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Millimeters
The MILLIMETRE (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures ; SI unit symbol MM) or MILLIMETER (American spelling ) is a unit of length in the metric system , equal to one thousandth of a metre , which is the SI base unit
SI base unit
of length. Therefore there are one thousand millimetres in a metre. There are ten millimetres in a centimetre. One millimetre is equal to 7003100000000000000♠1000 micrometres or 7006100000000000000♠1000000 nanometres . A millimetre is equal to exactly  5⁄127 (approximately 0.039370) of an inch . CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 Unicode symbols * 3 Measurement * 4 See also * 5 References DEFINITIONSince 1983, the metre has been defined as "the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/7008299792458000000♠299792458 of a second ". A millimetre, 1/1000 of a metre, is therefore the distance travelled by light in 1/7011299792458000000♠299792458000 of a second. UNICODE SYMBOLSFor the purposes of compatibility with Chinese , Japanese and Korean ( CJK ) characters, Unicode has symbols for: * millimetre (㎜) - code U+339C * square millimetre (㎟) - code U+339F * cubic millimetre (㎣) - code U+33A3 MEASUREMENTOn a metric ruler, the smallest measurements are normally millimetres. High-quality engineering rules may be graduated in increments of 0.5 mm
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System Of Measurement
A SYSTEM OF MEASUREMENT is a collection of units of measurement and rules relating them to each other. Systems of measurement have historically been important, regulated and defined for the purposes of science and commerce . Systems of measurement in modern use include the metric system , the imperial system , and United States
United States
customary units . CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Current practice * 2 Metric system * 3 Imperial and US customary units * 4 Natural units * 5 Non-standard units * 5.1 Area * 5.2 Energy
Energy
* 6 Units of currency * 7 Historical systems of measurement * 7.1 Africa * 7.2 Asia * 7.3 Europe * 7.4 North America * 7.5 Oceania * 7.6 South America * 8 See also * 8.1 Conversion tables * 9 Notes and references * 10 Bibliography * 11 External links HISTORY Main article: History of measurement The French Revolution gave rise to the metric system , and this has spread around the world, replacing most customary units of measure. In most systems, length (distance), mass , and time are _base quantities_. Later science developments showed that either electric charge or electric current could be added to extend the set of base quantities by which many other metrological units could be easily defined. (However, electrical units are not necessary for such a set
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SI Derived Unit
The International System of Units (SI) specifies a set of seven base units from which all other SI units of measurement are derived. These SI DERIVED UNITS are either dimensionless , or can be expressed as a product of one or more of the base units, possibly scaled by an appropriate power of exponentiation . Many derived units do not have special names. For example, the SI derived unit of area is the square metre (m2) and the SI derived unit of density is the kilogram per cubic metre (kg/m3 or kg m−3). However, 22 derived units are recognized by the SI with special names, which are written in lowercase. However, the symbols for units named after persons, are always written with an uppercase initial letter. For example, the symbol for the hertz is "Hz"; but the symbol for the metre is "m". CONTENTS * 1 Derived units with special names * 2 Examples of derived quantities and units * 3 Other units used with SI * 4 Supplementary units * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Bibliography DERIVED UNITS WITH SPECIAL NAMESThe International System of Units assigns special names to 22 derived units, which includes two dimensionless derived units, the radian (rad) and the steradian (sr)
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Length
In geometric measurements, LENGTH is the most extended dimension of an object. In the International System of Quantities , length is any quantity with dimension distance. In other contexts "length" is the measured dimension of an object. For example, it is possible to cut a length of a wire which is shorter than wire thickness. Length
Length
may be distinguished from height , which is vertical extent, and width or breadth, which are the distance from side to side, measuring across the object at right angles to the length. Length
Length
is a measure of one dimension, whereas area is a measure of two dimensions (length squared) and volume is a measure of three dimensions (length cubed). In most systems of measurement , the unit of length is a base unit , from which other units are derived. The metric length of one kilometre is equivalent to the imperial measurement of 0.62137 miles . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Units * 3 See also * 4 References HISTORY Measurement
Measurement
has been important ever since humans settled from nomadic lifestyles and started using building materials, occupying land and trading with neighbours. As society has become more technologically oriented, much higher accuracies of measurement are required in an increasingly diverse set of fields, from micro-electronics to interplanetary ranging
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Metric Prefix
A METRIC PREFIX is a unit prefix that precedes a basic unit of measure to indicate a multiple or fraction of the unit. While all metric prefixes in common use today are decadic , historically there have been a number of binary metric prefixes as well. Each prefix has a unique symbol that is prepended to the unit symbol. The prefix _kilo- _, for example, may be added to _gram_ to indicate _multiplication_ by one thousand: one kilogram is equal to one thousand grams. The prefix _milli- _, likewise, may be added to _metre_ to indicate _division_ by one thousand; one millimetre is equal to one thousandth of a metre. Decimal multiplicative prefixes have been a feature of all forms of the metric system , with six dating back to the system's introduction in the 1790s. Metric prefixes have even been prepended to non-metric units. The SI PREFIXES are standardized for use in the International System of Units (SI) by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) in resolutions dating from 1960 to 1991. Since 2009, they have formed part of the International System of Quantities
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Latin
LATIN (Latin: _lingua latīna_, IPA: ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages . The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets , and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet . Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium , in the Italian Peninsula . Through the power of the Roman Republic , it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire . Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages , such as Italian , Portuguese , Spanish , French , and Romanian . Latin
Latin
and French have contributed many words to the English language . Latin
Latin
and Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
roots are used in theology , biology , and medicine . By the late Roman Republic (75 BC), Old Latin had been standardised into Classical Latin . Vulgar Latin was the colloquial form spoken during the same time and attested in inscriptions and the works of comic playwrights like Plautus and Terence
Terence

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Metre
The METRE (international spelling ) or METER (American spelling ) (from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in the International System of Units (SI). The SI unit symbol is M. The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 seconds . The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole
North Pole
. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86 . In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about  3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard , i.e. about  39 3⁄8 inches
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Centimetre
A CENTIMETRE (international spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures ; symbol CM) or CENTIMETER (American spelling ) is a unit of length in the metric system , equal to one hundredth of a metre , centi being the SI prefix
SI prefix
for a factor of 1/100. The centimetre was the base unit of length in the now deprecated centimetre–gram–second (CGS) system of units. Though for many physical quantities, SI prefixes for factors of 103—like milli- and kilo-—are often preferred by technicians, the centimetre remains a practical unit of length for many everyday measurements. A centimetre is approximately the width of the fingernail of an average adult person. CONTENTS * 1 Equivalence to other units of length * 2 Other uses * 3 Unicode
Unicode
symbols * 4 See also * 5 References EQUIVALENCE TO OTHER UNITS OF LENGTH 1 centimetre = 10 millimetres = 0.01 metres = 0.393700787401574803149606299212598425196850 inches (There are exactly 2.54 centimetres in one inch.)One 1 millilitre is defined as one cubic centimetre, under the SI system of units
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Meter
The METRE (international spelling ) or METER (American spelling ) (from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is M. The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 seconds . The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole
North Pole
. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86 . In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about  3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard , i.e. about  39 3⁄8 inches
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Kilometre
The KILOMETRE (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures ; SI symbol: KM; /ˈkɪləmiːtər/ or /kɪˈlɒmɪtər/ ) or KILOMETER (American spelling ) is a unit of length in the metric system , equal to one thousand metres (kilo- being the SI prefix for 7003100000000000000♠1000). It is now the measurement unit used officially for expressing distances between geographical places on land in most of the world; notable exceptions are the United States and the road network of the United Kingdom where the statute mile is the official unit used. _k_ (pronounced /keɪ/ ) is occasionally used in some English-speaking countries as an alternative for the word kilometre in colloquial writing and speech. A slang term for the kilometre in the US military is _klick_. CONTENTS * 1 Pronunciation * 2 Equivalence to other units of length * 3 History * 4 International usage * 4.1 United Kingdom * 4.2 United States * 5 Kilometre records * 6 See also * 7 Notes and references * 8 External links PRONUNCIATION _ This section NEEDS ADDITIONAL CITATIONS FOR VERIFICATION . Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2011)_ _(Learn how and when to remove this template message )_There are two common pronunciations for the word
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Inch
The INCH (abbreviation: IN or ″ ) is a unit of length in the (British) imperial and United States customary systems of measurement now formally equal to  1⁄36 yard but usually understood as  1⁄12 of a foot . Derived from the Roman uncia ("twelfth"), _inch_ is also sometimes used to translate related units in other measurement systems, usually understood as deriving from the width of the human thumb . Traditional standards for the exact length of an inch have varied in the past, but since the adoption of the international yard during the 1950s and 1960s it has been based on the metric system and defined as exactly 2.54 cm . CONTENTS * 1 Name * 2 Usage * 2.1 Equivalences * 3 History * 4 Related units * 4.1 US Survey inches * 4.2 Continental inches * 4.3 Scottish inch * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 7.1 Citations * 7.2 Bibliography NAMEThe English word "inch" (Old English : _ynce_) was an early borrowing from Latin _uncia_ ("one-twelfth; Roman inch ; Roman ounce ") not present in other Germanic languages . The vowel change from Latin /u/ to English /ɪ/ is known as umlaut . The consonant change from the Latin /k/ to English /tʃ/ or /ʃ/ is palatalisation . Both were features of Old English phonology
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Foot (unit)
The FOOT (pl. FEET; abbreviation: FT; symbol: ′, the prime symbol ) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement . Since 1959, both units have been defined by international agreement as equivalent to 0.3048 meters exactly. In both systems, the foot comprises 12 inches and three feet compose a yard . Historically the "foot" was a part of many local systems of units, including the Greek , Roman , Chinese , French , and English systems. It varied in length from country to country, from city to city, and sometimes from trade to trade. Its length was usually between 250 mm and 335 mm and was generally, but not always, subdivided into 12 inches or 16 digits . The United States is the only industrialized nation that uses the international foot and the survey foot (a customary unit of length ) in preference to the meter in its commercial, engineering, and standards activities. The foot is legally recognized in the United Kingdom; road signs _must_ use imperial units (however distances on road signs are always marked in yards, not feet), while its usage is widespread among the British public as a measurement of height. The foot is recognized as an alternative expression of length in Canada officially defined as a unit derived from the meter although both the U.K
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International Bureau Of Weights And Measures
Coordinates : 48°49′45.55″N 2°13′12.64″E / 48.8293194°N 2.2201778°E / 48.8293194; 2.2201778 The INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES (French : _BUREAU INTERNATIONAL DES POIDS ET MESURES_) is an international standards organisation , one of three such organisations established to maintain the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) under the terms of the Metre Convention (_Convention du Mètre_). The organisation is usually referred to by its French initialism , BIPM. The BIPM reports to the International Committee for Weights and Measures (French : _Comité international des poids et mesures, CIPM_), which is in turn overseen by periodic meetings of the General Conference on Weights and Measures (French : _Conférence générale des poids et mesures, CGPM_). These organizations are also commonly referred to by their French initialisms. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Function * 3 Directors of the BIPM * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORYThe BIPM was created on 20 May 1875, following the signing of the Metre Convention , a treaty among 51 nations (as of August 2008 )
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International System Of Units
The INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF UNITS (abbreviated as SI, from the French _Système internationale (d'unités)_) is the modern form of the metric system , and is the most widely used system of measurement . It comprises a coherent system of units of measurement built on seven base units . The system also establishes a set of twenty prefixes to the unit names and unit symbols that may be used when specifying multiples and fractions of the units. The system was published in 1960 as a result of an initiative that began in 1948. It is based on the metre–kilogram–second system of units (MKS) rather than any variant of the centimetre–gram–second system (CGS). SI is intended to be an evolving system, so prefixes and units are created and unit definitions are modified through international agreement as the technology of measurement progresses and the precision of measurements improves. The 24th and 25th General Conferences on Weights and Measures (CGPM) in 2011 and 2014, for example, discussed a proposal to change the definition of the kilogram , linking it to an invariant of nature rather than to the mass of a material artefact, thereby ensuring long-term stability. The motivation for the development of the SI was the diversity of units that had sprung up within the CGS systems and the lack of coordination between the various disciplines that used them
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