HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Muhammad Al-Baqir
Muḥammad al-Baqir, full name Muhammad
Muhammad
bin ' Ali
Ali
bin al-Husayn bin Ali bin Abi Talib, also known as Abu Ja'far or simply al-Baqir (Arabic: محمد الباقر‎, translit. al-Bāqir, lit. 'the one who opens knowledge')[2] (677-733) was the fifth Shia imam, succeeding his father Zayn al-Abidin
Zayn al-Abidin
and succeeded by his son Ja'far al-Sadiq. He was the first imam descended from both grandsons of Muhammad: Hasan ibn Ali
Ali
and Husayn ibn Ali
[...More...]

"Muhammad Al-Baqir" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Imamate (Twelver Doctrine)
Imamate
Imamate
(Arabic: إمامة‎ imāmah) is a word derived from imam and meaning "leadership". Its use in theology is confined to Shia. An imam is the head or leader of an imamate and is similar to a caliph or khalifah with one major difference: While a caliph is more of a political head of a state, the imam (in imamate) is a religious as well as a political head of a group of people
[...More...]

"Imamate (Twelver Doctrine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Umayyad Caliphate
The Umayyad Caliphate
Caliphate
(Arabic: ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلأُمَوِيَّة‎, trans. Al-Khilāfatu al-ʾUmawiyyah), also spelt Omayyad,[2] was the second of the four major caliphates established after the death of Muhammad. The caliphate was ruled by the Umayyad dynasty
Umayyad dynasty
(Arabic: ٱلأُمَوِيُّون‎, al-ʾUmawiyyūn, or بَنُو أُمَيَّة, Banū ʾUmayya, "Sons of Umayya"), hailing from Mecca. An Umayyad clan member had previously come to power as the third Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliph, Uthman ibn Affan
Uthman ibn Affan
(r. 644–656), but official Umayyad rule was established by Muawiya ibn Abi Sufyan, long-time governor of Syria, after the end of the First Muslim Civil War in AD 661
[...More...]

"Umayyad Caliphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Muhammad
Muhammad[n 1] (Arabic: محمد‎; pronounced [muħammad];[n 2] French: Mahomet /məˈhɒmɪt/; Latinized as Mahometus c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE)[1] was the founder of Islam.[2][3] According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet and God's messenger, sent to present and confirm the monotheistic teachings preached previously by Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.[3][4][5][6] He is viewed as the final prophet of God
God
in all the main branches of Islam, though some modern denominations diverge from this belief.[n 3]
[...More...]

"Muhammad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hijri Year
The Hijri year
Hijri year
(Arabic: سَنة هِجْريّة‎) or era (التقويم الهجري at-taqwīm al-hijrī) is the era used in the Islamic lunar calendar, which begins its count from the Islamic New Year in 622 AD. During that year, Muhammad
Muhammad
and his followers migrated from Mecca
Mecca
to Yathrib (now Medina). This event, known as the Hijra, is commemorated in Islam
Islam
for its role in the founding of the first Muslim community (ummah). In the West, this era is most commonly denoted as AH (Latin: Anno Hegirae /ˈænoʊ ˈhɛdʒɪriː/, "in the year of the Hijra") in parallel with the Christian (AD) and Jewish eras (AM) and can similarly be placed before or after the date. In Muslim countries, it is also commonly abbreviated H ("Hijra") from its Arabic abbreviation hāʾ (هـ)
[...More...]

"Hijri Year" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Muawiyah I
Mu‘āwīyya or Muawiyah or Muaawiya (معاوية) is a male Arabic given name of disputed meaning. It was the name of the first Umayyad caliph.[1] Notable bearers of this name include: Muawiyah I (602–680), first Umayyad Caliph
Umayyad Caliph
(r. 661–680) Muawiya II (661–684), third Umayyad Caliph
Umayyad Caliph
(r. 683–684) Mu'awiya ibn Hudayj, Umayyad general and governor Mu'awiya ibn Hisham (died 737), Umayyad prince and general (fl. 725–737) Maaouya Ould Sid'Ahmed Taya (born 1941), Prime-Minister, then President of MauritaniaPlaces[edit]Mu'awiya, BasmaReferences[edit]^ "Tareekh-ul-Khulafa". Scribd.com. 2010-09-26. Archived from the original on December 5, 2013. Retrieved 2014-03-27. External links[edit]Ruling on calling one’s son Mu’aawiyah and mention of some who bore this name "This page or section lists people that share the same given name
[...More...]

"Muawiyah I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Yazid I
Yazīd ibn Mu‘āwiya (Arabic: يزيد بن معاوية بن أبي سفيان‎; 647 – 11 November 683), commonly known as Yazid I, was the second caliph of the Umayyad
Umayyad
caliphate (and the first one through inheritance). Yazid was the caliph as appointed by his father Muawiyah I and ruled for three years from 680 CE until his death in 683 CE.Contents1 Rise to power1.1 Oath of allegiance of Yazid2 Hussain-ibn-Ali 3 Abdullah ibn al-Zubayr 4 Setbacks 5 Death 6 Historical evaluation 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksRise to power[edit] Yazid's father, Muawiyah, had signed a treaty with Hasan ibn Ali, where Muawiya promised that, among other conditions, Muawiya would give the caliphate back to Hasan when Muawiya passed away; and if Hasan passed away before Muawiya, then the caliphate would go to Hasan's brother, Hussein ibn Ali, upon Muawiya's death
[...More...]

"Yazid I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Tarikh Al-Yaqubi
Taʾrik ibn Wadih or popularly Tarikh Yaqubi (Arabic: تاريخ اليعقوبي‎) is a well-known classical Islamic history
Islamic history
book, written by Ya'qubi.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Editions 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] Like his contemporary Al-Dinawari, Ya'qubi's histories, unlike those of their predecessors, aimed to entertain as well as instruct; they are "literary" productions.[citation needed] His history is divided into two parts.[1] In the first he gives a comprehensive account of the pre-Islamic and non-Islamic peoples, especially of their religion and literature. For the time of the patriarchs his source is now seen to be the Syriac work published by Karl Bezold
Karl Bezold
as Die Schatzhöhle. In his account of India he is the first to give an account of the stories of Kalila
Kalila
and Dimna, as well as of Sindibad (Sinbad)
[...More...]

"Tarikh Al-Yaqubi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Karbala
Karbala
Karbala
(Arabic: كَرْبَلَاء‎, Karbalā’, Persian: کربلاء) is a city in central Iraq, located about 100 km (62 mi) southwest of Baghdad, and a few miles east of Lake Milh.[2][3] Karbala
Karbala
is the capital of Karbala
Karbala
Governorate, and has an estimated population of 0.7 million people (2015). The city, best known as the location of the Ma'rakat Karbalā’ (Arabic: مَعرَكة كَـربَـلَاء‎, Battle of Karbala) in 680 CE, or the Masjidayn (Arabic: مَـسـجِـدَيـن‎, two Mosques) of Imam
Imam
Husayn and Abbas,[4][5] is considered as a holy city for Shi'ite Muslims as Mecca, Medina
Medina
and Jerusalem
[...More...]

"Karbala" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Abd Allah Ibn Al-Zubayr
`Abd Allah al-Zubayr or ibn Zubayr (Arabic: عبد الله بن الزبير‎ ‘Abdallāh ibn az-Zubayr; 624–692)[1] was an Arab sahabi whose father was Zubayr ibn al-Awwam, and whose mother was Asma bint Abi Bakr, daughter of the first Caliph
Caliph
Abu Bakr
[...More...]

"Abd Allah Ibn Al-Zubayr" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Romanization Of Arabic
The romanization of Arabic
Arabic
writes written and spoken Arabic
Arabic
in the Latin script
Latin script
in one of various systematic ways. Romanized Arabic
Arabic
is used for a number of different purposes, among them transcription of names and titles, cataloging Arabic language
Arabic language
works, language education when used in lieu of or alongside the Arabic
Arabic
script, and representation of the language in scientific publications by linguists
[...More...]

"Romanization Of Arabic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ibn Khallikan
Aḥmad b. Muḥammad b. Ibrāhīm Abu ’l-ʿAbbās S̲h̲ams al-Dīn al-Barmakī al-Irbilī al-S̲h̲āfiʿī[2] (Arabic: احمد ابن محمد ابن ابراهيم ابوالعباس شمس الدين البرمكي الاربيلي الشافعي‎) (September 22, 1211 – October 30, 1282) was a Shafi'i
Shafi'i
Islamic scholar of the 13th Century and is famous as the compiler of a great biographical dictionary of Arab scholars, Wafayāt al-Aʿyān wa-Anbāʾ Abnāʾ az-Zamān (Deaths of Eminent Men and History of the Sons of the Epoch).Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 BibliographyBiography[edit] Born in Arbil, Iraq
Iraq
on September 22, 1211 (11 Rabī’ al-Thānī, 608), into a respectable family that claimed descent from Barmakids, [2] Ibn Khallikan's studies began in Arbil
[...More...]

"Ibn Khallikan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kitab Al-Kafi
The book Al-Kāfī (The Sufficient Book) is a Twelver
Twelver
Shīʿī ḥadīth collection compiled by Muhammad ibn Ya‘qūb al-Kulaynī.[1] It is divided into three sections: Usūl al-Kāfī, which is concerned with epistemology, theology, history, ethics, supplication, and the Qurʾān, Furūʿ al-Kāfī, which is concerned with practical and legal issues, and Rawdat (or Rauda) al-Kāfī, which includes miscellaneous traditions, many of which are lengthy letters and speeches transmitted from the Imāms.[2] In total, al-Kāfī comprises 16,199 narrations.[3]Contents1 Usūl(fundamentals) al-Kāfī 2 Furū al-Kāfī 3 Rawdat al-Kāfī 4 Authenticity 5 Scholarly remarks 6 Shia view of al-Kafi relative to other hadith books 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksUsūl(fundamentals) al-Kāfī[edit] Usūl al-Kāfī: The first eight books of al-Kāfī are commonly referred to as Uṣūl al-kāfī
[...More...]

"Kitab Al-Kafi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jabir Ibn Abd Allah
Father: Abdullah ibn Amr Mother: Nasiba bint UqbaReligion IslamPolitical PartyJabir ibn ʿAbdullah ibn ʾAmr ibn Haram al-Ansari (Arabic: جابر بن عبدالله بن عمرو بن حرام الأنصاري‎, died 697 CE/78 AH) was a prominent companion of Muhammad.Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Muhammad's era1.2.1 Battle of Uhud1.3 Ali
Ali
ibn Abu Talib era 1.4 Ali
Ali
ibn Husayn's (ibn Ali) era (Shia doctrine) 1.5 Abd al-Malik's era and Jabir’s death2 Legacy 3 List of narrated hadith 4 See also 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Early life[edit] Jabir ibn ʿAbdullah al-Ansari was born in Yathrib (now known as Medina) 15 years before the Hijra. He belonged to a poor family of Yathrib. He was from the tribe of Khazraj. His mother was Nasiba bint Uqba ibn Uddi
[...More...]

"Jabir Ibn Abd Allah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ahl Al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
(Arabic: أهل البيت‎, Persian: اهلِ بیت‎), also Āl al-Bayt, is a phrase meaning, literally, "People of the House" or "Family of the House". Within the Islamic tradition, the term refers to the family of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[1] In Shia Islam
Shia Islam
the Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
are central to Islam
Islam
and interpreters of the Quran
Quran
and Sunnah. Shias believe they are successors of Muhammad and consist of Muhammad, Fatimah, Ali, Hasan, and Husayn (known collectively as the Ahl al-Kisa, "people of the mantle") and the Imams the Fourteen Infallibles
[...More...]

"Ahl Al-Bayt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hadith
Ḥadīth (/ˈhædɪθ/[1] or /hɑːˈdiːθ/;[2] Arabic: حديث‎ ḥadīth, pl. Aḥādīth, أحاديث, ʼaḥādīth[3], also "Traditions") in Islam
Islam
denotes the words, actions, and the silent approval, of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Within Islam
Islam
the authority of Ḥadīth as a source for religious law ranks inferior only to the Qur'an
Qur'an
— which Muslims hold to be the word of Allah
Allah
revealed to his messenger Muhammad
[...More...]

"Hadith" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.