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Music Genre
A music genre is a conventional category that identifies some pieces of music as belonging to a shared tradition or set of conventions.[1] It is to be distinguished from musical form and musical style, although in practice these terms are sometimes used interchangeably.[2][not in citation given] Recently, academics have argued that categorizing music by genre is inaccurate and outdated.[3] Music
Music
can be divided into different genres in many different ways. The artistic nature of music means that these classifications are often subjective and controversial, and some genres may overlap. There are even varying academic definitions of the term genre itself. In his book Form in Tonal Music, Douglass M. Green distinguishes between genre and form. He lists madrigal, motet, canzona, ricercar, and dance as examples of genres from the Renaissance period. To further clarify the meaning of genre, Green writes, "Beethoven's Op. 61 and Mendelssohn's Op
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Folk Music
Folk music
Folk music
includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s
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Frank Zappa
Frank Vincent Zappa[nb 1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American musician, composer, activist and filmmaker. His work is characterized by nonconformity, free-form improvisation, sound experiments, musical virtuosity, and satire of American culture.[2] In a career spanning more than 30 years, Zappa composed rock, pop, jazz, jazz fusion, orchestral and musique concrète works, and produced almost all of the 60-plus albums that he released with his band the Mothers of Invention and as a solo artist.[3] Zappa also directed feature-length films and music videos, and designed album covers. He is considered one of the most innovative and stylistically diverse rock musicians of his era.[4][5] As a self-taught composer and performer, Zappa's diverse musical influences led him to create music that was sometimes difficult to categorize
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Minimalist Music
Minimal music is a form of art music that employs limited or minimal musical materials
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Literary Fiction
Literary fiction is fiction that is regarded as having literary merit, as distinguished from most commercial or "genre" fiction. The term and distinction has been criticised by authors, critics and scholars, especially because a number of major literary figures have also written genre fiction, including John Banville, Doris Lessing, Iain Banks, and Margaret Atwood.Contents1 Definition 2 Characteristics 3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyDefinition[edit] Neal Stephenson
Neal Stephenson
has suggested that, while any definition will be simplistic, there is today a general cultural difference between literary and genre fiction. On the one hand, literary authors nowadays are frequently supported by patronage, with employment at a university or a similar institution, and with the continuation of such positions determined not by book sales but by critical acclaim by other established literary authors and critics
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Popular Fiction
Genre
Genre
fiction, also known as popular fiction, is plot-driven fictional works written with the intent of fitting into a specific literary genre, in order to appeal to readers and fans already familiar with that genre.[1] Genre
Genre
fiction is generally distinguished from literary fiction. Some writing may be considered both literary and genre, such as the science fiction writing of Nobel laureate Doris Lessing
Doris Lessing
and Margaret Atwood. Georges Simenon, the creator of the Maigret
Maigret
detective novels, has been described by André Gide
André Gide
as 'the most novelistic of novelists in French literature'.[2] The main genres are crime, fantasy, romance, science fiction, western, inspirational and horror
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Oral Tradition
Oral tradition, or oral lore, is a form of human communication where in knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another.[1][2][3] The transmission is through speech or song and may include folktales, ballads, chants, prose or verses. In this way, it is possible for a society to transmit oral history, oral literature, oral law and other knowledge across generations without a writing system, or in parallel to a writing system
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Richard Middleton (musicologist)
Richard Middleton FBA is Emeritus Professor of Music at Newcastle University in Newcastle upon Tyne. He is also the founder and co-ordinating editor of the journal Popular Music.Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Bibliography3.1 Author 3.2 Editor or co-editor4 External linksEducation[edit] Middleton studied at Clare College, Cambridge and at the University of York, where his PhD
PhD
was supervised by Wilfrid Mellers. Career[edit] Middleton previously taught at the University of Birmingham
University of Birmingham
and the Open University. He was appointed to his present position in 1998. In 2004 Professor Middleton was elected to a Fellowship by the British Academy. Middleton retired from his post at Newcastle in 2005. Bibliography[edit] Author[edit]Pop Music and the Blues: A Study of the Relationship and Its Significance. London: Gollancz, 1972. ISBN 0-575-01442-3. Studying Popular Music
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Sex Pistols
The Sex Pistols
Sex Pistols
were an English punk rock band that formed in London in 1975. They were responsible for initiating the punk movement in the United Kingdom and inspiring many later punk and alternative rock musicians. Although their initial career lasted just two and a half years and produced only four singles and one studio album, Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols, they are regarded as one of the most influential acts in the history of popular music.[1][2] The Sex Pistols
Sex Pistols
originally comprised vocalist Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
(John Lydon), guitarist Steve Jones, drummer Paul Cook
Paul Cook
and bassist Glen Matlock. Matlock was replaced by Sid Vicious
Sid Vicious
in early 1977. Under the management of impresario Malcolm McLaren, the band provoked controversies that captivated Britain
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Billie Holiday
Eleanora Fagan (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), better known as Billie Holiday, was an American jazz musician and singer-songwriter with a career spanning nearly thirty years. Nicknamed "Lady Day" by her friend and music partner Lester Young, Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz music and pop singing. Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. She was known for her vocal delivery and improvisational skills, which made up for her limited range and lack of formal music education.[2] After a turbulent childhood, Holiday began singing in nightclubs in Harlem, where she was heard by the producer John Hammond, who commended her voice. She signed a recording contract with Brunswick Records in 1935
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Public Service
Public service[1][not in citation given] is a service which is provided by government to people living within its jurisdiction, either directly (through the public sector) or by financing provision of services. The term is associated with a social consensus (usually expressed through democratic elections) that certain services should be available to all, regardless of income, physical ability or mental acuity. Even where public services are neither publicly provided nor publicly financed, for social and political reasons they are usually subject to regulation going beyond that applying to most economic sectors. Public policy[2][not in citation given] when made in the public's interest and motivations can provide public services. Public service is also a course that can be studied at a college or university
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Data Mining
Data
Data
mining is the process of discovering patterns in large data sets involving methods at the intersection of machine learning, statistics, and database systems.[1] It is an essential process where intelligent methods are applied to extract data patterns.[1][2] It is an interdisciplinary subfield of computer science.[1][3][4] The overall goal of the data mining process is to extract information from a data set and transform it into an understandable structure for further use.[1] Aside from the raw analysis step, it involves database and data management aspects, data pre-processing, model and inference considerations, interestingness me
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Co-occurrence
Co-occurrence or cooccurrence is a linguistics term that can either mean concurrence / coincidence or, in a more specific sense, the above-chance frequent occurrence of two terms from a text corpus alongside each other in a certain order. Co-occurrence in this linguistic sense can be interpreted as an indicator of semantic proximity or an idiomatic expression. Corpus linguistics and its statistic analyses reveal patterns of co-occurrences within a language and enable to work out typical collocations for its lexical items. A co-occurrence restriction is identified when linguistic elements never occur together. Analysis of these restrictions can lead to discoveries about the structure and development of a language.[1] See also[edit] Linguistics
Linguistics
portalCorrelation Distributional hypothesis Statistical semantics Co-occurrence matrix Co-occurrence networksReferences[edit]^ Kroeger, Paul (2005)
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Routledge
Routledge
Routledge
(/ˈraʊtlɪdʒ/)[2] is a British multinational publisher. It was founded in 1836 by George Routledge, and specialises in providing academic books, journals, & online resources in the fields of humanities, behavioural science, education, law and social science
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List Of Radio Formats
A radio format or programming format (not to be confused with broadcast programming) describes the overall content broadcast on a radio station
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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