HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Multiracial American
Multiracial
Multiracial
Americans
Americans
are Americans
Americans
who have mixed ancestry of "two or more races". The term may also include Americans
Americans
of mixed-race ancestry who self-identify with just one group culturally and socially (cf. the one-drop rule). In the 2010 US census, approximately 9 million individuals, or 2.9% of the population, self-identified as multiracial.[2][3] There is evidence that an accounting by genetic ancestry would produce a higher number
[...More...]

"Multiracial American" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Western United States
The Western United States, commonly referred to as the American West, the Far West, or simply the West, traditionally refers to the region comprising the westernmost states of the United States. Because European settlement in the U.S. expanded westward after its founding, the meaning of the West has evolved over time. Prior to about 1800, the crest of the Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
was seen as the western frontier. Since then, the frontier generally moved westward and eventually, the lands west of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
came to be referred to as the West.[2] Though no consensus exists, even among experts, for the definition of the West as a region, the U.S
[...More...]

"Western United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Slavery
Slavery
Slavery
is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.[1] A slave is unable to withdraw unilaterally from such an arrangement and works without remuneration. Many scholars now use the term chattel slavery to refer to this specific sense of legalised, de jure slavery
[...More...]

"Slavery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Houma People
The Houma (/ˈhoʊmə/) are a historic Native American tribe located in Louisiana
Louisiana
on the east side of the Red River of the South. Their descendants, the Houma people
Houma people
or organization ““The United Houma Nation””, have been a state recognized tribe since 1972.[1] According to the tribe, they have about 17,000 enrolled tribal citizens residing within a six-parish (county) service area, which encompasses 4,750 square miles. The six parishes are the following: St. Mary, Terrebonne, Lafourche, Jefferson, Plaquemines, and St. Bernard parishes. The city of Houma (meaning "red"), and the Red River were both named after this people
[...More...]

"Houma People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eastern US
The Eastern United States, commonly referred to as the American East or simply the East, is a region roughly coinciding with the boundaries of the United States
United States
established in the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which bounded the new country to the west along the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. It is geographically diverse, spanning the Northeast and Southeast as well as the eastern part of the Central United States. In 2011 the 26 states east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
(in addition to Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
but not including the small portions of Louisiana
Louisiana
and Minnesota
Minnesota
east of the river) had an estimated population of 179,948,346 or 58.28% of the total U.S. population
U.S

[...More...]

"Eastern US" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jim Crow Laws
Jim Crow laws
Jim Crow laws
were state and local laws that enforced racial segregation in the Southern United States. Enacted by white Democratic-dominated state legislatures in the late 19th century after the Reconstruction period, these laws continued to be enforced until 1965. They mandated racial segregation in all public facilities in the states of the former Confederate States of America, starting in the 1870s and 1880s, and upheld by the United States Supreme Court's "separate but equal" doctrine for African Americans. Public education had essentially been segregated since its establishment in most of the South after the Civil War. This principle was extended to public facilities and transportation, including segregated cars on interstate trains and, later, buses
[...More...]

"Jim Crow Laws" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Colored
Colored
Colored
is an ethnic descriptor historically used in the United States (predominantly during the Jim Crow
Jim Crow
era) and the United Kingdom. In the US, the term initially denoted non-"white" individuals generally.[1] The meaning was essentially the same in the UK, with "coloured" thus equivalent to "people of colour".[2] However, usage of the appellation "colored" in the American South gradually came to be restricted to "negroes".[3] Following the Civil Rights Movement, "colored" and "negro" gave way to "black" and (in the US) "African American". According to the Merriam-Webster
Merriam-Webster
dictionary, the word colored was first used in the 14th century, but with a meaning other than race or ethnicity.[4] In other English-speaking countries, the term – often spelled coloured[5] – has varied meanings
[...More...]

"Colored" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Creolization
Creolization is the process in which Creole cultures emerge in the New World.[1] As a result of colonization there was a mixture among people of Indigenous American, West African and European descent, which came to be understood as Creolization. Creolization is traditionally used to refer to the Caribbean; although not exclusive to the Caribbean
Caribbean
it can be further extended to represent other diasporas.[2] The mixing of people brought a cultural mixing which ultimately led to the formation of new identities
[...More...]

"Creolization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cultural Assimilation
Cultural assimilation is the process in which a minority group or culture resembles those of a dominant group. The term is used to refer to both individuals and groups; the latter case can refer to a range of social groups, including ethnic minorities, immigrants, indigenous peoples, and other marginalized groups such as sexual minorities who adapt to being culturally dominated by another societal group. Cultural assimilation may involve either a quick or a gradual change depending on circumstances of the group. Full assimilation occurs when members of a society become indistinguishable from those of the dominant group. Whether it is desirable for a given group to assimilate is often disputed by both members of the group and those of the dominant society
[...More...]

"Cultural Assimilation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Racial Integration
Racial integration, or simply integration, includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). In addition to desegregation, integration includes goals such as leveling barriers to association, creating equal opportunity regardless of race, and the development of a culture that draws on diverse traditions, rather than merely bringing a racial minority into the majority culture. Desegregation
Desegregation
is largely a legal matter, integration largely a social one.Contents1 Distinguishing integration from desegregation1.1 Distinction not universally accepted2 See also2.1 Lawsuits3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksDistinguishing integration from desegregation[edit]A white child and black child together at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio, USAMorris J. MacGregor, Jr
[...More...]

"Racial Integration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Civil Rights Movement
The civil rights movement (also known as the African-American civil rights movement, American civil rights movement and other terms)[b] was a decades long movement with the goal of securing legal rights for African Americans
African Americans
that other Americans
Americans
already held. With roots starting in the Reconstruction era
Reconstruction era
during the late 19th century, the movement resulted in the largest legislative impacts after the direct actions and grassroots protests organized from the mid-1950s until 1968
[...More...]

"Civil Rights Movement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ethnic Groups Of Africa
The ethnic groups of Africa number in the thousands, each generally having its own language (or dialect of a language) and culture
[...More...]

"Ethnic Groups Of Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Southern United States
The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland and the South, is a region of the United States
United States
of America. The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
in the American Civil War.[2] The Deep South
Deep South
is fully located in the southeastern corner
[...More...]

"Southern United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Partus Sequitur Ventrem
Partus sequitur ventrem, often abbreviated to partus, in the British North American colonies and later in the United States, was a legal doctrine which the English royal colonies incorporated in legislation related to the status of children born in the colonies and the definitions of slavery. It was derived from the Roman civil law; it held that the social status of a child followed that of his or her mother. Thus, any child born to an enslaved woman was born into slavery, regardless of the ancestry or citizenship of the father. This principle was widely adopted into the laws of slavery in the colonies and the following United States, eliminating financial responsibility of fathers for children born into slavery
[...More...]

"Partus Sequitur Ventrem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Common Law
Common law
Common law
(also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is that body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.[1][2][3][4][5] The defining characteristic of “common law” is that it arises as precedent. In cases where the parties disagree on what the law is, a common law court looks to past precedential decisions of relevant courts, and synthesizes the principles of those past cases as applicable to the current facts. If a similar dispute has been resolved in the past, the court is usually bound to follow the reasoning used in the prior decision (a principle known as stare decisis)
[...More...]

"Common Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

American Revolution
The American Revolution
Revolution
was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States
United States
of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War in alliance with France and others. Members of American colonial society argued the position of "no taxation without representation", starting with the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. They rejected the authority of the British Parliament to tax them because they lacked members in that governing body
[...More...]

"American Revolution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.