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Mitsubishi Lancer WRC
The Mitsubishi Lancer
Mitsubishi Lancer
WRC is a World Rally Car
World Rally Car
built by Ralliart, Mitsubishi Motors' motorsport division, to compete in the World Rally Championship
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MacPherson Strut
The MacPherson strut
MacPherson strut
is a type of automotive suspension system that uses the top of a telescopic damper as the upper steering pivot. It is widely used in the front suspension of modern vehicles and is named for American automotive engineer Earle S. MacPherson, who originally invented and developed the design.Contents1 History 2 Design 3 Advantages and disadvantages 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Earle S. MacPherson was appointed the chief engineer of Chevrolet's Light Car
Car
project in 1945, to develop new smaller cars for the immediate post-war market. This gave rise to the Chevrolet Cadet. By 1946 three prototypes of the Cadet design had been produced. These incorporated the first MacPherson strut
MacPherson strut
independent suspension both in front and rear.[1] The Cadet project was cancelled in 1947 and the disgruntled MacPherson was enticed to join Ford
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Carbon
Carbon
Carbon
(from Latin: carbo "coal") is a chemical element with symbol C and atomic number 6. It is nonmetallic and tetravalent—making four electrons available to form covalent chemical bonds. It belongs to group 14 of the periodic table.[13] Three isotopes occur naturally, 12C and 13C being stable, while 14C is a radionuclide, decaying with a half-life of about 5,730 years.[14] Carbon
Carbon
is one of the few elements known since antiquity.[15] Carbon
Carbon
is the 15th most abundant element in the Earth's crust, and the fourth most abundant element in the universe by mass after hydrogen, helium, and oxygen. Carbon's abundance, its unique diversity of organic compounds, and its unusual ability to form polymers at the temperatures commonly encountered on Earth
Earth
enables this element to serve as a common element of all known life
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Revolutions Per Minute
Revolutions per minute (abbreviated rpm, RPM, rev/min, r/min) is a measure of the frequency of rotation, specifically the number of rotations around a fixed axis in one minute. It is used as a measure of rotational speed of a mechanical component. In the French language, tr/min (tours par minute) is the common abbreviation. The German language uses the abbreviation U/min or u/min (Umdrehungen pro Minute).Contents1 International System of Units 2 Examples 3 See also 4 ReferencesInternational System of Units[edit] According to the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI), rpm is not a unit. This is because the word revolution is a semantic annotation rather than a unit. The annotation is instead done as a subscript of the formula sign if needed. Because of the measured physical quantity, the formula sign has to be f for (rotational) frequency and ω or Ω for angular velocity
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Newton Metre
The newton metre (also newton-metre, symbol N m or N⋅m)[1] is a unit of torque (also called "moment") in the SI system. One newton metre is equal to the torque resulting from a force of one newton applied perpendicularly to the end of a moment arm that is one metre long. It is also used less commonly as a unit of work, or energy, in which case it is equivalent to the more common and standard SI unit of energy, the joule.[2] In this usage the metre term represents the distance travelled or displacement in the direction of the force, and not the perpendicular distance from a fulcrum as it does when used to express torque
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Pound-foot (torque)
A pound-foot (lbf⋅ft or lb⋅ft) is a unit of torque (a pseudovector). One pound-foot is the torque created by one pound force acting at a perpendicular distance of one foot from a pivot point. Conversely one pound-foot is the moment about an axis that applies one pound-force at a radius of one foot. One pound-foot is approximately 1.355818 newton meters. The name "pound-foot", intended to minimize confusion with the foot-pound as a unit of work, was apparently first proposed by British physicist Arthur Mason Worthington.[1] However, the torque unit is often still referred to as the foot-pound (ft⋅lbf).[2] References[edit]^ Arthur Mason Worthington (1900). Dynamics of rotation : an elementary introduction to rigid dynamics (3rd ed.). Longmans, Green, and Co. p. 9.  ^ Erjavec, Jack. Manual Transmissions & Transaxles: Classroom manual. p. 38. ISBN 978-1-4354-3933-7. This classical mechanics-related article is a stub
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Peugeot
Peugeot
Peugeot
(UK: /'pɜːʒəʊ/; US: /puːˈʒoʊ/; French: [pøʒo]) is a French automotive manufacturer, part of Groupe PSA.[5] The family business that preceded the current Peugeot
Peugeot
company was founded in 1810,[6] and manufactured coffee mills and bicycles. On 20 November 1858, Émile Peugeot
Peugeot
applied for the lion trademark
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Tommi Mäkinen
Tommi Antero Mäkinen (Finnish pronunciation: [ˈtommi ˈmækinen]; born 26 June 1964) is a Finnish racing executive and former driver. He is the head of the Toyota Gazoo Racing team, which competes in the World Rally Championship
World Rally Championship
(WRC). Mäkinen is one of the most successful WRC drivers of all time, ranking fifth in wins (24) and third in championships (4), tied with Juha Kankkunen
Juha Kankkunen
behind Sébastien Ogier
Sébastien Ogier
(5) and Sébastien Loeb
Sébastien Loeb
(9). He is a four-time World Rally Champion, a series he first won, and then successfully defended, continuously throughout 1996, 1997, 1998 and 1999, on all occasions driving the Ralliart
Ralliart
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution. He also aided Mitsubishi to the 1998 world constructors' title as well as winning the 2000 Race of Champions
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Left-foot Braking
Left-foot braking
Left-foot braking
is the technique of using the left foot to operate the brake pedal in a three-pedal automobile, leaving the right foot dedicated to the throttle pedal.[1] It contrasts with the practice of using the left foot to operate the clutch pedal, leaving the right foot to share the duties of controlling both brake and accelerator pedals. At its most basic purpose, left-foot braking can be used to decrease the time spent moving the right foot between the brake and throttle pedals, and can also be used to control load transfer.[1] It is most commonly used in auto raci
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INVECS
INVECS
INVECS
(Intelligent & Innovative Vehicle Electronic Control System)[1] is the brand name used by Mitsubishi Motors
Mitsubishi Motors
for its electronic automatic transmission technology.Contents1 INVECS 2 INVECS-II 3 INVECS-III 4 References 5 External linksINVECS[edit] The first generation of INVECS
INVECS
debuted in the seventh generation of the Mitsubishi Galant, which was introduced in 1992.[2][3] An array of sensors continuously monitored six parameters and, using "fuzzy logic", adapted the shift patterns in the automatic gearbox "on the fly" according to the driver's style
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Clutch
A clutch is a mechanical device which engages and disengages power transmission especially from driving shaft to driven shaft. In the simplest application, clutches connect and disconnect two rotating shafts (drive shafts or line shafts). In these devices, one shaft is typically attached to an engine or other power unit (the driving member) while the other shaft (the driven member) provides output power for work. While typically the motions involved are rotary, linear clutches are also possible. In a torque-controlled drill, for instance, one shaft is driven by a motor and the other drives a drill chuck
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Metric Horsepower
Horsepower
Horsepower
(hp) is a unit of measurement of power (the rate at which work is done). There are many different standards and types of horsepower. Two common definitions being used today are the mechanical horsepower (or imperial horsepower), which is 745.7 watts, and the metric horsepower, which is approximately 735.5 watts. The term was adopted in the late 18th century by Scottish engineer James Watt
Watt
to compare the output of steam engines with the power of draft horses. It was later expanded to include the output power of other types of piston engines, as well as turbines, electric motors and other machinery.[1][2] The definition of the unit varied among geographical regions. Most countries now use the SI unit watt for measurement of power
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Active Differential
A differential is a gear train with three shafts that has the property that the rotational speed of one shaft is the average of the speeds of the others, or a fixed multiple of that average.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Epicyclic differential 4 Spur-gear differential 5 Non-automotive applications 6 Application to vehicles 7 Functional description 8 Loss of traction 9 Active differentials 10 Automobiles without differentials 11 See also 12 References 13 External linksOverview[edit]Automotive differential: The drive gear 2 is mounted on the carrier 5 which supports the planetary bevel gears 4 which engage the driven bevel gears 3 attached to the axles 1.ZF Differential. The drive shaft enters from the front and the driven axles run left and right. Car
Car
differential of a Škoda 422In automobiles and other wheeled vehicles, the differential allows the outer drive wheel to rotate faster than the inner drive wheel during a turn
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Suspension (vehicle)
Suspension is the system of tires, tire air, springs, shock absorbers and linkages that connects a vehicle to its wheels and allows relative motion between the two.[1] Suspension systems must support both roadholding/handling and ride quality,[2] which are at odds with each other. The tuning of suspensions involves finding the right compromise. It is important for the suspension to keep the road wheel in contact with the road surface as much as possible, because all the road or ground forces acting on the vehicle do so through the contact patches of the tires. The suspension also protects the vehicle itself and any cargo or luggage from damage and wear
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Independent Suspension
Independent suspension
Independent suspension
is a broad term for any automobile suspension system that allows each wheel on the same axle to move vertically (i.e. reacting to a bump in the road) independently of the others. This is contrasted with a beam axle or deDion axle system in which the wheels are linked – movement on one side affects the wheel on the other side. "Independent" refers to the motion or path of movement of the wheels or suspension. It is common for the left and right sides of the suspension to be connected with anti-roll bars or other such mechanisms. The anti-roll bar ties the left and right suspension spring rates together but does not tie their motion together. Most modern vehicles have independent front suspension (IFS). Many vehicles also have an independent rear suspension (IRS). IRS, as the name implies, has the rear wheels independently sprung
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Coil Spring
A coil spring, also known as a helical spring, is a mechanical device which is typically used to store energy and subsequently release it, to absorb shock, or to maintain a force between contacting surfaces. They are made of an elastic material formed into the shape of a helix which returns to its natural length when unloaded. Under tension or compression, the material (wire) of a coil spring undergoes torsion. The spring characteristics therefore depend on the shear modulus, not Young's Modulus. A coil spring may also be used as a torsion spring: in this case the spring as a whole is subjected to torsion about its helical axis. The material of the spring is thereby subjected to a bending moment, either reducing or increasing the helical radius
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