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Scotland

The head of state of the United Kingdom is the monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II (since 1952). The monarchy of the United Kingdom continues to use a variety of styles, titles and other royal symbols of statehood specific to pre-union Scotland, including: the Royal Standard of Scotland, the Royal coat of arms used in Scotland together with its associated Royal Standard, royal titles including that of Duke of Rothesay, certain Great Officers of State, the chivalric Order of the Thistle and, since 1999, reinstating a ceremonial role for the Crown of Scotland after a 292-year hiatus.[191] Elizabeth II's regnal numbering caused controversy in 1953 because there had never been an Elizabeth I in Scotland
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Merchant Company Of Edinburgh
The Royal Company of Merchants of the City of Edinburgh, also known as the Merchant Company of Edinburgh or just the Merchant Company, is a company or society with a Royal Charter from 1681, but dating back to at least 1260. The Company or Confraternity was created to protect trading rights of the merchants of the royal burgh of Edinburgh. It also carries out a significant amount of charitable and educational work. Along with the Incorporated Trades it is one of the Guilds of the City of Edinburgh. The company historically formed part of the now defunct Corporation of the City of Edinburgh. Edinburgh has a long history as a trading city. Prior to the Reformation there was a Guild of Merchants in the city. However, there was a great rivalry between the Merchants and the craftsmen of the city, the latter forming the Incorporated Trades in the early 16th century
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Blackhall, Edinburgh

Blackhall is a suburb in the north west of the Scottish capital city Edinburgh. According to Stuart Harris in The Place Names Of Edinburgh the "Black-" in the placename could derive either from the Anglian blaec or Scots blac meaning simply black, and the "-hall" ending is from the Anglian halh or Scots haugh meaning land beside or in the bend of a river. Blackhall is a mainly residential area with amenities including a library and a small number of shops. Most of the housing in the neighbourhood was constructed in the inter-war period, although the recent housing boom has seen new development on the north east slope of Corstorphine Hill. This development went ahead despite considerable opposition from the local community and an unusual planning quirk which allowed the development to go ahead based on forty-year-old outline permission.[
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