pollen, and royal jelly), to pollinate crops, or to produce bees for sale to other beekeepers. A location where bees are kept is called an apiary or "bee yard." Depictions of humans collecting honey from wild bees date to 10,000 years ago.[2] Beekeeping
Beekeeping
in pottery vessels began about 9,000 years ago in North Africa.[3] Domestication is shown in Egyptian art from around 4,500 years ago.[4] Simple hives and smoke were used and honey was stored in jars, some of which were found in the tombs of pharaohs such as Tutankhamun
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Barmbrack
Barm Brack (Irish: bairín breac[1]), also called Barmbrack
Barmbrack
or often shortened to brack, is a yeasted bread with added sultanas and raisins.[2]Contents1 The loaf 2 Halloween
Halloween
tradition 3 Other references 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksThe loaf[edit] Usually sold in flattened rounds, it is often served toasted with butter along with a cup of tea in the afternoon. The dough is sweeter than sandwich bread, but not as rich as cake, and the sultanas and raisins add flavour and texture to the final product. In Ireland
Ireland
it is sometimes called Bairín Breac, and the term is also used as two words in its more common version
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Christmas Pudding
Christmas
Christmas
pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served as part of the Christmas dinner
Christmas dinner
in the UK, Ireland
Ireland
and in other countries where it has been brought by British emigrants. It has its origins in medieval England, and is sometimes known as plum pudding or just "pud",[1][2] though this can also refer to other kinds of boiled pudding involving dried fruit. Despite the name "plum pudding," the pudding contains no actual plums due to the pre-Victorian use of the word "plums" as a term for raisins.[3] The pudding is composed of many dried fruits held together by egg and suet, sometimes moistened by treacle or molasses and flavoured with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, and other spices
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Filter (chemistry)
Filtration
Filtration
is any of various mechanical, physical or biological operations that separate solids from fluids (liquids or gases) by adding a medium through which only the fluid can pass. The fluid that passes through is called the filtrate.[1] In physical filters oversize solids in the fluid are retained and in biological filters particulates are trapped and ingested and metabolites are retained and removed. However, the separation is not complete; solids will be contaminated with some fluid and filtrate will contain fine particles (depending on the pore size, filter thickness and biological activity). Filtration
Filtration
occurs both in nature and in engineered systems; there are biological, geological, and industrial forms
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Dressmaker
A dressmaker is a person who makes custom clothing for women, such as dresses, blouses, and evening gowns. Also called a mantua-maker (historically) or a modiste.Contents1 Notable dressmakers 2 Related terms 3 See also 4 ReferencesNotable dressmakers[edit]Cristóbal Balenciaga Pierre Balmain Coco Chanel Christian Dior David Emanuel Jean Muir, fashion designer (though she herself preferred to be called a dressmaker[1]) Anna and Laura Tirocchi, Providence, Rhode Island Isabel Toledo Madeleine Vionnet Charles Frederick WorthRelated terms[edit]Jean-Baptiste Jules Trayer, Breton seamstresses in a shop 1854). Prior to the Industrial Revolution, a seamstress did handsewing. Dressmaker
Dressmaker
denotes clothing made in the style of a dressmaker, frequently in the term dressmaker details which includes ruffles, frills, ribbon or braid trim
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James Gillray
James Gillray
James Gillray
(13 August 1756[1] or 1757[2] – 1 June 1815) was a British caricaturist and printmaker famous for his etched political and social satires, mainly published between 1792 and 1810. Gillray has been called "the father of the political cartoon", with his works satirizing George III, prime ministers and generals.[3] Regarded as being one of the two most influential cartoonists, the other being William Hogarth, Gillray's wit and humour, knowledge of life, fertility of resource, keen sense of the ludicrous, and beauty of execution, at once gave him the first place among caricaturists.[3][4]Contents1 Early life 2 Adult life 3 The art of caricature 4 Famous editions 5 Collecting 6 Gallery 7 Influence 8 References 9 Further reading9.1 Primary sources10 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born in Chelsea, London
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OCLC
OCLC, Inc., d/b/a OCLC[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio
Ohio
College Library Center, then became the Online Computer Library Center as it expanded. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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