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Multiplication
Multiplication
Multiplication
(often denoted by the cross symbol "×", by a point "⋅", by juxtaposition, or, on computers, by an asterisk "∗") is one of the four elementary mathematical operations of arithmetic; with the others being addition, subtraction and division. The multiplication of whole numbers may be thought as a repeated addition; that is, the multiplication of two numbers is equivalent to adding as many copies of one of them, the multiplicand, as the value of the other one, the multiplier
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Coefficient
In mathematics, a coefficient is a multiplicative factor in some term of a polynomial, a series or any expression; it is usually a number, but may be any expression. In the latter case, the variables appearing in the coefficients are often called parameters, and must be clearly distinguished from the other variables. For example, in 7 x 2 − 3 x y + 1.5 + y , displaystyle 7x^ 2 -3xy+1.5+y, the first two terms respectively have the coefficients 7 and −3. The third term 1.5 is a constant. The final term does not have any explicitly written coefficient, but is considered to have coefficient 1, since multiplying by that factor would not change the term. Often coefficients are numbers as in this example, although they could be parameters of the problem or any expression in these parameters
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Computer Programming
Computer programming
Computer programming
(often shortened to programming) is a process that leads from an original formulation of a computing problem to executable computer programs. Programming involves activities such as analysis, developing understanding, generating algorithms, verification of requirements of algorithms including their correctness and resources consumption, and implementation (commonly referred to as coding[1][2]) of algorithms in a target programming language. Source code is written in one or more programming languages. The purpose of programming is to find a sequence of instructions that will automate performing a specific task or solving a given problem
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Vector (mathematics)
When used without any further description, vector usually refers either to:Most generally, an element of a vector space In physics and geometry, a Euclidean vector
Euclidean vector
or a direction vector, used to represent physical quantities that have both magnitude and directionVector can also have a variety of different meanings depending on context. Vectors[edit]An element of a vector spaceAn element of the real coordinate space Rn Basis vector, one of a set of vectors (a "basis") that, in linear combination, can represent every vector in a given vector space Column vector or row vector, a one-dimensional
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Variable (mathematics)
In elementary mathematics, a variable is a symbol, commonly an alphabetic character, that represents a number, called the value of the variable, which is either arbitrary, not fully specified, or unknown. Making algebraic computations with variables as if they were explicit numbers allows one to solve a range of problems in a single computation. A typical example is the quadratic formula, which allows one to solve every quadratic equation by simply substituting the numeric values of the coefficients of the given equation to the variables that represent them. The concept of a variable is also fundamental in calculus. Typically, a function y = f(x) involves two variables, y and x, representing respectively the value and the argument of the function
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Decimal Separator
A decimal separator is a symbol used to separate the integer part from the fractional part of a number written in decimal form. Different countries officially designate different symbols for the decimal separator. The choice of symbol for the decimal separator also affects the choice of symbol for the thousands separator used in digit grouping, so the latter is also treated in this article. It is often referred to by various other generic names, e.g., decimal mark, decimal marker, or decimal sign, or after the regional representation, e.g., decimal point
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Mathematical Notation
Mathematical notation is a system of symbolic representations of mathematical objects and ideas
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Infix Notation
Infix
Infix
notation Prefix notation ("Polish")v t e Infix
Infix
notation is the notation commonly used in arithmetical and logical formulae and statements. It is characterized by the placement of operators between operands—"infixed operators"—such as the plus sign in 2 + 2.Contents1 Usage 2 Order of operations 3 Further notations 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUsage[edit] Infix
Infix
notation is more difficult to parse by computers than prefix notation (e.g. + 2 2) or postfix notation (e.g. 2 2 +). However many programming languages use it due to its familiarity. It is more used in arithmetic, e.g. 5 × 6.[1] Order of operations[edit] In infix notation, unlike in prefix or postfix notations, parentheses surrounding groups of operands and operators are necessary to indicate the intended order in which operations are to be performed
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Multiplier (linguistics)
In linguistics, more precisely in traditional grammar, a multiplier is a word that counts how many times its object should be multiplied, such as single or double. They are contrasted with distributive numbers. In English, this part of speech is relatively marginal, and less recognized than cardinal numbers and ordinal numbers. English[edit] See also: English numerals § Multiplicative adverbs In English native multipliers exist, formed by the suffix -fold, as in onefold, twofold, threefold. However, these have largely been replaced by single, double, and triple, which are of Latin origin, via French. They have a corresponding distributive number formed by suffixing -y (reduction of Middle English -lely > -ly), as in singly. However, the series is primarily used for the first few numbers; quadruple and quintuple are less common, and hextuple and above are quite rare
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Marble (toy)
A marble is a small spherical toy often made from glass, clay, steel, plastic or agate. These balls vary in size. Most commonly, they are about 1 cm (1⁄2 in) in diameter, but they may range from less than 1 mm (1⁄30 in) to over 8 cm (3 in), while some art glass marbles for display purposes are over 30 cm (12 in) wide. Marbles can be used for a variety of games called marbles. They are often collected, both for nostalgia and for their aesthetic colors
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Rectangle
In Euclidean plane geometry, a rectangle is a quadrilateral with four right angles. It can also be defined as an equiangular quadrilateral, since equiangular means that all of its angles are equal (360°/4 = 90°). It can also be defined as a parallelogram containing a right angle. A rectangle with four sides of equal length is a square. The term oblong is occasionally used to refer to a non-square rectangle.[1][2][3] A rectangle with vertices ABCD would be denoted as  ABCD. The word rectangle comes from the Latin
Latin
rectangulus, which is a combination of rectus (as an adjective, right, proper) and angulus (angle). A crossed rectangle is a crossed (self-intersecting) quadrilateral which consists of two opposite sides of a rectangle along with the two diagonals.[4] It is a special case of an antiparallelogram, and its angles are not right angles
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Length
In geometric measurements, length is the most extended dimension of an object.[1] In the International System of Quantities, length is any quantity with dimension distance. In other contexts, length is a measured dimension of an object. Length
Length
may be distinguished from height, which is vertical extent, and width or breadth, which are the distance from side to side, measuring across the object at right angles to the length. For example, it is possible to cut a length of wire shorter than the wire's width
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EBCDIC
Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code[1] (EBCDIC[1]; /ˈɛbsɪdɪk/) is an eight-bit character encoding used mainly on IBM mainframe and " href="../php/SummaryGet.php?FindGo=IBM " style= " text-decoration:none; color:#000060; " target="_blank"> IBM " height="200 " width="208.5308056872";>
IBM
midrange computer operating systems
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Scale Factor
A scale factor is a number which scales, or multiplies, some quantity. In the equation y = Cx, C is the scale factor for x. C is also the coefficient of x, and may be called the constant of proportionality of y to x. For example, doubling distances corresponds to a scale factor of two for distance, while cutting a cake in half results in pieces with a scale factor of one half. The basic equation for it is image over preimage. In the field of measurements, the scale factor of an instrument is sometimes referred to as sensitivity
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