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Motion Picture
A film, also called a movie, motion picture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images. (See the glossary of motion picture terms.) This optical illusion causes the audience to perceive continuous motion between separate objects viewed in rapid succession. The process of filmmaking is both an art and an industry
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Delayed Release (film)
An art release is the premiere of an artistic production and its presentation and marketing to the public.Contents1 Film1.1 Delayed release2 Music 3 See alsoFilm[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Film
Film
premieres can be elaborate media events, such as this 2012 exhibition of Celebration Day with promotional artwork on the Hammersmith ApolloA film release is the authorization by the owner of a completed film to a public exhibition of the film. The exhibition may be in theatres or for home viewing. A film's release date and the method of release is part of the marketing of the film. It may be a wide or limited release. The process may involve finding a film distributor
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Re-recording (filmmaking)
Re-recording is the process by which the audio track of a film or video production is created. As sound elements are mixed and combined together the process necessitates "re-recording" all of the audio elements, such as dialogue, music, sound effects, by the sound re-recording mixer(s) to achieve the desired end result, which is the final soundtrack that the audience hears when the finished film is played.This filmmaking article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article needs additional or more specific categories
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Film Inventory Report
The Film
Film
Inventory Report or Daily Raw Stock Log is a filmmaking term for a report produced by the clapper loader each day
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Daily Call Sheet
The daily call sheet is a filmmaking term for the schedule crafted by the assistant director, using the director's shot list. It is issued to the cast and crew of a film production to inform them of where and when they should report for a particular day of filming.[1][2] The production schedule is listed by call time, the time when people are expected to start work on a film set. Information found on call sheets[edit] Call sheets include other useful information such as contact information (e.g. phone numbers of crew members and other contacts), the schedule for the day, which scenes and script pages are being shot, and the address of the shoot location. Call sheets have information about cast transportation arrangements, parking instructions and safety notes. Call sheets may also provide logistical information regarding the location
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Production Report
A production report ("PR") is a filmmaking term for the form filled out each day of production of a movie or television show to summarize what occurred that day. There is no standard template for a production report, and each show usually has an original template, often created before production begins by one of the assistant directors ("AD"). Besides superficial differences, most forms record the same information and are simply a series of blank tables created in Excel printed doublesided on a legal sized (8 x 14 inch) sheet of paper. The purpose of this form is to keep track of a production's progress and expenses and to help determine what salary is owed to the cast and crew
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Daily Production Report
A daily production report (DPR) or production report (PR) is a filmmaking term for the form filled out each day of production for a movie or television show to summarize what occurred that day. There is no standard template for a production report and each show usually has an original template, often created before production begins by one of the assistant directors. Besides superficial differences, most forms record the same information and are simply a series of blank tables created in Excel printed double-sided on a legal sized (8 x 14) sheet of paper. The purpose of this form is to keep track of a production's progress and expenses. It is finally sent to studio executives and is permanently filed to serve as a legal record. Front[edit] The very top lists the production company name, production title, director, producers, unit production managers, assistant directors, the total number of scheduled production days, and the current production day
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Daily Progress Report
A daily progress report is a filmmaking report that is produced at the end of each shooting day by the First Assistant Director (1AD) and passed to the Production Manager for approval. The daily progress report contains a record of what scenes were shot that day, the locations used, the number of meals served, the vehicles and equipment utilised and any other notable events or incidents. References[edit]Miller, Pat P. (1998). Script Supervising and Film
Film
Continuity. Focal Press. p. 107
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Daily Editor Log
A script supervisor (also called continuity supervisor) is a member of a film crew and oversees the continuity of the motion picture including wardrobe, props, set dressing, hair, makeup and the actions of the actors during a scene. The notes recorded by the script supervisor during the shooting of a scene are used to help the editor cut the scene. They are also responsible for keeping track of the film production unit's daily progress. The script supervisor credit typically appears in the closing credits of a motion picture and is listed on IMDB under miscellaneous crew. In the most basic description, the script supervisor is the editor's and writer's representative on set, as well as being the right hand aide to the director and the director of photography. It is the script supervisor's job to make sure that at the end of the day the film can be cut together
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Sound Report
A sound report is a filmmaking term for a sheet of paper created by the Sound Mixer to record details of each file recorded during filming. A sound report is arranged in a table format, where the rows represent each file recorded, which at the least would contain columns for noting down the scene, slate or shot and take number, and a wider column for remarks about the particular take's sound. A report would typically note the title of the production, the date, the audio roll or tape that the file is recorded on, tape speed or sample rate, bit depth, and timecode information
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Cost Report
There are several different types of cost reports. One type of cost report is a filmmaking term for a weekly report, compiled by the Production Accountant, detailing the costs to date, costs this week and estimate of the costs to complete the film. Medicare cost reports must be completed yearly by facilities such as nursing homes, home health agencies, and hospices in order to remain compliant with CMS regulations.[1] They must be filed once a year, generally five months after the close of the facility's fiscal year.[2] There are many other types that are related to multiple fields of work.v t eFilmmakingDevelopment Film
Film
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Post-production
Post-production
Post-production
is part of the process of filmmaking, video production, and photography
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Sync Sound
Sync sound (synchronized sound recording) refers to sound recorded at the time of the filming of movies. It has been widely used in movies since the birth of sound movies. [1]Contents1 History 2 Pioneering films 3 Sync sound in Asia 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Even in the silent film era, films were shown with sounds, often with musical accompaniment by a pianist or an orchestra keeping time with the screen action. The first synchronization was a turning recording device marked with a white spot. As the white spot rotated, the cameraman hand cranked the camera to keep it in sync with the recording. The method was then repeated for playback, but with the projectionist hand cranking the film projector
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Film (other)
A film is a story conveyed with moving images. Film or Films may also refer to: Materials[edit]Film stock, the medium used for motion picture photography Photographic film, the medium used to capture pictures with a camera Biological membrane, a thin layer in living organisms Thin film, a thin layer in physics and science Biofilm, a group of microorganisms in which cells stick to each other on a surface Coating, a thin chemical covering Plastic film, thin plastic used in packaging and other industriesArts[edit]The Film, a Bollywood film by Junaid Memon Film (film), a movie written by Samuel Beckett Film (band), a Croatian music group "Film", a song by P-MODEL from the album Potpourri "Films", a song by Gary Numan from the album The Pleasure PrincipleFilm review[edit]Film (Iranian magazine), a film review magazine Film (Polish magazine), a film review magazine /Film (pronounced "slashfilm"), a film news and review blog Film..., a BBC film review show t
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Film Score
A film score (also sometimes called background score, background music, film soundtrack, film music, or incidental music) is original music written specifically to accompany a film
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Special Effect
Special
Special
effects (often abbreviated as SFX, SPFX, or simply FX) are illusions or visual tricks used in the film, television, theatre, video game and simulator industries to simulate the imagined events in a story or virtual world. Special
Special
effects are traditionally divided into the categories of optical effects and mechanical effects. With the emergence of digital film-making a distinction between special effects and visual effects has grown, with the latter referring to digital post-production while "special effects" referring to mechanical and optical effects. Mechanical effects (also called practical or physical effects) are usually accomplished during the live-action shooting. This includes the use of mechanized props, scenery, scale models, animatronics, pyrotechnics and atmospheric effects: creating physical wind, rain, fog, snow, clouds, making a car appear to drive by itself and blowing up a building, etc
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