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Moreton Bay
The Moreton Bay
Moreton Bay
is a bay located on the eastern coast of Australia 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) from central Brisbane, Queensland. It is one of Queensland's most important coastal resources.[1] The waters of Moreton Bay
Moreton Bay
are a popular destination for recreational anglers and are used by commercial operators who provide seafood to market. The Port of Brisbane
Brisbane
coordinates large traffic along the shipping channel which crosses the northern section of the bay. The bay serves as a safe approach to the airport and reduces noise pollution over the city to the west of the runway. A number of barge, ferry and water-taxi services also travel over the bay. Moreton Bay
Moreton Bay
was the site of conflict between the indigenous Quandamooka people
Quandamooka people
and early European settlers
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Australian Aborigines
Aboriginal Australians
Australians
are legally defined as people who are members "of the Aboriginal race of Australia" (indigenous to mainland Australia or to the island of Tasmania).[3][4][5][6]Contents1 Legal and administrative definitions1.1 Definitions from Aboriginal Australians 1.2 Definitions from academia2 Origins 3 Health3.1 Tobacco
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Barrier Island
Barrier islands are coastal landforms and a type of dune system that are exceptionally flat or lumpy areas of sand that form by wave and tidal action parallel to the mainland coast. They usually occur in chains, consisting of anything from a few islands to more than a dozen. They are subject to change during storms and other action, but absorb energy and protect the coastlines and create areas of protected waters where wetlands may flourish
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Channel (geography)
In physical geography, a channel is a type of landform consisting of the outline of a path of relatively shallow and narrow body of fluid, most commonly the confine of a river, river delta or strait. The word is cognate to canal, and sometimes shows in this form, e.g. the Hood Canal. Most examples of this are fjords in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
of North America; a notable exception is the Casiquiare canal. All likely share borrowing from Spanish, Portuguese or French. Channels can be either natural or human-made
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Tidal Range
The tidal range is the vertical difference between the high tide and the succeeding low tide. Tides are the rise and fall of sea levels caused by the combined effects of the gravitational forces exerted by the Moon
Moon
and the Sun and the rotation of the Earth. The tidal range is not constant but changes depending on the locations of the sun and the moon. The most extreme tidal range occurs during spring tides, when the gravitational forces of both the Sun
Sun
and Moon
Moon
are aligned (syzygy), reinforcing each other in the same direction ([new moon]]) or in opposite directions (full moon). During neap tides, when the Moon
Moon
and Sun's gravitational force vectors act in quadrature (making a right angle to the Earth's orbit), the difference between high and low tides is smaller. Neap tides occur during the first and last quarters of the moon's phases
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Embayment
A bay is a recessed, coastal body of water that directly connects to a larger main body of water, such as an ocean, lake, or another bay.[1][2][3] A large bay is usually called a gulf, sea, sound, or bight. A cove is a type of smaller bay with a circular inlet and narrow entrance. A fjord is a particularly steep bay shaped by glacial activity. Bays can be the estuary of a river, such as the Chesapeake Bay, an estuary of the Susquehanna River.[2] Bays may also be nested within each other; for example, James Bay
James Bay
is an arm of Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
in northeastern Canada. Some large bays, such as the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
and the Hudson Bay, have varied marine geology. The land surrounding a bay often reduces the strength of winds and blocks waves. Bays were significant in the history of human settlement because they provided safe places for fishing
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Sediment
Sediment
Sediment
is a naturally occurring material that is broken down by processes of weathering and erosion, and is subsequently transported by the action of wind, water, or ice, and/or by the force of gravity acting on the particles. For example, sand and silt can be carried in suspension in river water and on reaching the sea be deposited by sedimentation and if buried, may eventually become sandstone and siltstone (sedimentary rocks). Sediments are most often transported by water (fluvial processes), but also wind (aeolian processes) and glaciers. Beach sands and river channel deposits are examples of fluvial transport and deposition, though sediment also often settles out of slow-moving or standing water in lakes and oceans. Desert sand dunes and loess are examples of aeolian transport and deposition
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Humus
In soil science, humus (derived in 1790–1800 from the Latin
Latin
humus for earth, ground[1]) denominates the fraction of soil organic matter that is amorphous and without the "cellular cake structure characteristic of plants, micro-organisms or animals."[2] Humus significantly affects the bulk density of soil and contributes to its retention of moisture and nutrients. In agriculture, "humus" sometimes also is used to describe mature or natural compost extracted from a woodland or other spontaneous source for use as a soil conditioner.[3] It is also used to describe a topsoil horizon that contains organic matter (humus type,[4] humus form,[5] humus profile).[6] Humus
Humus
is the dark organic matter that forms in soil when dead plant and animal matter decays. Humus
Humus
has many nutrients that improve the health of soil, nitrogen being the most important
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Q150
Q150
Q150
was the sesquicentenary (150th anniversary) of the Separation of Queensland from New South Wales
New South Wales
in 1859. Separation established the Colony of Queensland
Colony of Queensland
which became the State of Queensland
State of Queensland
in 1901 as part of the Federation of Australia
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Sea Level Rise
A sea level rise is an increase in global mean sea level as a result of an increase in the volume of water in the world’s oceans. Sea level rise is usually attributed to global climate change by thermal expansion of the water in the oceans and by melting of ice sheets and glaciers on land.[3] The melting of floating ice shelves and icebergs at sea would raise sea levels only by about 4 cm (1.6 in).[4] Sea level
Sea level
rise at specific locations may be more or less than the global average. Local factors might include tectonic effects, subsidence of the land, tides, currents, storms, etc.[5] Sea level rise is expected to continue for centuries
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Indigenous Australians
Indigenous Australians
Australians
are the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Torres Strait
Islander people of Australia, descended from groups that existed in Australia and surrounding islands prior to British colonisation. The time of arrival of the first Indigenous Australians
Australians
is a matter of debate among researchers. The earliest definitely human remains found in Australia
Australia
are those of Mungo Man
Mungo Man
LM3 and Mungo Lady, which have been dated to around 50,000 years BP.[2] Recent archaeological evidence from the analysis of charcoal and artifacts revealing human use suggests a date as early as 65,000 B.P.[3][4] Luminescence dating has suggested habitation in Arnhem Land
Arnhem Land
as far back as 60,000 years BP.[5] Genetic research has inferred a date of habitation as early as 80,000 years BP
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Drainage Basin
A drainage basin is any area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet, such as into a river, bay, or other body of water
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Coral Sea
The Coral Sea
Sea
is a marginal sea of the South Pacific off the northeast coast of Australia, and classified as an interim Australian bioregion. The Coral Sea
Sea
extends 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) down the Australian northeast coast. It is bounded in the west by the east coast of Queensland, thereby including the Great Barrier Reef, in the east by Vanuatu
Vanuatu
(formerly the New Hebrides) and by New Caledonia, and in the northeast approximately by the southern extremity of the Solomon Islands. In the northwest, it reaches to the south coast of eastern New Guinea, thereby including the Gulf of Papua
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Whaling In Australia
Whaling in Australian waters began in 1791 when five of the 11 ships in the Third Fleet of settlers to the colony of New South Wales landed their passengers and freight at Sydney Cove and then left Port Jackson to engage in whaling and seal hunting off the coast of Australia and New Zealand. [1] The two main species hunted by such vessels in the early years were right and sperm whales. Later, humpback, bowhead and other species would be taken. [2] Whaling went on to be a major maritime industry in Australia providing work for hundreds of ships and thousands of men and contributing export products worth £4.2 million by 1850
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Captain Cook
Captain James Cook FRS (7 November 1728[NB 1] – 14 February 1779) was a British explorer, navigator, cartographer, and captain in the Royal Navy. Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand. Cook joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years' War, and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec. This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society
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Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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