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Motion Sickness
Motion sickness is a condition in which a disagreement exists between visually perceived movement and the vestibular system's sense of movement. Depending on the cause, it can also be referred to as seasickness, car sickness, simulation sickness or airsickness.[1] Dizziness, fatigue and nausea are the most common symptoms of motion sickness.[2] Sopite syndrome, in which a person feels fatigue or tiredness, is also associated with motion sickness. "Nausea" in Greek means seasickness (naus means ship).[3][4] If the motion causing nausea is not resolved, the sufferer will usually vomit
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NIH
The National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
(NIH) is the primary agency of the United States government
United States government
responsible for biomedical and public health research, founded in the late 1870s. It is part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services with facilities mainly located in Bethesda, Maryland
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Gherman Titov
Gherman Stepanovich Titov (Russian: Герман Степанович Титов; 11 September 1935 – 20 September 2000) was a Soviet cosmonaut who, on 6 August 1961,[1] became the second human to orbit the Earth, aboard Vostok 2, preceded by Yuri Gagarin
Yuri Gagarin
on Vostok 1. He was the fourth person in space, counting suborbital voyages of US astronauts Alan Shepard
Alan Shepard
and Gus Grissom. Titov's flight finally proved that humans could live and work in space. He was the first person to orbit the Earth multiple times (a total of 17), to spend more than a day in space, to sleep in orbit and to suffer from space sickness. In fact, he also holds the record for being the first person to vomit in space.[2] He was the first to pilot a spaceship personally and he made the first manual photographs from orbit, thus setting a record for modern space photography
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Specialty (medicine)
A specialty, or speciality, in medicine is a branch of medical practice. After completing medical school, physicians or surgeons usually further their medical education in a specific specialty of medicine by completing a multiple year residency to become a medical specialist.[1]Contents1 History of medical specialization 2 Classification of medical specialization 3 Specialties that are common worldwide 4 List of specialties recognized in the European Union and European Economic Area 5 List of North American medical specialties and others 6 Physician
Physician
compensation 7 Specialties by country7.1 Australia and New Zealand 7.2 Canada 7.3 Germany 7.4 India 7.5 United States 7.6 Specialty and Physician
Physician
Location8 Other uses 9 Training 10 Satisfaction 11 See also 12 ReferencesHistory of medical specialization[edit] To a certain extent, medical practitioners have always been specialized
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Roller Coaster
A roller coaster is a type of amusement ride that employs a form of elevated railroad track designed with tight turns, steep slopes, and sometimes inversions.[1] People ride along the track in open cars, and the rides are often found in amusement parks and theme parks around the world.[1] LaMarcus Adna Thompson
LaMarcus Adna Thompson
obtained one of the first known patents for a roller coaster design in 1885, related to the Switchback Railway that opened a year earlier at Coney Island.[2][3] The track in a coaster design does not necessarily have to be a complete circuit, as shuttle roller coasters demonstrate. Most roller coasters have multiple cars in which passengers sit and are restrained.[4] Two or more cars hooked together are called a train
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Camcorder
A camcorder is an electronic device originally combining a video camera and a videocassette recorder. The earliest camcorders were tape-based, recording analog signals onto videotape cassettes
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Steadicam
Steadicam
Steadicam
is a brand of camera stabilizer mounts for motion picture cameras invented by Garrett Brown
Garrett Brown
and introduced in 1975 by Cinema Products Corporation. It mechanically isolates the operator's movement, allowing for a smooth shot, even when the camera moves over an irregular surface.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Awards and recognitions3.1 Academy Award 3.2 American Society of Cinematographers 3.3 Society of Camera Operators 3.4 Steadicam
Steadicam
Guild Life Achievement Award 3.5 Nikola Tesla Satellite Award4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Before the camera stabilizing system, a director had two choices for moving (or "tracking") shots:The camera could be mounted on a dolly, a wheeled mount that rolls on tracks or leveled boards
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Image Stabilization
Image stabilization
Image stabilization
(IS) is a family of techniques that reduce blurring associated with the motion of a camera or other imaging device during exposure. Generally, it compensates for pan and tilt (angular movement, equivalent to yaw and pitch) of the imaging device, though electronic image stabilization can also compensate for rotation.[1] It is used in image-stabilized binoculars, still and video cameras, astronomical telescopes, and also smartphones, mainly the high-end. With still cameras, camera shake is particularly problematic at slow shutter speeds or with long focal length (telephoto or zoom) lenses. With video cameras, camera shake causes visible frame-to-frame jitter in the recorded video
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Stereoscopy
Stereoscopy
Stereoscopy
(also called stereoscopics, or stereo imaging) is a technique for creating or enhancing the illusion of depth in an image by means of stereopsis for binocular vision[2]. The word stereoscopy derives from Greek στερεός (stereos), meaning 'firm, solid', and σκοπέω (skopeō), meaning 'to look, to see'.[3][4] Any stereoscopic image is called a stereogram. Originally, stereogram referred to a pair of stereo images which could be viewed using a stereoscope. Most stereoscopic methods present two offset images separately to the left and right eye of the viewer. These two-dimensional images are then combined in the brain to give the perception of 3D depth
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National Advanced Driving Simulator
The National Advanced Driving Simulator
National Advanced Driving Simulator
is a self-sustained transportation safety research center at the University of Iowa. It is the nation's largest and first simulator of its kind anywhere in the world
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Space Shuttle
The Space Shuttle
Space Shuttle
was a partially reusable low Earth orbital spacecraft system operated by the U.S. National Aeronautics
Aeronautics
and Space Administration (NASA), as part of the Space Shuttle
Space Shuttle
program. Its official program name was Space Transportation System
Space Transportation System
(STS), taken from a 1969 plan for a system of reusable spacecraft of which it was the only item funded for development.[10] The first of four orbital test flights occurred in 1981, leading to operational flights beginning in 1982. In addition to the prototype whose completion was cancelled, five complete Shuttle systems were built and used on a total of 135 missions from 1981 to 2011, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida
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Vostok 2
Vostok programme Manned flights← Vostok 1 Vostok 3 → Vostok 2
Vostok 2
(Russian: Восток-2, Orient
Orient
2 or East 2) was a Soviet space mission which carried cosmonaut Gherman Titov
Gherman Titov
into orbit for a full day on August 6, 1961 to study the effects of a more prolonged period of weightlessness on the human body.[1] Titov orbited the Earth over 17 times, exceeding the single orbit of Yuri Gagarin
Yuri Gagarin
on Vostok 1 − as well as the suborbital spaceflights of American astronauts Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom
Gus Grissom
aboard their respective Mercury-Redstone 3
Mercury-Redstone 3
and 4 missions
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Mission
Mission
Mission
may refer to:Contents1 Agriculture 2 Government and military 3 Media 4 Places 5 Religion 6 Rivers 7 Other uses 8 See alsoAgriculture[edit] Mission
Mission
(grape), a variety of grape
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Frank Borman
Frank Frederick Borman II (born March 14, 1928), (Col, USAF, Ret.), is a retired United States Air Force
United States Air Force
pilot, aeronautical engineer, test pilot, and NASA
NASA
astronaut, best remembered as the Commander of Apollo 8, the first mission to fly around the Moon, making him, along with crew mates Jim Lovell
Jim Lovell
and Bill Anders, the first of only 24 humans to do so. Before flying on Apollo, he set a fourteen-day spaceflight endurance record on Gemini 7, and also served on the NASA
NASA
review board which investigated the Apollo 1
Apollo 1
fire. After leaving NASA, he was the Chief Executive Officer
Chief Executive Officer
(CEO) of Eastern Air Lines
Eastern Air Lines
from 1975 to 1986. Borman is a recipient of the Congressional Space Medal of Honor
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Apollo 8
Left to right: Lovell, Anders, Borman Apollo program← Apollo 7 Apollo 9 →Apollo 8, the second manned spaceflight mission in the United States Apollo space program, was launched on December 21, 1968, and became the first manned spacecraft to leave Earth
Earth
orbit, reach the Earth's Moon, orbit it and return safely to Earth. The three-astronaut crew — Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot James Lovell, and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders
William Anders
— became the first humans to: travel beyond low Earth
Earth
orbit; see Earth
Earth
as a whole planet; enter the gravity well of another celestial body (Earth's moon); orbit another celestial body (Earth's moon); directly see the far side of the Moon with their own eyes; witness an Earthrise; escape the gravity of another celestial body (Earth's moon); and re-enter the gravitational well of Earth
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Rusty Schweickart
Russell Louis "Rusty" Schweickart (also Schweikart; born October 25, 1935) is an American aeronautical engineer, and a former NASA astronaut, research scientist, U.S. Air Force
U.S. Air Force
fighter pilot, as well as a former business executive and government executive. Selected in 1963 for NASA's third astronaut group, he is best known as the Lunar Module Pilot on the 1969 Apollo 9
Apollo 9
mission, the first manned flight test of the Lunar Module, on which he performed the first in-space test of the Portable Life Support System
Portable Life Support System
used by the Apollo astronauts who walked on the Moon. As backup Commander of the first manned Skylab
Skylab
mission in 1973, he was responsible for developing the hardware and procedures used by the first crew to perform critical in-flight repairs of the Skylab
Skylab
station
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