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Millimeters
The millimetre (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; SI unit symbol mm) or millimeter (American spelling) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one thousandth of a metre, which is the SI base unit
SI base unit
of length. Therefore, there are one thousand millimetres in a metre. There are ten millimetres in a centimetre. One millimetre is equal to 7003100000000000000♠1000 micrometres or 7006100000000000000♠1000000 nanometres
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Metre
The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling[1]) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is m.[2] The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second.[1] The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86. In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about ​3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard, i.e
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Yoctometre
The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths.Objects of sizes in different order of magnitude.Contents1 Overview 2 Detailed list2.1 Subatomic 2.2 Atomic to cellular 2.3 Cellular to human scale 2.4 Human
Human
to astronomical scale 2.5 Astronomical3 1 yoctometre 4 10 yoctometres 5 100 yoctometres 6 1 zeptometre 7 10 zeptometres 8 100 zeptometres 9 1 attometre 10 10 attometres 11 100 attometres 12 1 femtometre 13 10 femtometres 14 100 femtometres 15 1 picometre 16 10 picometres 17 100 picometres 18 1 nanometre 19 10 nanometres 20 100 nanometres
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Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
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Vernier Scale
A vernier scale is a visual aid that allows the user to measure more precisely than could be done unaided when reading a uniformly divided straight or circular measurement scale. It is a scale that indicates where the measurement lies in between two of the graduations on the main scale
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Microwave
Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from one meter to one millimeter; with frequencies between 300 MHz (100 cm) and 300 GHz (0.1 cm).[1][2][3][4][5] Different sources define different frequency ranges as microwaves; the above broad definition includes both UHF and EHF (millimeter wave) bands. A more common definition in radio engineering is the range between 1 and 100 GHz (wavelengths between 300 and 3 mm).[2] In all cases, microwaves include the entire SHF band (3 to 30 GHz, or 10 to 1 cm) at minimum. Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S, C, X, Ku, K, or Ka band, or by similar NATO or EU designations. The prefix micro- in microwave is not meant to suggest a wavelength in the micrometer range. It indicates that microwaves are "small", compared to the radio waves used prior to microwave technology, in that they have shorter wavelengths
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Human Hair
Hair
Hair
is a protein filament that grows from follicles found in the dermis. Hair
Hair
is one of the defining characteristics of mammals. The human body, apart from areas of glabrous skin, is covered in follicles which produce thick terminal and fine vellus hair
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Paper
Paper
Paper
is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood, rags or grasses, and drying them into flexible sheets
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Orders Of Magnitude (length)
The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths.Objects of sizes in different order of magnitude.Contents1 Overview 2 Detailed list2.1 Subatomic 2.2 Atomic to cellular 2.3 Cellular to human scale 2.4 Human
Human
to astronomical scale 2.5 Astronomical3 1 yoctometre 4 10 yoctometres 5 100 yoctometres 6 1 zeptometre 7 10 zeptometres 8 100 zeptometres 9 1 attometre 10 10 attometres 11 100 attometres 12 1 femtometre 13 10 femtometres 14 100 femtometres 15 1 picometre 16 10 picometres 17 100 picometres 18 1 nanometre 19 10 nanometres 20 100 nanometres
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Submillimeter
Submillimetre astronomy or submillimeter astronomy (see spelling differences) is the branch of observational astronomy that is conducted at submillimetre wavelengths (i.e., terahertz radiation) of the electromagnetic spectrum. Astronomers place the submillimetre waveband between the far-infrared and microwave wavebands, typically taken to be between a few hundred micrometres and a millimetre. It is still common in submillimetre astronomy to quote wavelengths in 'microns', the old name for micrometre. Using submillimetre observations, astronomers examine molecular clouds and dark cloud cores with a goal of clarifying the process of star formation from earliest collapse to stellar birth. Submillimetre observations of these dark clouds can be used to determine chemical abundances and cooling mechanisms for the molecules which comprise them
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Zeptometre
The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths.Objects of sizes in different order of magnitude.Contents1 Overview 2 Detailed list2.1 Subatomic 2.2 Atomic to cellular 2.3 Cellular to human scale 2.4 Human
Human
to astronomical scale 2.5 Astronomical3 1 yoctometre 4 10 yoctometres 5 100 yoctometres 6 1 zeptometre 7 10 zeptometres 8 100 zeptometres 9 1 attometre 10 10 attometres 11 100 attometres 12 1 femtometre 13 10 femtometres 14 100 femtometres 15 1 picometre 16 10 picometres 17 100 picometres 18 1 nanometre 19 10 nanometres 20 100 nanometres
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Korean Language
The Language Research Institute, Academy of Social Science 사회과학원 어학연구소 / 社會科學院 語學研究所 (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) National Institute of the Korean Language 국립국어원 / 國立國語院 (Republic of Korea) China
China
Korean Language Regulatory Commission 중국조선어규범위원회 中国朝鲜语规范委员会 (People's Republic of China)Language codesISO 639-1 koISO 639-2 korISO 639-3 Variously: kor – Modern Korean jje – Jeju okm – Middle Korean oko – Old Korean oko – Proto KoreanLinguist Listokm Middle Korean  oko Old KoreanGlottolog kore1280[2]Linguasphere 45-AAA-aCountries with native Korean-speaking populations (established immigrant communities in green).This article contains IPA phonetic symbols
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Attometre
The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths.Objects of sizes in different order of magnitude.Contents1 Overview 2 Detailed list2.1 Subatomic 2.2 Atomic to cellular 2.3 Cellular to human scale 2.4 Human
Human
to astronomical scale 2.5 Astronomical3 1 yoctometre 4 10 yoctometres 5 100 yoctometres 6 1 zeptometre 7 10 zeptometres 8 100 zeptometres 9 1 attometre 10 10 attometres 11 100 attometres 12 1 femtometre 13 10 femtometres 14 100 femtometres 15 1 picometre 16 10 picometres 17 100 picometres 18 1 nanometre 19 10 nanometres 20 100 nanometres
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