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Municipal Borough Of Acton
ACTON was a local government district in Middlesex
Middlesex
, England
England
from 1865 to 1965. CONTENTS * 1 Formation * 2 Coat of arms
Coat of arms
* 3 Later history * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links FORMATIONIn 1865 the Local Government Act 1858 was adopted by the parish of Acton , and a twelve-member local board of health was formed to govern the area. The Local Government Act 1894 constituted the area an urban district , and an urban district council of fifteen councillors replaced the local board. The number of councillors was increased to sixteen in 1906. In 1921 the town was granted a charter of incorporation to become a municipal borough . The borough council consisted of a mayor , six aldermen and twenty-four councillors. COAT OF ARMSOn incorporation in 1921 the borough was granted a coat of arms by the College of Arms . The shield featured an oak tree and the crest a branch of oak, both in reference to the derivation of the name "Acton" from "Oak Town". At the top of the shield were the arms of Middlesex County Council between an open book and a cogwheel for education and industry in the borough respectively
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London Borough Of Ealing
Leader & Cabinet - Cllr Julian Bell Chief Executive - Paul Najsarek (Labour ) • MAYOR Cllr Patricia Walker • LONDON ASSEMBLY Onkar Sahota AM for Ealing
Ealing
and Hillingdon • MPS Stephen Pound Rupa Huq Virendra Sharma • EU PARLIAMENT London
London
AREA • TOTAL 55.53 km2 (21.44 sq mi) AREA RANK 265th (of 326) POPULATION (MID-2016 EST.) • TOTAL 343,200 • RANK 17th (of 326) • DENSITY 6,200/km2 (16,000/sq mi) • ETHNICITY 30.4% White British 3.1% White Irish 0.1% White Gypsy or Irish Traveller 15.4% Other White 1.2% White & Black Caribbean 0.6% White & Black African 1.4% White "> Ealing
Ealing
is also the primary setting for The Sarah Jane Adventures , being the location of Sarah Jane Smith 's home. Within the borough are two garden suburbs, Brentham Garden Suburb and Bedford Park . 330 hectares within the borough are designated as part of the Metropolitan Green Belt
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Local Board Of Health
LOCAL BOARDS or LOCAL BOARDS OF HEALTH were local authorities in urban areas of England and Wales
England and Wales
from 1848 to 1894. They were formed in response to cholera epidemics and were given powers to control sewers, clean the streets, regulate environmental health risks including slaughterhouses and ensure the proper supply of water to their districts. Local boards were eventually merged with the corporations of municipal boroughs in 1873, or became urban districts in 1894. CONTENTS* 1 Public Health Act 1848 * 1.1 General Board of Health * 1.2 Forming a local board of health * 1.3 Membership of a local board * 1.4 Powers of a local board * 2 Local Government Act 1858 * 2.1 The Local Government Act Office and the Local Government Board * 2.2 Constituting local boards * 2.3 Additional powers * 3 Number of local boards * 4 Sanitary districts and urban districts * 5 See also * 6 Sources * 7 Notes PUBLIC HEALTH ACT 1848The first local boards were created under the PUBLIC HEALTH ACT 1848 (11 sewerage; drainage; cleansing; paving, and environmental health regulation under a single local body. The act could be applied to any place in England and Wales
England and Wales
except the City of London
City of London
and some other areas in the Metropolis already under the control of sewer commissioners
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Urban District (Great Britain And Ireland)
In England and Wales , Northern Ireland , and the Republic of Ireland , an URBAN DISTRICT was a type of local government district that covered an urbanised area. Urban districts had an elected URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL (UDC), which shared local government responsibilities with a county council . ENGLAND AND WALESIn England and Wales , urban districts and rural districts were created in 1894 (by the Local Government Act 1894 ) as subdivisions of administrative counties . They replaced the earlier system of urban and rural sanitary districts (based on poor law unions ) the functions of which were taken over by the district councils. The district councils also had wider powers over local matters such as parks, cemeteries and local planning. An urban district usually contained a single parish , while a rural district might contain many. Urban districts were considered to have more problems with public health than rural areas, and so urban district councils had more funding and powers than comparable rural districts. Urban districts usually covered smaller towns, usually with populations of less than 30,000. Originally there were 1013 urban districts. Under the Local Government Act 1929 206 urban districts were abolished. Many were merged with surrounding rural districts, and so many urban districts often covered some rural areas as well
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Municipal Borough
MUNICIPAL BOROUGHS were a type of local government district which existed in England and Wales between 1835 and 1974, in Northern Ireland from 1840 to 1973 and in the Republic of Ireland from 1840 to 2002. Broadly similar structures existed in Scotland from 1833 to 1975 with the reform of royal burghs and creation of police burghs . CONTENTS* 1 England and Wales * 1.1 Municipal Corporations Act 1835 * 1.2 Corporation and council * 1.2.1 Town councils * 1.3 County and non-county boroughs * 1.4 Abolition * 2 Ireland 1840–1922 * 3 Northern Ireland * 4 Irish Free State and the Republic of Ireland * 5 See also * 6 References ENGLAND AND WALESMUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS ACT 1835Boroughs had existed in England and Wales since mediæval times. By the late Middle Ages they had come under royal control, with corporations established by royal charter . These corporations were not popularly elected: characteristically they were self-selecting oligarchies , were nominated by tradesmen's guilds or were under the control of the lord of the manor . A Royal Commission was appointed in 1833 to investigate the various borough corporations in England and Wales. In all 263 towns were found to have some form of corporation created by charter or in existence by prescription
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Civil Parish
In England, a CIVIL PARISH is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties , or their combined form, the unitary authority . It is an administrative parish , in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish . A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch . Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council . Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish. As of 31 December 2015 there were 10,449 parishes in England. On 1 April 2014, Queen\'s Park became the first civil parish in Greater London . Before 2008 their creation was not permitted within a London borough
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Motto
Heraldry
Heraldry
portal * v * t * e A MOTTO (derived from the Latin
Latin
_muttum_, 'mutter', by way of Italian _motto_, 'word', 'sentence') is a maxim , a phrase meant to formally summarize the general motivation or intention of an individual, family, social group or organization. Mottos are usually not expressed verbally, unlike slogans , but are expressed in writing and usually stem from long traditions of social foundations, or also from significant events, such as a civil war or a revolution. A motto may be in any language, but Latin
Latin
has been widely used, especially in the Western world. CONTENTS * 1 Heraldry
Heraldry
* 2 Literature * 3 See also * 4 References HERALDRYIn heraldry , a motto is often depicted below the shield in a banderole ; this placement stems from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
, in which the vast majority of nobles possessed a coat of arms and a motto. In the case of Scottish heraldry it is mandated to appear above the crest. Spanish coats of arms may display a motto in the bordure of the shield. In heraldic literature, the terms "rallying cry" respectively "battle banner" are also common, which date back to the battle cry , and is usually located above the coat of arms. In English heraldry mottos are not granted with armorial bearings, and may be adopted and changed at will
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Local Government
LOCAL GOVERNMENT is a form of public administration which, in a majority of contexts, exists as the lowest tier of administration within a given state. The term is used to contrast with offices at state level, which are referred to as the central government , national government, or (where appropriate) federal government and also to supranational government which deals with governing institutions between states. Local governments generally act within powers delegated to them by legislation or directives of the higher level of government. In federal states , local government generally comprises the third (or sometimes fourth) tier of government, whereas in unitary states , local government usually occupies the second or third tier of government, often with greater powers than higher-level administrative divisions. The question of municipal autonomy is a key question of public administration and governance . The institutions of local government vary greatly between countries, and even where similar arrangements exist, the terminology often varies. Common names for local government entities include state, province , region , department , county , prefecture , district , city , township , town , borough , parish , municipality , shire , village , and local service district
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Middlesex
MIDDLESEX (/ˈmɪdəlsɛks/ , abbreviation: MIDDX) is a historic county in south-east England. It is now entirely within the wider urbanised area of London. Its area is now also mostly within the ceremonial county of Greater London
Greater London
, with small sections in other neighbouring ceremonial counties . It was established in the Anglo- Saxon
Saxon
system from the territory of the Middle Saxons , and existed as an official unit until 1965. The historic county includes land stretching north of the River Thames
River Thames
from 3 miles (5 km) east to 17 miles (27 km) west of the City of London
City of London
with the rivers Colne and Lea and a ridge of hills as the other boundaries. The largely low-lying county, dominated by clay in its north and alluvium on gravel in its south, was the second smallest county by area in 1831 . The City of London
City of London
was a county in its own right from the 12th century and was able to exert political control over Middlesex. Westminster Abbey dominated most of the early financial, judicial and ecclesiastical aspects of the county. As London
London
grew into Middlesex, the Corporation of London resisted attempts to expand the city boundaries into the county, which posed problems for the administration of local government and justice
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England
ENGLAND is a country that is part of the United Kingdom . It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain (which lies in the North Atlantic ) in its centre and south; and includes over 100 smaller islands such as the Isles of Scilly , and the Isle of Wight . The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles , one of the Germanic tribes who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery , which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language , the Anglican Church , and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations
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Local Government Act 1858
LOCAL BOARDS or LOCAL BOARDS OF HEALTH were local authorities in urban areas of England and Wales
England and Wales
from 1848 to 1894. They were formed in response to cholera epidemics and were given powers to control sewers, clean the streets, regulate environmental health risks including slaughterhouses and ensure the proper supply of water to their districts. Local boards were eventually merged with the corporations of municipal boroughs in 1873, or became urban districts in 1894. CONTENTS* 1 Public Health Act 1848 * 1.1 General Board of Health * 1.2 Forming a local board of health * 1.3 Membership of a local board * 1.4 Powers of a local board * 2 Local Government Act 1858 * 2.1 The Local Government Act Office and the Local Government Board * 2.2 Constituting local boards * 2.3 Additional powers * 3 Number of local boards * 4 Sanitary districts and urban districts * 5 See also * 6 Sources * 7 Notes PUBLIC HEALTH ACT 1848The first local boards were created under the PUBLIC HEALTH ACT 1848 (11 sewerage; drainage; cleansing; paving, and environmental health regulation under a single local body. The act could be applied to any place in England and Wales
England and Wales
except the City of London
City of London
and some other areas in the Metropolis already under the control of sewer commissioners
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Acton, London
ACTON (/ˈæktən/ ) is a large area within the London
London
Borough of Ealing
Ealing
in west London
London
, England, 6.1 miles (10 km) west of Charing Cross . At the 2011 census , its four wards , East Acton, Acton Central, South Acton and Southfield, had a population of 62,480, a ten-year increase of 8,791 people. North Acton , West Acton , East Acton , South Acton , Acton Green , Acton Town , Acton Vale and Acton Central are all parts of Acton. Acton means "oak farm" or "farm by oak trees", and is derived from the Old English āc (oak) and tūn (farm). Originally an ancient village, as London
London
expanded, Acton became absorbed into the city. Since 1965, Acton equates to the east of the London
London
Borough of Ealing , though some of East Acton is in the London
London
Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham
Fulham
and a small portion of South Acton is in the London
London
Borough of Hounslow . Acton and Harrow are the two locations with the most stations bearing their name anywhere in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(apart from the full names of the London
London
terminus stations), with seven each
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Local Government Act 1894
THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1894 (56 or in more than one administrative county, were to be divided into separate parishes. * Parishes with a population of 300 or more were to have parish councils. Parishes with a lower population were to be grouped with other parishes so as to reach a population of 300 and have a joint parish council. * Each parish was to have a parish meeting at which each elector had a single vote on all matters raised. * Parish councillors would have a one-year term of office, with the old council retiring and the new council coming into office on 15 April. * Parish councils were to consist of a chairman and councillors. There were to be between five and fifteen councillors, with the number fixed by the county council. * Nominations to the council were to be made at a parish meeting previous to 15 April, and if there were more candidates than vacancies, a poll was to be held. * Every parish council was to be a body corporate with perpetual succession. Where there was doubt as to the name of the parish, this was to be fixed by the county council. * The parish council would be permitted to hold their meetings free of charge in a room in a state-supported public elementary school. * The parish council was to assume all powers exercised by parish vestries except those dealing with the church or ecclesiastical charities
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Mayor
In many countries, a MAYOR (/ˈmɛər/ or /ˈmeɪər/ , from the Latin
Latin
_maior_ , meaning "bigger") is the highest-ranking official in a municipal government such as that of a city or a town . Worldwide, there is a wide variance in local laws and customs regarding the powers and responsibilities of a mayor as well as the means by which a mayor is elected or otherwise mandated. Depending on the system chosen, a mayor may be the chief executive officer of the municipal government, may simply chair a multi-member governing body with little or no independent power, or may play a solely ceremonial role. Options for selection of a mayor include direct election by the public, or selection by an elected governing council or board
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Alderman
An ALDERMAN is a member of a municipal assembly or council in many jurisdictions founded upon English law . The term may be titular, denoting a high-ranking member of a borough or county council, a council member chosen by the elected members themselves rather than by popular vote, or a council member elected by voters. The title is derived from the Old English title of _ealdorman _, literally meaning "elder man", and was used by the chief nobles presiding over shires . Similar titles exist in other Germanic countries, such as the Swedish _Ålderman_, the Danish and Frisian _Olderman_, the Dutch _Ouderman_, the Finnish _Oltermanni_ and the German _Ältester_ which all mean "elder man" or "wise man". CONTENTS* 1 Usage by country * 1.1 Australia * 1.2 Canada * 1.3 Ireland * 1.4 England and Wales * 1.4.1 Honorary Alderman * 1.4.2 City of London * 1.5 Scotland * 1.6 South Africa * 1.7 United States * 2 See also * 3 References USAGE BY COUNTRYAUSTRALIAMany local government bodies used the term "alderman" in Australia. As in the way local councils have been modernised in the United Kingdom and Ireland , the term alderman has been discontinued in a number of places. For example, in the state of Queensland before 1994, rural "shires" elected "councillors" and a "chairman", while "cities" elected a "mayor" and "aldermen"
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Coat Of Arms
A COAT OF ARMS is an heraldic visual design on an escutcheon (i.e., shield ), surcoat , or tabard . The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the full heraldic achievement which in its whole consists of shield, supporters , crest , and motto . A coat of arms is traditionally unique to an individual person , family (except in the United Kingdom ), state, organ