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Morristown, New Jersey
Morristown is a town and county seat of Morris County, New Jersey, United States.[19] Morristown has been called "the military capital of the American Revolution" because of its strategic role in the war for independence from Great Britain.[20][21] Today this history is visible in a variety of locations throughout the town that collectively make up Morristown National Historical Park. According to British colonial records, the first permanent European settlement at Morristown occurred in 1715, when a settlement was founded as New Hanover by migrants from New York and Connecticut. Morris County was created on March 15, 1739, from portions of Hunterdon County
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Inoculation
The terms inoculation, vaccination and immunization are often used synonymously to refer to artificial induction of immunity against various infectious diseases. This is supported by some dictionaries.[1][2][3] However, there are some important historical and current differences. In English medicine, inoculation referred only to the practice of variolation until the very early 1800s. When Edward Jenner
Edward Jenner
introduced smallpox vaccine in 1798, this was initially called cowpox inoculation or vaccine inoculation. Soon, to avoid confusion, smallpox inoculation continued to be referred to as variolation (from variola = smallpox) and cowpox inoculation was referred to as vaccination (from Jenner's use of variolae vaccinae = smallpox of the cow). Then, in 1891 Louis Pasteur
Louis Pasteur
proposed that the terms vaccine and vaccination should be extended to include the new protective procedures being developed
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Lenape
The Lenape
Lenape
(English: /ləˈnɑːpi/ or /ˈlɛnəpi/),[8] also called the Leni Lenape,[9] Lenni Lenape
Lenape
and
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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County Seat
A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in the United States, Canada, Romania, Mainland China
Mainland China
and Taiwan. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.Contents1 Function 2 U.S. counties with more than one county seat 3 Other variations3.1 New England 3.2 Virginia 3.3 South Dakota 3.4 Louisiana 3.5 Alaska 3.6 Canada
Canada
and Vermont4 Lists of U.S. county seats by state 5 Lists of Taiwan
Taiwan
county seats by county 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFunction[edit] In most of the United States, counties are the political subdivisions of a state. The city, town, or populated place that houses county government is known as the seat of its respective county
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New Jersey Legislature
The New Jersey
New Jersey
Legislature
Legislature
is the legislative branch of the government of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New Jersey. In its current form, as defined by the New Jersey
New Jersey
Constitution of 1947, the Legislature
Legislature
consists of two houses: the General Assembly and the Senate. The Legislature
Legislature
meets in the New Jersey
New Jersey
State House, in the state capital of Trenton
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2000 United States Census
[[File:Seal of the United States Census
United States Census
Bur tion = U.S. Census Bureau Sealframeless]]Census LogoGeneral informationCountry United StatesDate taken April 1, 2000Total population 281,421,906Percent change 13.2%Most populous state California 33,871,648Least populous state Wyoming 493,782The Twenty-second United States
United States
Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2% over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 Census.[1] This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.[2] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 2000 census, which contained over 100 questions
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1990 United States Census
The Twenty-first United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9.8 percent over the 226,545,805 persons enumerated during the 1980 Census.[1] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1990 census, which contained over 100 questions. Full documentation on the 1990 census, including census forms and a procedural history, is available from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. It was the first census to designate "Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander" as a racial group separate from Asians. To increase black participation in the 1990 United States
United States
Census, the bureau recruited Bill Cosby, Magic Johnson, Alfre Woodard, and Miss America Debbye Turner
Debbye Turner
as spokespeople.[2] The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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UTC-4
UTC−04:00 is a time offset that subtracts 4 hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). It is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
(e.g., Canada
Canada
and the United States) during the warm months of daylight saving time, as Eastern Daylight Time. The Atlantic Time Zone
Atlantic Time Zone
observes it during standard time (cold months)
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New Netherland
New Netherland
New Netherland
(Dutch: Nieuw Nederland; Latin: Nova Belgica or Novum Belgium) was a 17th-century colony of the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
that was located on the East Coast of North America. The claimed territories extended from the Delmarva Peninsula
Delmarva Peninsula
to extreme southwestern Cape Cod, while the more limited settled areas are now part of the Mid-Atlantic States of New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Connecticut, with small outposts in Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and Rhode Island. The colony was conceived by the Dutch West India Company
Dutch West India Company
(WIC) in 1621 to capitalize on the North American fur trade. It was settled slowly at first because of policy mismanagement by the WIC and conflicts with American Indians
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Province Of New Jersey
The Province of New Jersey
New Jersey
was one of the Middle Colonies
Middle Colonies
of Colonial America and became the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New Jersey
New Jersey
in 1776. The province had originally been settled by Europeans as part of New Netherland, but came under English rule after the surrender of Fort Amsterdam
Fort Amsterdam
in 1664, becoming a proprietary colony. The English then renamed the province after the Isle of Jersey
Isle of Jersey
in the English Channel. The Dutch Republic reasserted control for a brief period in 1673–1674. After that it consisted of two political divisions, East Jersey
East Jersey
and West Jersey, until they were united as a royal colony in 1702
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Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
is a part of the Reformed tradition
Reformed tradition
within Protestantism
Protestantism
which traces its origins to the British Isles, particularly Scotland. Presbyterian churches derive their name from the presbyterian form of church government, which is governed by representative assemblies of elders. A great number of Reformed churches
Reformed churches
are organized this way, but the word Presbyterian, when capitalized, is often applied uniquely to churches that trace their roots to the Scottish and English Presbyterians, as well as several English dissenter groups that formed during the English Civil War.[2] Presbyterian theology typically emphasizes the sovereignty of God, the authority of the Scriptures, and the necessity of grace through faith in Christ
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Southold, New York
The Town of Southold is one of ten towns in Suffolk
Suffolk
County, New York, United States. It is located in the northeastern tip of the county, on the North Fork of Long Island. The population was 21,968 at the 2010 census
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