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Municipal Clerk
A clerk is a senior official of many municipal governments in the English-speaking world. In some communities, including most in the United States, the position is elected, but in many others, the clerk is appointed to their post. In almost all cases, the actual title of the clerk reflects the type of municipality he or she works for, thus, instead of simply being known as the clerk, the position is generally referred to as the town clerk, township clerk, city clerk, village clerk, borough clerk, board secretary, or county clerk. Other titles also exist. The office has existed for centuries, though in some places it is now being merged with other positions. The duties of a municipal clerk vary even more than their titles. Particularly in the United States, it is difficult to fully describe a clerk's duties, because there are hundreds of different jobs a clerk may fulfill. In some U.S
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Municipal Government
A municipality is usually a single urban or administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction as granted by national and state laws to which it is subordinate
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New England Town
New England
New England
(United States):Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island VermontFound in U.S. states in New EnglandCreated by Various colonial agreements followed by state constitutionsCreated 1620 (Plymouth, Massachusetts)Number More than 1,500 (as of 2016)Populations 41 (Hart's Location, New Hampshire) - 68,318 (Framingham, Massachusetts)Areas 1.2 sq mi. (Nahant, Massachusetts) - 291.2 sq mi. (Pittsburg, New Hampshire)Government Town meetingThis article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article possibly contains original research
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Agenda (meeting)
An agenda is a list of meeting activities in the order in which they are to be taken up, beginning with the call to order and ending with adjournment. It usually includes one or more specific items of business to be acted upon. It may, but is not required to, include specific times for one or more activities. An agenda may also be called a docket, schedule, or calendar. It may also contain a listing of an order of business.Contents1 Etymology 2 Explanation 3 Order of business3.1 Standard Order of Business 3.2 Optional headings4 Call for the orders of the day 5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit]Look up agenda in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Agenda is an abbreviation of agenda sunt or agendum est, gerundive forms in plural and singular respectively of the Latin verb ago, agere, egi, actum "to drive on, set in motion", for example of cattle.[1] The meaning is "(those things/that thing) which must be driven forward"
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Minutes
Minutes, also known as minutes of meeting (abbreviation MoM), protocols or, informally, notes, are the instant written record of a meeting or hearing. They typically describe the events of the meeting and may include a list of attendees, a statement of the issues considered by the participants, and related responses or decisions for the issues.Contents1 Creation 2 Purpose 3 Format 4 See also 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 Sources6 Further readingCreation[edit] Minutes
Minutes
may be created during the meeting by a typist or court reporter, who may use shorthand notation and then prepare the minutes and issue them to the participants afterwards. Alternatively, the meeting can be audio recorded, video recorded, or a group's appointed or informally assigned secretary may take notes, with minutes prepared later
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California
Native languages as of 2007English 57.4%[2] Spanish 28.5%[3] Chinese 2.8%[3] Filipino 2.2%[3]Demonym CalifornianCapital SacramentoLargest city Los AngelesLargest metro Greater Los Angeles
Los Angeles
AreaArea Ranked 3rd • Total 163,696 sq mi (423,970 km2) • Width 250 miles (400 km) • Length 770 miles (1,240 km) • % water 4.7 • Latitude 32°32′ N to 42° N • Longitude 114°8′ W to 124°26′ W
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Illinois
Illinois
Illinois
(/ˌɪlɪˈnɔɪ/ ( listen) IL-ih-NOY) is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States. It is the 6th most populous state and 25th largest state in terms of land area, and is often noted as a microcosm of the entire country.[7] With Chicago
Chicago
in the northeast, small industrial cities and great agricultural productivity in central and northern Illinois, and natural resources like coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois
Illinois
has a diverse economic base and is a major transportation hub. The Port of Chicago connects the state to other global ports from the Great Lakes, via the Saint Lawrence Seaway, to the Atlantic Ocean, as well as the Great Lakes to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River, via the Illinois Waterway
Illinois Waterway
on the Illinois
Illinois
River
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Civil Township
A civil township is a widely used unit of local government in the United States, subordinate to a county. The term town is used in New England, New York, and Wisconsin
Wisconsin
to refer to the equivalent of the civil township in these states. Specific responsibilities and the degree of autonomy vary based on each state. Civil townships are distinct from survey townships, but in states that have both, the boundaries often coincide and may completely geographically subdivide a county. The U.S. Census Bureau
U.S. Census Bureau
classifies civil townships as minor civil divisions. Currently, there are 20 states with civil townships. Township
Township
functions are generally overseen by a governing board (the name varies from state to state) and a clerk or trustee. Township officers frequently include justice of the peace, road commissioner, assessor, constable, and surveyor
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Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
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Vital Record
Vital records are records of life events kept under governmental authority, including birth certificates, marriage licenses, and death certificates. In some jurisdictions, vital records may also include records of civil unions or domestic partnerships. In the United States, vital records are typically maintained at both the county[1] and state levels.[2] In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and numerous other countries vital records are recorded in the civil registry. Various European countries are members of an International Commission on Civil Status which provides a mutually recognized convention on the coding of entries appearing in civil status documents, with common codes and translation tables between the language of the member states
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Wig
A wig is a head covering made from human hair, animal hair, or synthetic fiber. The word wig is short for periwig and first appeared in the English language around 1675.[citation needed] Some people wear wigs to disguise baldness; a wig may be used as a less intrusive and less expensive alternative to medical therapies for restoring hair.Contents1 History1.1 Ancient use 1.2 16th and 17th centuries 1.3 18th century 1.4 19th and 20th centuries2 Military wigs 3 Merkin 4 Current usage4.1 Image gallery5 Manufacture5.1 Measurement 5.2 Foundation 5.3 Hair preparation 5.4 Adding the hair 5.5 Styling 5.6 Fitting 5.7 Types of human hair wigs6 Notable wig designers 7 See also 8 References 9 Further readingHistory[edit] Ancient use[edit] In Egyptian society men and women commonly had clean shaven or close cropped hair and often wore wigs.[1][2] The ancient Egyptians created the wig to shield shaved, hairless heads from the sun
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Mandatory Retirement
Mandatory retirement also known as enforced retirement, is the set age at which people who hold certain jobs or offices are required by industry custom or by law to leave their employment, or retire.Contents1 Rationale 2 Countries2.1 Australia 2.2 Brazil 2.3 Canada 2.4 United Kingdom 2.5 United States2.5.1 Professions3 Religions3.1 Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church 3.2 Anglican Communion4 See also 5 ReferencesRationale[edit] Typically, mandatory retirement is justified by the argument that certain occupations are either too dangerous (military personnel) or require high levels of physical and mental skill (air traffic controllers, airline pilots)
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New York State
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Town (New York)
The administrative divisions of New York are the various units of government that provide local government services in the state of New York. The state is divided into counties, cities, towns, and villages. Cities, towns and villages are municipal corporations with their own governments that provide most local government services.[1] Whether a municipality is defined as a city, town, or village is dependent not on population or land area, but rather on the form of government selected by the residents and approved by the state legislature.[2][3][4] Each such government is granted varying home rule powers as provided by the New York Constitution.[5] New York has various corporate entities that serve single purposes that are also local governments, such as school and fire districts.[5] New York has 62 counties,[6][7] which are subdivided into 932 towns[4] and 62 cities;[3] it also has 10 Indian reservations.[8] In total, the state has more than 3,400 active local governments and more than
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New York Constitution
The Constitution of the State of New York
State of New York
establishes the structure of the government of the State of New York, and enumerates the basic rights of the citizens of New York. Like most state constitutions in the United States, New York's constitution's provisions tend to be more detailed, and amended more often than its federal counterpart. Because the history of the state constitution differs from the federal constitution, the New York Court of Appeals
New York Court of Appeals
has seen fit to interpret analogous provisions differently from United States
United States
Supreme Court's interpretation of federal provisions. New York State has held nine Constitutional Conventions: in 1776–1777, 1801, 1821, 1846, 1867–1868, 1894, 1915, 1938, and 1967; a Constitutional Commission in 1872–1873; and a Judicial Convention in 1921
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