HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Muscle Memory
Muscle
Muscle
memory has been used synonymously with motor learning, which is a form of procedural memory that involves consolidating a specific motor task into memory through repetition. When a movement is repeated over time, a long-term muscle memory is created for that task, eventually allowing it to be performed without conscious effort. This process decreases the need for attention and creates maximum efficiency within the motor and memory systems
[...More...]

"Muscle Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neuron
A neuron, also known as a neurone (British spelling) and nerve cell, is an electrically excitable cell (biology)cell that receives, processes, and transmits information through electrical and chemical signals. These signals between neurons occur via specialized connections called synapses. Neurons can connect to each other to form neural networks. Neurons are the primary components of the central nervous system, which includes the brain and spinal cord, and of the peripheral nervous system, which comprises the autonomic nervous system and the somatic nervous system. There are many types of specialized neurons. Sensory neurons
Sensory neurons
respond to one particular type of stimulus such as touch, sound, or light and all other stimuli affecting the cells of the sensory organs, and converts it into an electrical signal via transduction, which is then sent to the spinal cord or brain
[...More...]

"Neuron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Premotor Cortex
The premotor cortex is an area of motor cortex lying within the frontal lobe of the brain just anterior to the primary motor cortex. It occupies part of Brodmann's area 6. It has been studied mainly in primates, including monkeys and humans. The functions of the premotor cortex are diverse and not fully understood. It projects directly to the spinal cord and therefore may play a role in the direct control of behavior, with a relative emphasis on the trunk muscles of the body. It may also play a role in planning movement, in the spatial guidance of movement, in the sensory guidance of movement, in understanding the actions of others, and in using abstract rules to perform specific tasks
[...More...]

"Premotor Cortex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Motor Neuron
A motor neuron (or motoneuron) is a neuron whose cell body is located in the motor cortex, brainstem or the spinal cord, and whose axon (fiber) projects to the spinal cord or outside of the spinal cord to directly or indirectly control effector organs, mainly muscles and glands.[1] There are two types of motor neuron – upper motor neurons and lower motor neurons
[...More...]

"Motor Neuron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Synaptogenesis
Synaptogenesis is the formation of synapses between neurons in the nervous system. Although it occurs throughout a healthy person's lifespan, an explosion of synapse formation occurs during early brain development, known as exuberant synaptogenesis.[1] Synaptogenesis is particularly important during an individual's critical period, during which there is a certain degree of synaptic pruning due to competition for neural growth factors by neurons and synapses
[...More...]

"Synaptogenesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Angiogenesis
Angiogenesis
Angiogenesis
is the physiological process through which new blood vessels form from pre-existing vessels.[1][2][3] In precise usage this is distinct from vasculogenesis, which is the de novo formation of endothelial cells from mesoderm cell precursors,[4] and from neovascularization, although discussions are not always precise (especially in older texts). The first vessels in the developing embryo form through vasculogenesis, after which angiogenesis is responsible for most, if not all, blood vessel growth during development and in disease.[5] Angiogenesis
Angiogenesis
is a normal and vital process in growth and development, as well as in wound healing and in the formation of granulation tissue. However, it is also a fundamental step in the transition of tumors from a benign state to a malignant one, leading to the use of angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of cancer
[...More...]

"Angiogenesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Upregulated
In the biological context of organisms' production of gene products, downregulation is the process by which a cell decreases the quantity of a cellular component, such as RNA
RNA
or protein, in response to an external stimulus. The complementary process that involves increases of such components is called upregulation. An example of downregulation is the cellular decrease in the number of receptors to a molecule, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, which reduces the cell's sensitivity to the molecule. This is an example of a locally acting (negative feedback) mechanism. An example of upregulation is the response of liver cells exposed to such xenobiotic molecules as dioxin
[...More...]

"Upregulated" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dendritic Spines
A dendritic spine (or spine) is a small membranous protrusion from a neuron's dendrite that typically receives input from a single axon at the synapse. Dendritic spines serve as a storage site for synaptic strength and help transmit electrical signals to the neuron's cell body. Most spines have a bulbous head (the spine head), and a thin neck that connects the head of the spine to the shaft of the dendrite. The dendrites of a single neuron can contain hundreds to thousands of spines
[...More...]

"Dendritic Spines" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Motor Cortex
The motor cortex is the region of the cerebral cortex involved in the planning, control, and execution of voluntary movements. Classically the motor cortex is an area of the frontal lobe located in the posterior precentral gyrus immediately anterior to the central sulcus.Contents1 Components of the motor cortex1.1 The premotor cortex 1.2 The supplementary motor cortex2 History 3 The motor cortex map 4 Evolution of the motor cortex 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksComponents of the motor cortex[edit] The motor cortex can be divided into three areas: 1. the primary motor cortex is the main contributor to generating neural impulses that pass down to the spinal cord and control the execution of movement. However, some of the other motor areas in the brain also play a role in this function. It is located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface 2
[...More...]

"Motor Cortex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fine Motor Skills
Fine motor skill
Fine motor skill
(or dexterity) is the coordination of small muscles, in movements—usually involving the synchronization of hands and fingers—with the eyes. The complex levels of manual dexterity that humans exhibit can be attributed to and demonstrated in tasks controlled by the nervous system. Fine motor skills aid in the growth of intelligence and develop continuously throughout the stages of human development.Contents1 Types of motor skills 2 Developmental stages2.1 Infancy 2.2 Toddlerhood 2.3 Preschool 2.4 School age3 Common problems 4 Assessment 5 References 6 External linksTypes of motor skills[edit] Motor skills are movements and actions of the bone structures. Typically, they are categorized into two groups: gross motor skills and fine motor skills. Gross motor skills are involved in movement and coordination of the arms, legs, and other large body parts and movements
[...More...]

"Fine Motor Skills" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Erik Akkersdijk
Erik Akkersdijk
Erik Akkersdijk
(born 7 October 1989 in Enschede, The Netherlands) is a Dutch Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
speedsolver. In 2008, he set several Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
world records. He started cubing in August 2005. He is globally known as one of the best speedcubers in the world
[...More...]

"Erik Akkersdijk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parkinson's Disease
Parkinson's disease
Parkinson's disease
(PD) is a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system.[1] The symptoms generally come on slowly over time.[1] Early in the disease, the most obvious are shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, and difficulty with walking.[1] Thinking and behavioral problems may also occur.[2] Dementia
[...More...]

"Parkinson's Disease" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
Rubik's Cube
is a 3-D combination puzzle invented in 1974[1][2] by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik. Originally called the Magic
Magic
Cube,[3] the puzzle was licensed by Rubik to be sold by Ideal Toy Corp. in 1980[4] via businessman Tibor Laczi and Seven Towns founder Tom Kremer,[5] and won the German Game of the Year special award for Best Puzzle that year. As of January 2009[update], 350 million cubes had been sold worldwide[6][7] making it the world's top-selling puzzle game.[8][9] It is widely considered to be the world's best-selling toy.[10] On a classic Rubik's Cube, each of the six faces is covered by nine stickers, each of one of six solid colours: white, red, blue, orange, green, and yellow
[...More...]

"Rubik's Cube" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Speed Cubing
Speedcubing (also known as speedsolving) is the sport involving solving a variety of twisty puzzles, the most famous being the Rubik's Cube, as quickly as possible. For most puzzles, solving entails performing a series of moves that alters a scrambled puzzle into a state in which every face of the puzzle is a single, solid color. Some puzzles have different requirements to be considered solved, such as the Clock, for which all the dials must be moved into the 12 'o clock position.[1] The standard puzzle sizes are 2×2×2, 3×3×3, 4×4×4, 5×5×5, 6×6×6, and 7×7×7, although variations of the puzzle have been designed with as many as 33 layers, albeit not mass-produced for the public.[2] There are also different shapes of the famous puzzles, including Pyraminx, Megaminx, Skewb, and Square-1. The world record for a single 3x3x3 solve is 4.59 seconds, set by SeungBeom Cho and Feliks Zemdegs at the ChicaGhosts 2017 and Hobart Summer 2018 competitions, respectively
[...More...]

"Speed Cubing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Algorithm
In mathematics and computer science, an algorithm (/ˈælɡərɪðəm/ ( listen) AL-gə-ridh-əm) is an unambiguous specification of how to solve a class of problems. Algorithms can perform calculation, data processing and automated reasoning tasks. An algorithm is an effective method that can be expressed within a finite amount of space and time[1] and in a well-defined formal language[2] for calculating a function.[3] Starting from an initial state and initial input (perhaps empty),[4] the instructions describe a computation that, when executed, proceeds through a finite[5] number of well-defined successive states, eventually producing "output"[6] and terminating at a final ending state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as randomized algorithms, incorporate random input.[7] The concept of algorithm has existed for centuries and the use of the concept can be ascribed to Greek mathematicians, e.g
[...More...]

"Algorithm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pocket Cube
The Pocket Cube
Pocket Cube
(also known as the Mini Cube) is the 2×2×2 equivalent of a Rubik's Cube. The cube consists of 8 pieces, all corners.Contents1 History 2 Permutations 3 Methods 4 World records4.1 Top 5 solvers by single solve 4.2 Top 5 solvers by average of 5 solves5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Solved versions of, from left to right: original Pocket Cube, Eastsheen cube, V-Cube 2, V-Cube 2b.In March 1970, Larry D. Nichols
Larry D. Nichols
invented a 2×2×2 "Puzzle with Pieces Rotatable in Groups" and filed a Canadian patent application for it. Nichols's cube was held together with magnets. Nichols was granted U.S. Patent
Patent
3,655,201 on April 11, 1972, two years before Rubik invented his Cube. Nichols assigned his patent to his employer Moleculon Research Corp., which sued Ideal in 1982. In 1984, Ideal lost the patent infringement suit and appealed
[...More...]

"Pocket Cube" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.