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Morgan Bible
The Morgan Bible
Bible
(The Pierpont Morgan Library, New York, Ms M. 638), also called the Crusader Bible
Bible
or Maciejowski Bible, is a medieval picture Bible
Bible
of 46 folios. The book consists of paintings of events from Hebrew
Hebrew
scripture, set in the scenery and customs of thirteenth-century France, depicted from a Christian
Christian
perspective. Scenes are surrounded by text in three scripts and five languages: Latin, Persian, Arabic, Judeo-Persian, and Hebrew. Forty three folios are kept in the Pierpont Morgan Library. Two folios are kept in the Bibliothèque nationale de France. A single folio is kept in the J
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Israelite
The Israelites
Israelites
(/ˈɪzriəˌlaɪtsˌ/; Hebrew: בני ישראל‎ Bnei Yisra'el)[1] were a confederation of Iron Age
Iron Age
Semitic-speaking tribes of the ancient Near East, who inhabited a part of Canaan
Canaan
during the tribal and monarchic periods.[2][3][4][5][6] According to the religious narrative of the Hebrew Bible, the Israelites' origin is traced back to the Biblical patriarchs and matriarchs Abraham
Abraham
and his wife Sarah, through their son Isaac
Isaac
and his wife Rebecca, and their son Jacob
Jacob
who was later called Israel, from whence they derive their name, with his wives Leah
Leah
and Rachel. Modern archaeology has largely discarded the historicity of the religious narrative,[7] with it being reframed as constituting an inspiring national myth narrative
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Judeo-Persian
Judeo-Persian, or Jidi (/ˈdʒiːdiː/; also spelled Dzhidi or Djudi), refers to both a group of Jewish dialects
Jewish dialects
spoken by the Jews living in Iran
Iran
and Judeo-Persian texts (written in Hebrew alphabet)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Sydney Cockerell
Sir Sydney Carlyle Cockerell (16 July 1867 – 1 May 1962) was an English museum curator and collector. From 1908 to 1937 he was director of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, in Britain.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Sources 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] Sydney Cockerell made his way initially as clerk in the family coal business, George J. Cockerell & Co, until he met John Ruskin. Around 1887, Cockerell sent Ruskin some sea shells, which he collected.[1] At that time he had already met William Morris. Cockerell tried to patch up a quarrel between Ruskin and Octavia Hill,[2], who had been a friend of his late father Sydney John Cockerell, and godmother to his sister Olive. From 1891, Cockerell gained a more solid entry to intellectual circles, working for the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings. The architect Detmar Blow
Detmar Blow
was a friend
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Abbas I (Shah Of Persia)
Shāh Abbās the Great or Shāh Abbās I of Persia (Persian: شاه عباس بزرگ‎; 27 January 1571 – 19 January 1629) was the 5th Safavid Shah (king) of Iran, and is generally considered the strongest ruler of the Safavid dynasty. He was the third son of Shah Mohammad Khodabanda.[1] Although Abbas would preside over the apex of Iran's military, political and economic power, he came to the throne during a troubled time for the Safavid Empire. Under his weak-willed father, the country was riven with discord between the different factions of the Qizilbash army, who killed Abbas' mother and elder brother. Meanwhile, Iran's enemies, the Ottoman Empire (its archrival) and the Uzbeks, exploited this political chaos to seize territory for themselves. In 1588, one of the Qizilbash leaders, Murshid Qoli Khan, overthrew Shah Mohammed in a coup and placed the 16-year-old Abbas on the throne
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Bishop Of Kraków
The Archbishop
Archbishop
of Kraków
Kraków
is the head of the archdiocese of Kraków. A bishop of Kraków
Kraków
first came into existence when the diocese was created in 1000; it was promoted to an archdiocese on 28 October 1925. Due to Kraków's role as Poland's political, cultural and spiritual center, the bishops and archbishops of Kraków
Kraków
were often very influential in the city, country and abroad
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Bernard Maciejowski
Cardinal Bernard Maciejowski, Ciołek coat of arms
Ciołek coat of arms
(born 1548 – died 19 January 1608 in Kraków), Polish nobleman, starosta, royal standard bearer, statesman and Catholic Church
Catholic Church
leader; Lutsk
Lutsk
Bishop, Archbishop of Kraków, Archbishop of Gniezno
Archbishop of Gniezno
and Primate of Poland
Primate of Poland
(between 1606 – 1608). Biography[edit] Bernard Maciejowski
Bernard Maciejowski
was a scion (descendant) of powerful family, being a son of Bernard Maciejowski, starosta of Trembowla (now Terebovlia), castelan of Lublin
Lublin
and Radom, and his wife Elżbieta Kamieniecka, Piława coat of arms. His nephew, Samuel Maciejowski, was the Archbishop of Kraków
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Margin (typography)
In typography, a margin is the area between the main content of a page and the page edges.[1] The margin helps to define where a line of text begins and ends. When a page is justified the text is spread out to be flush with the left and right margins. When two pages of content are combined next to each other (known as a two-page spread), the space between the two pages is known as the gutter.[2] (Any space between columns of text is a gutter.) The top and bottom margins of a page are also called "head" and "foot", respectively. The term "margin" can also be used to describe the edge of internal content, such as the right or left edge of a column of text.[3] Marks made in the margins are called marginalia.Contents1 History1.1 The Scroll 1.2 The Codex 1.3 The Printed Book 1.4 The Digital Page2 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Scroll[edit] Margins are an important method of organizing the written word, and have a long history
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J. Paul Getty Museum
The J. Paul Getty
J. Paul Getty
Museum, commonly referred to as the Getty, is an art museum in California
California
housed on two campuses: the Getty Center
Getty Center
and Getty Villa. The two locations received over two million visitors in 2016.[1] The Getty Center
Getty Center
is in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles and is the primary location of the museum. The collection features Western art from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to the present. The museum's second location, the Getty Villa, is in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood (though self-claims in the city of Malibu[2]) and displays art from ancient Greece, Rome, and Etruria.[3]Contents1 History 2 GettyGuide 3 The controversies with Italy
Italy
and Greece 4 Selected collection highlights 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] In 1974, J
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Hebrew
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Arabic
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Ai (Bible)
Ai (Hebrew: הָעַי‎ hā-‘āy "heap of ruins"; Douay-Rheims: Hai) was a Canaanite city. According to the Book of Joshua in the Hebrew Bible, it was conquered by the Israelites on their second attempt. The ruins of the city are popularly thought to be in the modern-day archeological site Et-Tell.Contents1 Biblical narrative 2 Possible locations 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiblical narrative[edit] According to Genesis, Abraham built an altar between Bethel and Ai.[1] In the Book of Joshua, chapters 7 and 8, the Israelites attempt to conquer Ai on two occasions. The first, in Joshua 7, fails. The Biblical account portrays the failure as being due to a prior sin of Achan, for which he is stoned to death by the Israelites. On the second attempt, in Joshua 8, Joshua, who is identified by the narrative as the leader of the Israelites, receives instruction from God
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Persian Language
Persian (/ˈpɜːrʒən/ or /ˈpɜːrʃən/), also known by its endonym Farsi[8][9] (فارسی fārsi [fɒːɾˈsiː] ( listen)), is one of the Western Iranian languages within the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is primarily spoken in Iran, Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(officially known as Dari since 1958),[10] and Tajikistan
Tajikistan
(officially known as Tajiki since the Soviet era),[11] and some other regions which historically were Persianate societies and considered part of Greater Iran
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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