HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Mitsubishi Kinsei
The Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Kinsei (金星, Venus) was a 14-cylinder, air-cooled, twin-row radial aircraft engine developed by Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Heavy Industries in Japan
Japan
in 1934 for the Imperial Japanese Navy. The Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
model designation for this engine was A8 while it was an experimental project, in service it was known as the MK8 "Kinsei" by the Navy. In the middle of the war the engine was adopted by Army so it got designation Ha112[1] Unified designation code was Ha-33.Contents1 Design 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (Kinsei-44)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 BibliographyDesign[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
[...More...]

"Mitsubishi Kinsei" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Piston
A piston is a component of reciprocating engines, reciprocating pumps, gas compressors and pneumatic cylinders, among other similar mechanisms. It is the moving component that is contained by a cylinder and is made gas-tight by piston rings. In an engine, its purpose is to transfer force from expanding gas in the cylinder to the crankshaft via a piston rod and/or connecting rod
[...More...]

"Piston" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kawanishi N1K
The Kawanishi N1K
Kawanishi N1K
Kyōfū (強風 "strong wind", Allied reporting name "Rex") was an Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
floatplane fighter. The Kawanishi N1K-J Shiden (紫電 "Violet Lightning") was an Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service land-based version of the N1K. Assigned the reporting name "George", the N1K-J was considered by both its pilots and opponents to be one of the finest land-based fighters flown by the Japanese during World War II.[5][6] The Shiden Kai possessed heavy armament as well as surprisingly good manoeuvrability, due to a mercury switch that automatically extended the flaps during turns. These "combat" flaps created more lift, thereby allowing tighter turns
[...More...]

"Kawanishi N1K" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Power-to-weight Ratio
Power-to-weight ratio (or specific power or power-to-mass ratio) is a calculation commonly applied to engines and mobile power sources to enable the comparison of one unit or design to another. Power-to-weight ratio is a measurement of actual performance of any engine or power source. It is also used as a measurement of performance of a vehicle as a whole, with the engine's power output being divided by the weight (or mass) of the vehicle, to give a metric that is independent of the vehicle's size. Power-to-weight is often quoted by manufacturers at the peak value, but the actual value may vary in use and variations will affect performance. The inverse of power-to-weight, weight-to-power ratio (power loading) is a calculation commonly applied to aircraft, cars, and vehicles in general, to enable the comparison of one vehicle's performance to another
[...More...]

"Power-to-weight Ratio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Compression Ratio
The static compression ratio of an internal combustion engine or external combustion engine is a value that represents the ratio of the volume of its combustion chamber from its largest capacity to its smallest capacity. It is a fundamental specification for many common combustion engines. In a piston engine, it is the ratio between the volume of the cylinder and combustion chamber when the piston is at the bottom of its stroke, and the volume of the combustion chamber when the piston is at the top of its stroke.[1] For example, a cylinder and its combustion chamber with the piston at the bottom of its stroke may contain 1000 cc of air (900 cc in the cylinder plus 100 cc in the combustion chamber)
[...More...]

"Compression Ratio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Power Density
Power density (or volume power density or volume specific power) is the amount of power (time rate of energy transfer) per unit volume. In energy transformers including batteries, fuel cells, motors, etc., and also power supply units or similar, power density refers to a volume. It is then also called volume power density, which is expressed as W/m3. Volume
Volume
power density is sometimes an important consideration where space is constrained. In reciprocating internal combustion engines, power density—power per swept volume or brake horsepower per cubic centimeter —is an important metric. This is based on the internal capacity of the engine, not its external size. Power densities of common materials[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
[...More...]

"Power Density" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Propeller Speed Reduction Unit
A propeller speed reduction unit is a gearbox or a belt and pulley device used to reduce the output revolutions per minute (rpm) from the higher input rpm of the powerplant.[1] This allows the use of small displacement internal combustion automotive engines to turn aircraft propellers within an efficient speed range.Contents1 History and operation1.1 Types 1.2 Design variations2 Applications 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 BibliographyHistory and operation[edit] The Wright brothers
Wright brothers
recognised the need for propeller
[...More...]

"Propeller Speed Reduction Unit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Supercharger
A supercharger is an air compressor that increases the pressure or density of air supplied to an internal combustion engine
[...More...]

"Supercharger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Valvetrain
A valve train or valvetrain is a mechanical system that controls operation of the valves in an internal combustion engine,[1] in which a sequence of components transmits motion throughout the assembly
[...More...]

"Valvetrain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Yokosuka P1Y
The Yokosuka P1Y
Yokosuka P1Y
Ginga (銀河, "Galaxy") was a twin-engine, land-based bomber developed for the Japanese Imperial Navy
Japanese Imperial Navy
in World War II. It was the successor to the Mitsubishi G4M
Mitsubishi G4M
and given the Allied reporting name "Frances".Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Survivors 4 Variants 5 Number built by Nakajima and Kawanishi 6 Operators 7 Specifications (P1Y1a) 8 See also 9 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] The P1Y was designed by the Yokosuka Naval Air Technical Arsenal
Yokosuka Naval Air Technical Arsenal
to Navy specification 15-Shi,[2] calling for a fast bomber with speed matching the Zero, range matching the G4M, a 907 kg (2,000 lb) bombload, and the ability to dive-bomb as well as carry torpedoes
[...More...]

"Yokosuka P1Y" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Nakajima C6N
The Nakajima C6N Saiun (彩雲, "Iridescent Cloud") was a carrier-based reconnaissance aircraft used by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service in World War II. Advanced for its time, it was the fastest carrier-based aircraft put into service by Japan during the war. The Allied reporting name was Myrt.Contents1 Development and design 2 Operational history 3 Variants[7] 4 Operators 5 Specifications (C6N1) 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDevelopment and design[edit] The C6N originated from a 1942 Imperial Japanese Navy specification for a carrier-based reconnaissance plane with a top speed of 350 knots (650 km/h) at 6,000 m and range of 2,500 Nautical miles (4,960 km).[1] Nakajima's initial proposal, designated N-50, was for a craft with two 1,000 hp engines housed in tandem in the fuselage, driving two propellers mounted on the wings
[...More...]

"Nakajima C6N" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aircraft Engine
An aircraft engine is the component of the propulsion system for an aircraft that generates mechanical power
[...More...]

"Aircraft Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kyushu J7W
The Kyūshū J7W1 Shinden (震電, "Magnificent Lightning") fighter was a World War II
World War II
Japanese propeller-driven aircraft prototype with wings at the rear of the fuselage, a nose mounted canard, and pusher engine. Developed by the Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
(IJN) as a short-range, land-based interceptor, the J7W was a response to Boeing B-29 Superfortress raids on the Japanese home islands. For interception missions, the J7W was to be armed with four forward-firing 30 mm cannons in the nose. The Shinden was expected to be a highly maneuverable interceptor, but only two prototypes were finished before the end of war
[...More...]

"Kyushu J7W" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kawasaki Ki-102
The Kawasaki Ki-102
Kawasaki Ki-102
(Army Type 4 assault aircraft) was a Japanese warplane of World War II. It was a twin-engine, two-seat, long-range heavy fighter developed to replace the Ki-45 Toryu. Three versions were planned: the Ki-102a day fighter, Ki-102b ground-attack and Ki-102c night fighter. This aircraft's Allied reporting name was "Randy".Contents1 Design and history 2 Versions 3 Specifications (Ki-102b) 4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 BibliographyDesign and history[edit] It entered service in 1944, but saw limited action. The main type (102b) was kept in reserve to protect Japan, although it did see some limited duty in the Okinawa campaign
[...More...]

"Kawasaki Ki-102" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.