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Millimeters
The MILLIMETRE (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures ; SI unit symbol MM) or MILLIMETER (American spelling ) is a unit of length in the metric system , equal to one thousandth of a metre , which is the SI base unit
SI base unit
of length. Therefore there are one thousand millimetres in a metre. There are ten millimetres in a centimetre. One millimetre is equal to 7003100000000000000♠1000 micrometres or 7006100000000000000♠1000000 nanometres . A millimetre is equal to exactly  5⁄127 (approximately 0.039370) of an inch . CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 Unicode
Unicode
symbols * 3 Measurement * 4 See also * 5 References DEFINITIONSince 1983, the metre has been defined as "the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/7008299792458000000♠299792458 of a second "
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Submillimeter
SUBMILLIMETRE ASTRONOMY or SUBMILLIMETER ASTRONOMY (see spelling differences ) is the branch of observational astronomy that is conducted at submillimetre wavelengths (i.e., terahertz radiation ) of the electromagnetic spectrum . Astronomers place the submillimetre waveband between the far-infrared and microwave wavebands, typically taken to be between a few hundred micrometres and a millimetre . It is still common in submillimetre astronomy to quote wavelengths in 'microns', the old name for micrometre. Using submillimetre observations, astronomers examine molecular clouds and dark cloud cores with a goal of clarifying the process of star formation from earliest collapse to stellar birth . Submillimetre observations of these dark clouds can be used to determine chemical abundances and cooling mechanisms for the molecules which comprise them . In addition, submillimetre observations give information on the mechanisms for the formation and evolution of galaxies
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Orders Of Magnitude (length)
The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths . Objects of sizes in different order of magnitude
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Yoctometre
The YOCTOMETRE (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures ; SI symbol: YM) or YOCTOMETER (American spelling ) is an SI measure of length that is equal to 10−24 (yocto ) of a metre . It is the smallest named subdivision of the metre in the SI base unit of length. USES For more details on this topic, see Distances shorter than 1 pm
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Paper
PAPER is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood , rags or grasses , and drying them into flexible sheets. It is a versatile material with many uses, including writing , printing , packaging, cleaning , and a number of industrial and construction processes. The pulp papermaking process is said to have been developed in China during the early 2nd century CE, possibly as early as the year 105 CE, by the Han court eunuch Cai Lun , although the earliest archaeological fragments of paper derive from the 2nd century BCE in China. The modern pulp and paper industry is global, with China leading its production and the United States right behind it
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Human Hair
HAIR is a protein filament that grows from follicles found in the dermis , the innermost layer of the skin. Hair
Hair
is one of the defining characteristics of mammals . The human body, apart from areas of glabrous skin , is covered in follicles which produce thick terminal and fine vellus hair . Most common interest in hair is focused on hair growth , hair types and hair care , but hair is also an important biomaterial primarily composed of protein, notably alpha-keratin . Attitudes towards different hair, such as hairstyles and hair removal , vary widely across different cultures and historical periods, but it is often used to indicate a person's personal beliefs or social position, such as their age, sex, or religion
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Unicode
UNICODE is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding , representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems . Developed in conjunction with the Universal Coded Character Set (UCS) standard and published as The Unicode Standard, the latest version of Unicode
Unicode
contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts , as well as multiple symbol sets. The standard consists of a set of code charts for visual reference, an encoding method and set of standard character encodings , a set of reference data files , and a number of related items, such as character properties, rules for normalization , decomposition, collation , rendering, and bidirectional display order (for the correct display of text containing both right-to-left scripts, such as Arabic and Hebrew , and left-to-right scripts). As of June 2017 , the most recent version is Unicode
Unicode
10.0
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Vernier Scale
A VERNIER SCALE is a visual aid that allows the user to measure more precisely than could be done unaided when reading a uniformly divided straight or circular measurement scale. It is a SCALE that indicates where the measurement lies in between two of the graduations on the main scale. Verniers are common on sextants used in navigation , scientific instruments used to conduct experiments, machinists ' (or jewelers ') measuring tools (all sorts, but especially calipers and micrometers ) used to work materials to fine tolerances , on theodolites used in surveying , and in absolute encoders to measure linear or rotational displacements. A close-up of a caliper's measurement scales. Assuming the caliper has no "zero error" (that is, it registers 0.00 mm when fully closed) the image shows a reading of 3.58 mm ± 0.02 mm
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Microwave
MICROWAVES are a form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from one meter to one millimeter; with frequencies between 300 MHz (100 cm) and 300 GHz (0.1 cm). Different sources define different frequency ranges as microwaves; the above broad definition includes both UHF and EHF (millimeter wave ) bands. A more common definition in radio engineering is the range between 1 and 100 GHz (300 and 3 mm). In all cases, microwaves include the entire SHF band (3 to 30 GHz, or 10 to 1 cm) at minimum. Frequencies in the microwave range are often referred to by their IEEE radar band designations: S , C , X , Ku , K , or Ka band , or by similar NATO or EU designations. The prefix micro- in microwave is not meant to suggest a wavelength in the micrometer range. It indicates that microwaves are "small", compared to the radio waves used prior to microwave technology, in that they have shorter wavelengths
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Gigabit
The GIGABIT is a multiple of the unit bit for digital information or computer storage . The prefix giga (symbol G) is defined in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) as a multiplier of 109 (1 billion, short scale ), and therefore 1 gigabit = 109bits = 1000000000bits. The gigabit has the unit symbol GBIT or GB. Using the common byte size of 8 bits, 1 Gbit is equal to 125 megabytes (MB) or approximately 119 mebibytes (MiB). The gigabit is closely related to the gibibit , a unit multiple derived from the binary prefix gibi (symbol Gi) of the same order of magnitude, which is equal to 230bits = 1073741824bits, or approximately 7% larger than the gigabit
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Zeptometre
The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths . Objects of sizes in different order of magnitude
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Attometre
The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths . Objects of sizes in different order of magnitude
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Terametre
The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths . Objects of sizes in different order of magnitude
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