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Morris CDSW
The Morris CDSW
Morris CDSW
6x4 was a six-wheeled artillery tractor brought into service in the early to mid-1930s by the British Army
British Army
to tow its field guns.[1][2] Typically it was used to pull the 18-pounder field gun and the 4.5-inch howitzer, and later the 25-pounder gun-howitzer which replaced those two weapons. It was also used, with a modified body, for hauling the 40mm Bofors in the Light Anti-Aircraft (LAA) regiments. A version equipped with a crane was used for "breakdown" work
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Artillery Tractor
An artillery tractor, also referred to as a gun tractor, is a specialized heavy-duty form of tractor unit used to tow artillery pieces of varying weights and calibres. It may be wheeled, tracked, or half-tracked.Contents1 Traction 2 History2.1 World War I 2.2 World War II 2.3 Modern warfare3 List of artillery tractors3.1 Wheeled 3.2 Half-tracked 3.3 Tracked, tank chassis 3.4 Tracked, other chassis4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 Further reading 7 External linksTraction[edit] There are two main types of artillery tractors, depending on the type of traction: wheeled and tracked.Wheeled tractors are usually variations of lorries adapted for military service. Tracked tractors run on continuous track; in some cases are built on a modified tank chassis with the superstructure replaced with a compartment for the gun crew or ammunition.In addition, half-track tractors were used in the interwar period and in World War II, especially by the Wehrmacht
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Gun-howitzer
Gun-howitzer (also referred to as gun howitzer) is a type of artillery weapon that is intended to fulfill both the role of ordinary cannon or field gun, and that of a howitzer.[1] It is thus able to convey both direct and indirect fire.[1] To be able to serve as a howitzer, gun-howitzers are typically built to achieve up to 60—70° of elevation. For effective direct fire, the gun-howitzers typically employ a fairly long barrel, usually not shorter than 30 calibres. Its ammunition also has a high muzzle velocity and often large calibre (often exceeding 120 mm).[1] Historically the first gun-howitzer was the French canon obusier of 19th century
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Bofors 40 Mm Gun
The Bofors
Bofors
40 mm gun, often referred to simply as the Bofors gun,[2] is an anti-aircraft/multi-purpose autocannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most popular medium-weight anti-aircraft systems during World War II, used by most of the western Allies as well as by the Axis powers. A small number of these weapons remain in service to this day, and saw action as late as the Gulf War. In the post-war era the original design was not suitable for action against jet powered aircraft, so Bofors
Bofors
introduced a new model of significantly more power, the 40 mm L/70. In spite of sharing almost nothing with the original design other than the calibre and the distinctive conical flash hider, this weapon is also widely known simply as "the Bofors"
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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QF 4.5-inch Howitzer
The Ordnance QF 4.5-inch howitzer
QF 4.5-inch howitzer
was the standard British Empire field (or ‘light’) howitzer of the First World War
First World War
era. It replaced the BL 5-inch howitzer
BL 5-inch howitzer
and equipped some 25% of the field artillery. It entered service in 1910 and remained in service through the interwar period and was last used in the field by British forces in early 1942. It was generally horse drawn until mechanisation in the 1930s. The QF 4.5-inch howitzer
QF 4.5-inch howitzer
was used by British and Commonwealth forces in most theatres, by Russia and by British troops in Russia in 1919. Its calibre (114 mm) and hence shell weight were greater than those of the equivalent German field howitzer (105 mm); France did not have an equivalent
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Field Gun
A field gun is a field artillery piece. Originally the term referred to smaller guns that could accompany a field army on the march, that when in combat could be moved about the battlefield in response to changing circumstances (field artillery), as opposed to guns installed in a fort (garrison artillery or coastal artillery), or to siege cannons and mortars which are too large to be moved quickly, and would be used only in a prolonged siege. Perhaps the most famous use of the field gun in terms of advanced tactics was Napoleon Bonaparte's use of very large wheels on the guns that allowed them to be moved quickly even during a battle
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Vehicle Armour
Military vehicles are commonly armoured (or armored; see spelling differences) to withstand the impact of shrapnel, bullets, missiles or shells, protecting the personnel inside from enemy fire. Such vehicles include armoured fighting vehicles like tanks, aircraft and ships. Civilian vehicles may also be armoured. These vehicles include cars used by reporters, officials and others in conflict zones or where violent crime is common, and presidential limousines. Civilian armoured cars are also routinely used by security firms to carry money or valuables to reduce the risk of highway robbery or the hijacking of the cargo. Armour
Armour
may also be used in vehicles to protect from threats other than a deliberate attack. Some spacecraft are equipped with specialised armour to protect them against impacts from micrometeoroids or fragments of space junk
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Morris Commercial Cars
Morris Commercial Cars
Morris Commercial Cars
Limited was a British manufacturer of commercial vehicles formed by William Morris, founder of Morris Motors Limited, to continue the business of E G Wrigley and Company which he purchased as of 1 January 1924.Contents1 History 2 Taxicabs 3 Vehicles 4 Notes 5 External linksHistory[edit] Morris bought the assets of
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Austin K2/Y
The Austin K2/Y
Austin K2/Y
is a British heavy military ambulance that was used by all Commonwealth services during the Second World War. Built by Austin, it was based on the civilian light truck Austin K30, differing mainly by having simple canvas closures in place of driver's cab doors. The K2/Y could take ten casualties sitting or four stretcher cases. The rear body, known as No. 2 Mk I/L was developed by the Royal Army Medical Corps and built by coachbuilder Mann Egerton. The interior dimensions were approximately 2.6 metres long, 2.0 metres wide and 1.7 metres high. At the rear of the vehicle there were two large doors. From the driver's cab the wounded could also be accessed through a small internal door with a seat
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Tilly (vehicle)
Tilly (from "Utility") was the name given to a number of British military vehicles produced during World War II
World War II
from civilian car designs and used by all of the armed forces in most theatres of that conflict.Austin TillyHillman TillyContents1 History 2 Cars on which the Tilly was based 3 Successor vehicles 4 Preserved examples 5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Bibliography7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Ford Fordor
The Ford Fordor, known officially as the Ford C11ADF, Station Wagon/Heavy Utility, 4x2,[1] was a militarized station wagon used in the North African Campaign
North African Campaign
of World War II. They often had roof hatches and sometimes were roofless.Ford C11Body and chassisBody style Station wagonPowertrainEngine 239 cubic inch V8Transmission 3-speed gearboxDimensionsWheelbase 114 inchesLength 194 inchesWidth 79 inchesHeight 72 inchesCurb weight 4230 poundsReferences[edit]^ Vanderveen, Bart (1989)
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