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Monster Truck
A monster truck is a pickup truck modified with a larger suspension and larger tires, usually for recreational uses. Today pickup trucks are still used, however SUV bodies as well as themed trucks are driven and most of the bodies are now made of fiberglass rather than metal. Themed trucks vary from car bodies, SUV bodies, and even animal themed bodies. A competition monster truck should meet guidelines by being 12 feet tall, 12 feet wide, and as of 2015, should be equipped with specifically made 462lb BKT 66-inch off-road tires. Monster trucks used to be side acts at popular motocross events and mud bogs but today they are usually the main attraction with motocross and mud bogging being the complementary shows.Play mediaA Monster truck
Monster truck
show in 2013 Monster truck
Monster truck
shows typically have two main events, a race and a freestyle competition
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Texas
Texas
Texas
(/ˈtɛksəs/, locally /-sɪz/; Spanish: Texas
Texas
or Tejas [ˈtexas]) is the second largest state in the United States
United States
by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas
Texas
shares borders with the U.S
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Toggle Switch
In electrical engineering, a switch is an electrical component that can "make" or "break" an electrical circuit, interrupting the current or diverting it from one conductor to another.[1][2] The mechanism of a switch removes or restores the conducting path in a circuit when it is operated. It may be operated manually, for example, a light switch or a keyboard button, may be operated by a moving object such as a door, or may be operated by some sensing element for pressure, temperature or flow. A switch will have one or more sets of contacts, which may operate simultaneously, sequentially, or alternately. Switches in high-powered circuits must operate rapidly to prevent destructive arcing, and may include special features to assist in rapidly interrupting a heavy current. Multiple forms of actuators are used for operation by hand or to sense position, level, temperature or flow
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Shock Absorbers
A shock absorber (in reality, a shock "damper") is a mechanical or hydraulic device designed to absorb and damp shock impulses. It does this by converting the kinetic energy of the shock into another form of energy (typically heat) which is then dissipated. Most shock absorbers are a form of dashpot (a damper which resists motion via viscous friction).Contents1 Description1.1 Vehicle suspension2 Early history 3 Types of vehicle shock absorbers3.1 Twin-tube3.1.1 Basic twin-tube 3.1.2 Twin-tube gas charged 3.1.3 Position sensitive damping 3.1.4 Acceleration sensitive damping 3.1.5 Coilover3.2 Mono-tube 3.3 Spool valve4 Theoretical approaches 5 Special
Special
features 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 Bibliography 10 External linksDescription[edit] Pneumatic
Pneumatic
and hydraulic shock absorbers are used in conjunction with cushions and springs
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Arena
An arena, is a covered or not covered enclosed area, often circular or oval-shaped, designed to showcase theater, musical performances, or sporting events. The word derives from Latin harena, a particularly fine/smooth sand used to absorb blood in ancient arenas such as the Colosseum
Colosseum
in Rome, Italy.[1] It is composed of a large open space surrounded on most or all sides by tiered seating for spectators. The key feature of an arena is that the event space is the lowest point, allowing maximum visibility. Arenas are usually designed to accommodate a large number of spectators. The term arena is sometimes used as a synonym for a very large venue such as Pasadena's Rose Bowl, but such a facility is typically called a stadium, especially if it does not have a roof.[citation needed] The use of one term over the other has mostly to do with the type of event
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Methanol
Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol among others, is a chemical with the formula CH3OH (often abbreviated MeOH). Methanol
Methanol
acquired the name wood alcohol because it was once produced chiefly as a byproduct of the destructive distillation of wood. Today, industrial methanol is produced in a catalytic process directly from carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen. Methanol
Methanol
is the simplest alcohol, being only a methyl group linked to a hydroxyl group. It is a light, volatile, colorless, flammable liquid with a distinctive odor very similar to that of ethanol (drinking alcohol).[11] However, unlike ethanol, methanol is highly toxic and unfit for consumption. At room temperature, it is a polar liquid. It is used as an antifreeze, solvent, fuel, and as a denaturant for ethanol
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Engine Displacement
Engine displacement is the swept volume of all the pistons inside the cylinders of a reciprocating engine in a single movement from top dead centre (TDC) to bottom dead centre (BDC). It is commonly specified in cubic centimetres (cc or cm3), litres (l), or cubic inches (CID). Engine displacement does not include the total volume of the combustion chamber.Contents1 Definition 2 Governmental regulations 3 Automotive model names 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Engine displacement is determined from the bore and stroke of an engine's cylinders
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Planetary Gearing
An epicyclic gear train (also known as planetary gear) consists of two gears mounted so that the center of one gear revolves around the center of the other. A carrier connects the centers of the two gears and rotates to carry one gear, called the planet gear, around the other, called the sun gear. The planet and sun gears mesh so that their pitch circles roll without slip. A point on the pitch circle of the planet gear traces an epicycloid curve. In this simplified case, the sun gear is fixed and the planetary gear(s) roll around the sun gear. An epicyclic gear train can be assembled so the planet gear rolls on the inside of the pitch circle of a fixed, outer gear ring, or ring gear, sometimes called an annular gear
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Steering Wheel
A steering wheel (also called a driving wheel or a hand wheel) is a type of steering control in vehicles and vessels (ships and boats). Steering
Steering
wheels are used in most modern land vehicles, including all mass-production automobiles, as well as buses, light and heavy trucks, and tractors. The steering wheel is the part of the steering system that is manipulated by the driver; the rest of the steering system responds to such driver inputs
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Turbo-Hydramatic
Turbo- Hydramatic
Hydramatic
or Turbo Hydra-Matic
Hydra-Matic
is the registered tradename for a family of automatic transmissions developed and produced by General Motors. These transmissions mate a three-element turbine torque converter to a Simpson planetary geartrain, providing three forward speeds plus reverse. The Turbo- Hydramatic
Hydramatic
or Turbo Hydra-Matic
Hydra-Matic
(THM) series was developed to replace both the original Hydra-Matic
Hydra-Matic
models and the Buick Dynaflow. In its original incarnation as the Turbo- Hydramatic
Hydramatic
400, it was first used in the 1964 model year in Cadillacs
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Long Travel Suspension
Long travel suspension is often used in the off road racing industry. Vehicles such as dune buggies, baja racers and rock crawlers use long travel suspension to dampen the effects of, rough, off-road driving conditions.Contents1 Long Travel Suspension Accessories 2 Desert and Rock Racing Suspension 3 External links 4 ReferencesLong Travel Suspension Accessories[edit]Bump Stops - Prevents suspension from bottoming out. Limit Straps - Prevents shocks from extending all the way out. Sway Bars - Stabilizes vehicle around hard turns. Coilover
Coilover
springs - Usually placed over the load-bearing struts, hence the name coilover.Desert and Rock Racing Suspension[edit][1] External links[edit]oristruts.com (Long Travel Suspension Manufacturer) Jathon F.Musella llc.crp.©®[2] References[edit]^ BJ.Baldwin ^ Jensen Bros
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Ford C6 Transmission
The Ford C6 is a heavy-duty automatic transmission built by Ford Motor Company between 1966 and 1996. It was marketed as the "SelectShift Cruise-O-Matic". Compared to its predecessor MX transmission, the C6 offered lower weight, less complexity, less parasitic power loss, and greater torque capacity for larger engines. It did this without exceeding the packaging dimensions of the MX. These design goals were in line with those of the C4 for smaller engines.Contents1 Design 2 E4OD 3 4R100 4 See also 5 ReferencesDesign[edit] To cut down on weight and cost, the C6 featured a simple, three speed Simpson planetary gearset as well as over 10 lb (4.5 kg) of powdered metal. To aid in shift quality and long term durability, it was the first automatic transmission designed to use the Borg-Warner flexible shift band
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Transbrake
In drag racing, a transbrake is a mechanism that selectively places the transmission in first and reverse gears simultaneously, effectively holding the race car stationary as if the foot brake was applied. It is specifically used on automatic transmissions that employ a torque converter, where it is beneficial to build up hydraulic pressure before the vehicle is launched. The transbrake is activated by the driver by applying electric current to a solenoid at the transmission. With the transbrake engaged (transmission locked), the engine throttle can be increased to any position (opening) in preparation for launch without the race driver worrying about the car creeping forward
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Centrifugal Clutch
A centrifugal clutch is a clutch that uses centrifugal force to connect two concentric shafts, with the driving shaft nested inside the driven shaft. It engages more at higher speeds. The input of the clutch is connected to the engine crankshaft while the output may drive a shaft, chain, or belt. As engine revolutions per minute increase, weighted arms in the clutch swing outward and force the clutch to engage. The most common types have friction pads or shoes radially mounted that engage the inside of the rim of a housing. On the center shaft there are an assorted number of extension springs, which connect to a clutch shoe. When the central shaft spins fast enough, the springs extend causing the clutch shoes to engage the friction face. It can be compared to a drum brake in reverse. This type can be found on most home built karts, lawn and garden equipment, fuel-powered model cars and low power chainsaws
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Torque Converter
A torque converter is a type of fluid coupling which transfers rotating power from a prime mover, like an internal combustion engine, to a rotating driven load. In a vehicle with an automatic transmission, the torque converter connects the power source from the load. It is usually located between the engine's flexplate and the transmission. The equivalent location in a manual transmission would be the mechanical clutch. The key characteristic of a torque converter is its ability to multiply torque when the output rotational speed is so low that it allows the fluid coming off the curved vanes of the turbine to be deflected off the stator while it is locked against its one-way clutch, thus providing the equivalent of a reduction gear
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