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Moshe Teitelbaum (ujhel)
Rabbi Moshe Teitelbaum (1759 – 17 July 1841) (Hebrew: משה טייטלבוים‬), also known as the Yismach Moshe, was the Rebbe of Ujhely (Sátoraljaújhely) in Hungary. According to Leopold Löw, he signed his name "Tamar", this being the equivalent of Teitelbaum, which is the Yiddish
Yiddish
for "palm-tree" (compare German "Dattelbaum").[1] An adherent of the Polish Hasidic
Hasidic
Rebbe, the Chozeh of Lublin (as well as of Rabbi Sholom Rokeach of Belz[2]), Rabbi Teitelbaum was instrumental in bringing Hasidic Judaism
Hasidic Judaism
to Hungary
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Moshe Teitelbaum (Satmar)
Rabbi Moshe (Moses) Teitelbaum (November 1, 1914 – April 24, 2006) was a Hasidic rebbe and the world leader of the Satmar Hasidim.Contents1 Early life 2 Post-war 3 Appointment to Satmar Rebbe 4 As Satmar Rebbe 5 Succession 6 Death 7 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Moshe Teitelbaum was born on November 17, 1914 in Újfehértó, Hungary.[1] He was the second son of Rabbi Chaim Tzvi Teitelbaum, author of Atzei Chaim, the previous Sigheter Rebbe.[2][3] His mother Bracha Sima, hailed from the prominent Halbershtam family.[3] Moshe and his older brother, Yekusiel Yehuda Teitelbaum, were orphaned in 1926, when they were eleven and fourteen, respectively.[3] Moshe was raised by family friends and relatives, including his uncle, Joel Teitelbaum, and his grandfather, Rabbi Shulem Eliezer Halberstam of Ratzfert.[3][4] Teitalbaum received rabbinical ordination and was appointed dean of the Karacscka yeshiva.[3] In 1936, Teitelbaum married his cousin Leah Meir, daughter of Rabbi H
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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Jacob
Jacob
Jacob
(/ˈdʒeɪkəb/; Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב‬, Modern  Ya‘aqōv (help·info), Tiberian Yā‘āqōḇ), later given the name Israel, is regarded as a Patriarch
Patriarch
of the Israelites. According to the Book of Genesis, Jacob
Jacob
was the third Hebrew progenitor with whom God
God
made a covenant. He is the son of Isaac
Isaac
and Rebecca, the grandson of Abraham, Sarah
Sarah
and Bethuel, the nephew of Ishmael, and the younger twin brother of Esau. Jacob
Jacob
had twelve sons and at least one daughter, by his two wives, Leah
Leah
and Rachel, and by their handmaidens Bilhah and Zilpah. Jacob's twelve sons, named in Genesis, were Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, and Benjamin
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Moses
Moses
Moses
(/ˈmoʊzɪz, -zɪs/)[2][Note 1] was a prophet in the Abrahamic religions. According to the Hebrew Bible, he was adopted by an Egyptian princess, and later in life became the leader of the Israelites
Israelites
and lawgiver, to whom the authorship of the Torah, or acquisition of the Torah
Torah
from Heaven is traditionally attributed
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Solomon's Temple
According to the Hebrew Bible, Solomon's Temple, also known as the First Temple, was the Holy Temple (Hebrew: בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ‬: Beit HaMikdash) in ancient Jerusalem
Jerusalem
before its destruction by Nebuchadnezzar II
Nebuchadnezzar II
after the Siege of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
of 587 BCE and its subsequent replacement with the Second Temple in the 6th century BCE. The Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
states that the temple was constructed under Solomon, king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah and that during the Kingdom of Judah, the temple was dedicated to Yahweh, and is said to have housed the Ark of the Covenant
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Jeremiah
Jeremiah
Jeremiah
(/dʒɛrɪˈmaɪ.ə/;[1] Hebrew: יִרְמְיָהוּ‬, Modern: Yirmeyahu  [jiʁmeˈjahu], Tiberian: Yirmĭyāhū; Greek: Ἰερεμίας; Arabic: إرميا‎ Irmiyā meaning "Yah Exalts"), also called the "Weeping prophet",[2] was one of the major prophets of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Old Testament). According to Jewish tradition, Jeremiah
Jeremiah
authored the Book of Jeremiah, the Books of Kings and the Book of Lamentations,[3] with the assistance and under the editorship of Baruch ben Neriah, his scribe and disciple. Greater detail is known about Jeremiah's life than for that of any other prophet
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Yekusiel Yehuda Teitelbaum (I)
Rabbi Yekusiel Yehuda Teitelbaum (1808–1883), known as the Yetev Lev (Hebrew: ייטב לב‬) pronounced Yitev Lev by many, based on the two Yuds of his initials),[1][2] was a Hasidic Rebbe
Rebbe
in Austria-Hungary.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Family life 4 Teachings and published works 5 SourcesEarly life and education[edit] He was the son of Rabbi Elazar Nison Teitelbaum, rabbi of Drubitsh, who was the son of the Yismach Moshe
Yismach Moshe
(Moshe Teitelbaum). Career[edit] After his studies, Yekusiel Yehuda, also known by his Yiddish equivalent names as Zalman Leib, was appointed as the rabbi of Stropkov
Stropkov
(1833). He moved to Ujhely
Ujhely
(1841) and then to Drubitsh (1856). When the Jewish community in the city of Sighet, Hungary, was looking for a new rabbi, he was invited by the heads of the community[3] and was appointed to that post in 1858
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Jewish Messiah
In Judaism, messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎, translit. māšîaḥ; Greek: χριστός, translit. khristós, lit. 'anointed, covered in oil') is a title for a savior and liberator of the Jewish people
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Third Temple
If built, the Third Temple
Temple
(Hebrew: בית המקדש השלישי‎, Beit haMikdash haShlishi, literally: The House, the Holy, the Third) would be the third Jewish
Jewish
temple in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
after Solomon's Temple and the rebuilt Second Temple
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Shabbat
Shabbat
Shabbat
(/ʃəˈbɑːt/; Hebrew: שַׁבָּת‎ [ʃa'bat], "rest" or "cessation") or Shabbos (['ʃa.bəs], Yiddish: שבת‎) or the Sabbath
Sabbath
is Judaism's day of rest and seventh day of the week, on which religious Jews, Samaritans and certain Christians (such as Seventh-day Adventists and Seventh Day Baptists) remember the Biblical creation of the heavens and the earth in six days and the Exodus of the Hebrews, and look forward to a future Messianic Age. Shabbat
Shabbat
observance entails refraining from work activities, often with great rigor, and engaging in restful activities to honor the day. Judaism's traditional position is that unbroken seventh-day Shabbat
Shabbat
originated among the Jewish people, as their first and most sacred institution, though some suggest other origins
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Teitelbaum
Teitelbaum (Hebrew: טײטלבױם‬; teytlboym, deriving from a Yiddish/Germanic word meaning "date palm [tree]") is a Jewish surname, which may refer to:Look up טייטלבוים in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Aaron Teitelbaum (b. 1948), Satmar rebbe Benjamin R
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Isidore Singer
Isidore Singer (10 November 1859, Hranice/Přerov District, Moravia, Austria – 1939, New York City) was an editor of the Jewish Encyclopedia and founder of the American League for the Rights of Man.Contents1 Biography1.1 France 1.2 New York2 Religious views 3 Publications 4 References4.1 SourcesBiography[edit] He was born in 1859 in Weisskirchen, Moravia, in the Austrian Empire (today, Hranice/Přerov District, Czech Republic). Singer studied at the Universities of Vienna
Vienna
and Berlin, receiving his Ph.D. in 1884.[1] France[edit] After editing the Allgemeine oesterreichische Literaturzeitung [Austrian literary newspaper] from 1885 to 1886, he became literary secretary to the French ambassador in Vienna.[2] From 1887, he worked in Paris
Paris
in the press bureau of the French foreign office and was active in the campaign on behalf of Alfred Dreyfus
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Gilgulim
Gilgul/Gilgul neshamot/Gilgulei Ha Neshamot (Heb. גלגול הנשמות, Plural: גלגולים Gilgulim) describes a Kabbalistic concept of reincarnation. In Hebrew, the word gilgul means "cycle" or "wheel" and neshamot is the plural for "souls." Souls are seen to "cycle" through "lives" or "incarnations", being attached to different human bodies over time. Which body they associate with depends on their particular task in the physical world, spiritual levels of the bodies of predecessors and so on. The concept relates to the wider processes of history in Kabbalah, involving Cosmic Tikkun (Messianic rectification), and the historical dynamic of ascending Lights and descending Vessels from generation to generation
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Ludwig Venetianer
Ludwig Venetianer (Hungarian: Venetianer Lajos) (May 19, 1867, Kecskemét - November 25, 1922, Újpest) was a Hungarian rabbi and writer.Contents1 Biography 2 Literary works 3 Bibliography 4 SourcesBiography[edit] Venetianer was born in Kecskemét. He studied at the rabbinical seminary and the University of Budapest, at the Jewish Theological Seminary (Breslau) and the University of Breslau, 1888-89 (Ph.D. 1890, Budapest). Receiving his diploma as rabbi from the Budapest University of Jewish Studies in 1892, he officiated as rabbi at Somogy-Csurgó from that year to 1895, holding at the same time the chair of Hungarian and German literatures at the Evangelical Reform Gymnasium of that city. In 1895 he was called to the rabbinate of Lugos, and in the following year to the rabbinate of Újpest near Budapest
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Jewish Encyclopedia
The Jewish Encyclopedia[n 1] is an English encyclopedia containing over 15,000 articles on the history, culture, and state of Judaism
Judaism
and the Jews
Jews
up to the early 20th century.[1] It was originally published in 12 volumes by Funk and Wagnalls
Funk and Wagnalls
of New York City
New York City
between 1901 and 1906 and reprinted in the 1960s by KTAV Publishing House. The work's scholarship is still highly regarded: the American Jewish Archives
American Jewish Archives
has called it "the most monumental Jewish scientific work of modern times"[2] and Rabbi
Rabbi
Joshua L
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