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Mound Builder (people)
The various cultures collectively termed Mound
Mound
Builders were inhabitants of North America
North America
who, during a 5,000-year period, constructed various styles of earthen mounds for religious and ceremonial, burial, and elite residential purposes. These included the Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
cultures of the Archaic period; Woodland period
Woodland period
(Adena and Hopewell cultures); and Mississippian period; dating from roughly 3500 BCE (the construction of Watson Brake) to the 16th century CE, and living in regions of the Great Lakes, the Ohio River
Ohio River
Valley, and the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
valley and its tributary waters.[1] Since the 19th century, the prevailing scholarly consensus has been that the mounds were constructed by indigenous peoples of the Americas
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Mound Builder (other)
The Mound Builders
Mound Builders
were members of various indigenous North American cultures who constructed earthwork mounds. Mound builder or mound builders may refer to:Southwestern Moundbuilders, athletic teams representing Southwestern College Mound-builder (bird), or Megapode, birds in the family Megapodiidae Mound-building termites, a group of termite species that live in mounds Mound-building mouse
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Archeology
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
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Monks Mound
Monks Mound
Monks Mound
is the largest Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
earthwork in the Americas and the largest pyramid north of Mesoamerica. The beginning of its construction dates from 900-955 CE. Located at the Cahokia
Cahokia
Mounds UNESCO World Heritage Site
UNESCO World Heritage Site
near Collinsville, Illinois, the mound size was calculated in 1988 as about 100 feet (30 m) high, 955 feet (291 m) long including the access ramp at the southern end, and 775 feet (236 m) wide.[1] This makes Monks Mound
Monks Mound
roughly the same size at its base as the Great Pyramid of Giza
Great Pyramid of Giza
(13.1 acres / 5.3 hectares). Its base circumference is larger than the Pyramid of the Sun
Pyramid of the Sun
at Teotihuacan
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Cahokia
The Cahokia
Cahokia
Mounds State Historic Site /kəˈhoʊkiə/ (11 MS 2)[2] is the site of a pre-Columbian Native American city (c. 600–1400 CE) directly across the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
from modern St. Louis, Missouri. This historic park lies in southern Illinois
Illinois
between East St. Louis and Collinsville.[3] The park covers 2,200 acres (890 ha), or about 3.5 square miles (9 km2), and contains about 80 mounds, but the ancient city was much larger
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Tribe
A tribe is viewed developmentally, economically, and/or historically, as a social group existing outside of or before the development of states. A tribe is a group of distinct people, dependent on their land for their livelihood, who are largely self-sufficient, and not integrated into the national society. It is perhaps the term most readily understood and used by the general public to describe such communities
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Chiefdom
A chiefdom is a form of hierarchical political organization in non-industrial societies usually based on kinship, and in which formal leadership is monopolized by the legitimate senior members of select families or 'houses'
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Cosmology
Cosmology
Cosmology
(from the Greek κόσμος, kosmos "world" and -λογία, -logia "study of") is the study of the origin, evolution, and eventual fate of the universe
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Eastern United States
The Eastern United States, commonly referred to as the American East or simply the East, is a region roughly coinciding with the boundaries of the United States
United States
established in the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which bounded the new country to the west along the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. It is geographically diverse, spanning the Northeast and Southeast as well as the eastern part of the Central United States. In 2011 the 26 states east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
(in addition to Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
but not including the small portions of Louisiana
Louisiana
and Minnesota
Minnesota
east of the river) had an estimated population of 179,948,346 or 58.28% of the total U.S. population
U.S

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1848 In Archaeology
1848
1848
in archaeologyContents1 Explorations 2 Excavations 3 Publications 4 Finds 5 Awards 6 Miscellaneous 7 Births 8 Deaths 9 References 10 See alsoExplorations[edit]First scientific expedition visits TikalExcavations[edit]This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (July 2010)Publications[edit] Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley
Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley
by Ephraim George Squier and Edwin Hamilton Davis[1] First volume of Austen H
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Smithsonian
The Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
(/smɪθˈsoʊniən/ smith-SOH-nee-ən), established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.[1] The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson.[2] Originally organized as the "United States National Museum," that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.[3] Termed "the nation's attic"[4] for its eclectic holdings of 154 million items,[2] the Institution's nineteen museums, nine research centers, and zoo include historical and architectural landmarks, mostly located in the District of Columbia.[5] Additional facilities are located in Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York City, Pittsburgh, Texas, Virginia, and Panama
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Kentucky
Kentucky
Kentucky
(/kənˈtʌki/ ( listen) kən-TUK-ee), officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it,[5] Kentucky
Kentucky
is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth (the others being Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts). Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky
Kentucky
became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky
Kentucky
is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States. Kentucky
Kentucky
is known as the "Bluegrass State", a nickname based on the bluegrass found in many of its pastures due to the fertile soil
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Frustum
In geometry, a frustum[1] (plural: frusta or frustums) is the portion of a solid (normally a cone or pyramid) that lies between one or two parallel planes cutting it. A right frustum is a parallel truncation of a right pyramid or right cone.[1] In computer graphics the viewing frustum is the three-dimensional region which is visible on the screen
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Parkin Archeological State Park
Parkin Archeological State Park, also known as Parkin Indian Mound, is an archeological site and state park in Parkin, Cross County, Arkansas. Around 1350–1650 CE an aboriginal palisaded village existed at the site, at the confluence of the St. Francis and Tyronza Rivers. Artifacts from this site are on display at the site museum. The Parkin Site is the type site for the Parkin phase, an expression of the Mississippian culture from the Late Mississippian period
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Casqui
Casqui was a Native American polity discovered in 1541 by the Hernando de Soto expedition. This group inhabited fortified villages in eastern Arkansas. The tribe takes its name from the chieftain Casqui, who ruled the tribe from its primary village, thought to be located in present day Cross County, Arkansas near the town of Parkin. The suspected site is the focal point of the Parkin Archeological State Park and it has been determined that the site was continuously occupied for at least 500 years. Information about Chief Casqui and his people comes from journals made during the expedition of Hernando de Soto in 1541.Contents1 Hernando de Soto Expedition 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHernando de Soto Expedition[edit] When de Soto's expedition arrived in the area the Casqui walked over a mile from their village to greet the travelers and invite them to stay in the town. The travelers declined the offer and made camp outside of the village
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Hernando De Soto
Hernando de Soto
Hernando de Soto
(Spanish pronunciation: [erˈnando ðe ˈsoto]; c. 1495 – May 21, 1542) was a Spanish explorer and conquistador who led the first Spanish and European expedition deep into the territory of the modern-day United States (through Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and most likely Arkansas). He is the first European documented as having crossed the Mississippi
Mississippi
River.[4] De Soto's North American expedition was a vast undertaking. It ranged throughout the southeastern United States, both searching for gold, which had been reported by various Indian tribes and earlier coastal explorers, and for a passage to China
China
or the Pacific coast
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