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Municipal Clerk
A clerk is a senior official of many municipal governments in the English-speaking world. In some communities, including most in the United States, the position is elected, but in many others, the clerk is appointed to their post. In almost all cases, the actual title of the clerk reflects the type of municipality he or she works for, thus, instead of simply being known as the clerk, the position is generally referred to as the town clerk, township clerk, city clerk, village clerk, borough clerk, board secretary, or county clerk. Other titles also exist. The office has existed for centuries, though in some places it is now being merged with other positions. The duties of a municipal clerk vary even more than their titles. Particularly in the United States, it is difficult to fully describe a clerk's duties, because there are hundreds of different jobs a clerk may fulfill. In some U.S
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Municipal Government
A municipality is usually a single urban or administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction as granted by national and state laws to which it is subordinate
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New England Town
The New England town (generally referred to simply as a town in New England) is the basic unit of local government and local division of state authority in each of the six New England states and without a direct counterpart in most other U.S. states. New England towns overlay the entire area of a state, similar to civil townships in other states where they exist, but they are fully functioning municipal corporations, possessing powers similar to cities in other states. New Jersey's system of equally powerful townships, boroughs, towns, and cities is the system which is most similar to that of New England. New England towns are often governed by a town meeting legislative body
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100

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Agenda (meeting)
An agenda is a list of meeting activities in the order in which they are to be taken up, beginning with the call to order and ending with adjournment. It usually includes one or more specific items of business to be acted upon. It may, but is not required to, include specific times for one or more activities. An agenda may also be called a docket, schedule, or calendar
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Minutes
Minutes, also known as minutes of meeting (abbreviation MoM), protocols or, informally, notes, are the instant written record of a meeting or hearing
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California
Native languages as of 2007
  • Spanish 28.5%
  • Chinese 2.8%
  • Filipino 2.2%
  • --->
    Demonym Californian
    Capital Sacramento
    Largest city Los Angeles
    Largest metro Los Angeles Area">Greater Los Angeles Area
    Area Ranked 3rd
     • Total 163,696 sq mi
    (423,970 km2--->)
     • Width 250 miles (400 km)
     • Length 770 miles (1,240 km)
     • % water 4.7
     • Latitude 32°32′ N to 42° N
     • Longitude 114°8′ W to 124°26′ W
    Population Ranked 1st
     • Total 39,536,653 (2017 est.)
     • Density 240/sq mi  (92.6/km2--->)
    Ranked 11th
     • Median household income $63,636 (13th)

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    Illinois
    Illinois (/ˌɪlɪˈnɔɪ/ (About this sound listen) IL-ih-NOY) is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States. It is the 6th most populous state and 25th largest state in terms of land area, and is often noted as a microcosm of the entire country. With Chicago in the northeast, small industrial cities and great agricultural productivity in central and northern Illinois, and natural resources like coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois has a diverse economic base and is a major transportation hub
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    Civil Township
    A civil township is a widely used unit of local government in the United States, subordinate to a County (United States)">county. The term town is used in New England town">New England, Political subdivisions of New York State">New York, and Wisconsin to refer to the equivalent of the civil township in these states. Specific responsibilities and the degree of autonomy vary based on each state. Civil townships are distinct from survey townships, but in states that have both, the boundaries often coincide and may completely geographically subdivide a county. The U.S. Census Bureau classifies civil townships as minor civil divisions. Currently, there are 20 states with civil townships. Township functions are generally overseen by a governing board (the name varies from state to state) and a clerk or trustee
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    Massachusetts
    Massachusetts (/ˌmæsəˈsɪts/ (About this soundlisten), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. It borders on the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area, and is one of the original thirteen states. The capital of Massachusetts is Boston, which is also the most populous city in New England
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    Wig
    A wig is a head covering made from human hair, animal hair, or synthetic fiber. The word wig is short for periwig and first appeared in the English language around 1675.

    Mandatory Retirement
    Mandatory retirement also known as enforced retirement, is the set age at which people who hold certain jobs or offices are required by industry custom or by law to leave their employment, or retire.

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    New York State
    New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017, it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island. The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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    Town (New York)
    The administrative divisions of New York are the various units of government that provide local government services in the state of New York. The state is divided into counties, cities, towns, and villages
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    New York Constitution
    The Constitution of the State of New York establishes the structure of the government of the State of New York, and enumerates the basic rights of the citizens of New York. Like most state constitutions in the United States, New York's constitution's provisions tend to be more detailed, and amended more often than its federal counterpart. Because the history of the state constitution differs from the federal constitution, the New York Court of Appeals has seen fit to interpret analogous provisions differently from United States Supreme Court's interpretation of federal provisions. New York State has held nine Constitutional Conventions: in 1776–1777, 1801, 1821, 1846, 1867–1868, 1894, 1915, 1938, and 1967; a Constitutional Commission in 1872–1873; and a Judicial Convention in 1921
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