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Mitsubishi Racing Lancer
The Mitsubishi Racing Lancer
Mitsubishi Racing Lancer
(code-named MRX09) is a cross-country rally car developed by Mitsubishi Motors
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Nissan AD
The Nissan
Nissan
AD is a compact van and wagon built by the automakers Nissan
Nissan
and Nissan
Nissan
Shatai since 1982
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Turbodiesel
Turbo-diesel, also written as turbodiesel and turbo diesel, refers to any diesel engine equipped with a turbocharger. Turbocharging is common in modern car and truck diesel engines to produce higher power outputs, lower emissions levels, and improved efficiency from a similar capacity of engine.[1] Turbo-diesels in automobiles offer a higher refinement level than their naturally aspirated counterparts.[2]Contents1 History 2 Characteristics 3 Turbochargers vs superchargers 4 Turbodiesels in the United States 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The turbocharger was invented in the early 20th century by Alfred Büchi, a Swiss engineer and the head of diesel engine research at Gebruder Sulzer engine manufacturing company in Winterthur. Büchi specifically intended his device to be used on diesel engines
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Car Classification
Governments and private organizations have developed car classification schemes that are used for innumerable purposes including regulation, description and categorization, among others. This article details commonly used classification schemes in use worldwide.Contents1 Classification methods 2 Size and usage-based vehicle classification systems worldwide 3 Economy car3.1 Microcar 3.2 Hatchbacks3.2.1 Ultracompact car 3.2.2 City car 3.2.3 Supermini/subcompact car3.3 Family car3.3.1 Small family car/compact car 3.3.2 Large family / mid-size4 Saloons / sedans4.1 Large family / mid-size 4.2 Full size / large 4.3 Crossover SUV 4.4 Minivans / MPVs5 Luxury vehicle5.1 Compact executive 5.2 Executive/mid-luxury 5.3 Full-size luxury / Grand saloon 5.4 Estate cars / station wagons6 Sports cars6.1 Hot hatch 6.2 Sports saloon / sports sedan 6.3 Sports car 6.4 Grand tourer 6.5 Supercar 6.6 Muscle car 6.7 Pony car 6.
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FIA
The Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile
Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile
(FIA, English: International Automobile Federation) is an association established as the Association Internationale des Automobile Clubs Reconnus (AIACR, English: 'International Association of Recognized Automobile Clubs') on 20 June 1904 to represent the interests of motoring organisations and motor car users. To the general public, the FIA is mostly known as the governing body for many auto racing events
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Cross-country Rally
Rally raid, also known as cross-country rallying is a form of long distance off-road racing that takes place over several days.[1] Each day may require traveling up to 900 kilometres (560 mi).[1] The length of the event can be 3–15 days.[1] Examples of rally raid races include the Dakar Rally, Africa Eco Race, Silk Way Rally, Budapest-Bamako, TransAnatolia Rally Raid, Hellas Rally Raid in Greece,[2] Abu Dhabi Desert Challenge, Baja Aragón, Raid De Himalaya, and Russian Baja Northern Forest.[3][1] The first African rally raid run was the Côte-Côte Rally, first held in December 1976.[4] While off-road Rally Raiding is dominated by the Dakar Rally, multiple event international competitions also exist; the FIA Cross-Country Rally World Cup for cars, buggies, SSVs, & trucks and the FIM Cross-Country Rallies World Championship and FIM Bajas World Cup for motorbikes & quads
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Curb Weight
Curb weight (American English) or kerb weight (British English) is the total weight of a vehicle with standard equipment, all necessary operating consumables such as motor oil, transmission oil, coolant, air conditioning refrigerant, and sometimes a full tank of fuel, while not loaded with either passengers or cargo. This definition may differ from definitions used by governmental regulatory agencies or other organizations
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Wheelbase
In both road and rail vehicles, the wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear wheels. For road vehicles with more than two axles (e.g. some trucks), the wheelbase is defined as the distance between the steering (front) axle and the centerpoint of the driving axle group. In the case of a tri-axle truck, the wheelbase would be the distance between the steering axle and a point midway between the two rear axles. Wheelbase
Wheelbase
(measured between rotational centers of wheels)Contents1 Vehicles1.1 Varying wheelbases within nameplate 1.2 Bikes 1.3 Skateboards2 Rail 3 See also 4 ReferencesVehicles[edit] The wheelbase of a vehicle equals the distance between its front and rear wheels. At equilibrium, the total torque of the forces acting on a vehicle is zero
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Transmission (mechanics)
A transmission is a machine in a power transmission system, which provides controlled application of the power. Often the term transmission refers simply to the gearbox that uses gears and gear trains to provide speed and torque conversions from a rotating power source to another device.[1][2] In British English, the term transmission refers to the whole drivetrain, including clutch, gearbox, prop shaft (for rear-wheel drive), differential, and final drive shafts. In American English, however, the term refers more specifically to the gearbox alone, and detailed usage differs.[note 1] The most common use is in motor vehicles, where the transmission adapts the output of the internal combustion engine to the drive wheels. Such engines need to operate at a relatively high rotational speed, which is inappropriate for starting, stopping, and slower travel. The transmission reduces the higher engine speed to the slower wheel speed, increasing torque in the process
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2009 Dakar Rally
The 2009 Dakar Rally
Dakar Rally
was the 31st running of the Dakar Rally. In addition to motorcycle, automobile, and truck categories, a separate quad (all-terrain vehicle) class was added for the first time. The race began on 3 January 2009, and took place across Argentina
Argentina
and Chile.[1] The rally was for the first time to take place outside of Europe
Europe
and Africa
Africa
as the location was changed by organizers due to concerns about possible terrorist attacks that resulted in the cancellation of the 2008 Dakar Rally.[1][2] Étienne Lavigne, the race director of the rally, first announced the new race location in February 2008 around the same time as the replacement Central Europe
Europe
Rally was held for competitors
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V6
A V6 engine
V6 engine
is a V engine
V engine
with six cylinders mounted on the crankshaft in two banks of three cylinders, usually set at either a 60 or 90 degree angle to each other. The V6 is one of the most compact engine configurations, usually ranging from 2.0 L to 4.3 L displacement (however, much larger examples have been produced for use in trucks), shorter than the inline 4 and more compact than the V8 engine
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Four-wheel Drive
Four-wheel drive, also called 4×4 ("four by four") or 4WD, refers to a two-axled vehicle drivetrain capable of providing torque to all of its wheels simultaneously. It may be full-time or on-demand, and is typically linked via a transfer case providing an additional output drive-shaft and, in many instances, additional gear ranges. A four-wheeled vehicle with torque supplied to both axles is described as "all-wheel drive" (AWD)
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Automobile Layout
In automotive design, the automobile layout describes where on the vehicle the engine and drive wheels are found. Many different combinations of engine location and driven wheels are found in practice, and the location of each is dependent on the application for which the vehicle will be used. Factors influencing the design choice include cost, complexity, reliability, packaging (location and size of the passenger compartment and boot), weight distribution, and the vehicle's intended handling characteristics. Layouts can roughly be divided into two categories: front- or rear-wheel drive
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Rally Raid
Rally raid, also known as cross-country rallying is a form of long distance off-road racing that takes place over several days.[1] Each day may require traveling up to 900 kilometres (560 mi).[1] The length of the event can be 3–15 days.[1] Examples of rally raid races include the Dakar Rally, Africa Eco Race, Silk Way Rally, Budapest-Bamako, TransAnatolia Rally Raid, Hellas Rally Raid in Greece,[2] Abu Dhabi Desert Challenge, Baja Aragón, Raid De Himalaya, and Russian Baja Northern Forest.[3][1] The first African rally raid run was the Côte-Côte Rally, first held in December 1976.[4] While off-road Rally Raiding is dominated by the Dakar Rally, multiple event international competitions also exist; the FIA Cross-Country Rally World Cup for cars, buggies, SSVs, & trucks and the FIM Cross-Country Rallies World Championship and FIM Bajas World Cup for motorbikes & quads
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Engine
An engine or motor is a machine designed to convert one form of energy into mechanical energy.[1][2] Heat
Heat
engines burn a fuel to create heat which is then used to do work. Electric motors convert electrical energy into mechanical motion; pneumatic motors use compressed air; and clockwork motors in wind-up toys use elastic energy
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Mitsubishi Cordia
The Mitsubishi Cordia
Mitsubishi Cordia
is a compact hatchback-coupé manufactured by Mitsubishi Motors
Mitsubishi Motors
between 1982 and 1990. Alongside the Tredia and Starion, the Cordia is one of the first cars imported and sold in the United States
United States
by Mitsubishi without the help of Chrysler Corporation during the period of the DaimlerChrysler–Mitsubishi alliance. The Cordia XP was the model sold at the Japanese Car Plaza retail chain, while the Cordia XG was sold at the Galant Shop chain
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