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Mikhail Gorbachev
Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev, GCL (US: /ˈɡɔːrbəˌtʃɑːv/,[1] UK: /ˈɡɔːbəˌtʃɒf/; Russian: Михаи́л Серге́евич Горбачёв, IPA: [mʲɪxɐˈil sʲɪrˈɡʲejɪvʲɪtɕ ɡərbɐˈtɕɵf] ( listen); born 2 March 1931)[2] is a Russian and former Soviet politician. He was the eighth and last leader of the Soviet Union, having been General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union
Communist Party of the Soviet Union
from 1985 until 1991
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Eastern Slavic Naming Customs
Eastern Slavic naming customs
Eastern Slavic naming customs
are the traditional ways of identifying a person by name in countries influenced by East Slavic languages (Russian, Ukrainian and Belorussian: in Russia, Belarus, Ukraine
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Presidium Of The Supreme Soviet Of The Soviet Union
The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
(Russian: Президиум Верховного Совета or Prezidium Verkhovnogo Soveta) was a Soviet governmental institution – a permanent body of the Supreme Soviets (parliaments). This body was of the all-Union level (Presidium of the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
of the Soviet Union), as well as in all Soviet republics (e.g., Presidium of the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
of the Byelorussian SSR) and autonomous republics. Structure and functions of the presidiums in these republics were virtually identical.[1] The presidiums were elected by the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
to act on its behalf while the soviet was not in session
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25th Secretariat Of The Communist Party Of The Soviet Union
Secretariat may refer to: Secretariat (administrative office)Contents1 Name 2 Intergovernmental entities 3 Governmental entities 4 See alsoName[edit] Secretariat (horse), racehorse that won the Triple Crown in 1973 Secretariat (film), 2010 film about the racehorse Secretari
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26th Politburo Of The Communist Party Of The Soviet Union
A politburo (/ˈpɒlɪtˌbjʊəroʊ/) or political bureau is the executive committee for communist parties.[1]Contents1 Names 2 History 3 Socialist states 4 Trotskyist
Trotskyist
parties 5 See also 6 ReferencesNames[edit] The term "politburo" in English comes from the Russian Politbyuro (Политбюро), itself a contraction of Politicheskoye Byuro (Политическое бюро, "Political Bureau"). The Spanish term Politburó is directly loaned from Russian, as is the German Politbüro
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Law
Law
Law
is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.[2] Law
Law
is a system that regulates and ensures that individuals or a community adhere to the will of the state. State-enforced laws can be made by a collective legislature or by a single legislator, resulting in statutes, by the executive through decrees and regulations, or established by judges through precedent, normally in common law jurisdictions. Private individuals can create legally binding contracts, including arbitration agreements that may elect to accept alternative arbitration to the normal court process. The formation of laws themselves may be influenced by a constitution, written or tacit, and the rights encoded therein
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Independent Politician
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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25th Politburo Of The Communist Party Of The Soviet Union
A politburo (/ˈpɒlɪtˌbjʊəroʊ/) or political bureau is the executive committee for communist parties.[1]Contents1 Names 2 History 3 Socialist states 4 Trotskyist
Trotskyist
parties 5 See also 6 ReferencesNames[edit] The term "politburo" in English comes from the Russian Politbyuro (Политбюро), itself a contraction of Politicheskoye Byuro (Политическое бюро, "Political Bureau"). The Spanish term Politburó is directly loaned from Russian, as is the German Politbüro
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American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
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Presidium Of The Supreme Soviet
The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
(Russian: Президиум Верховного Совета or Prezidium Verkhovnogo Soveta) was a Soviet governmental institution – a permanent body of the Supreme Soviets (parliaments). This body was of the all-Union level (Presidium of the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
of the Soviet Union), as well as in all Soviet republics (e.g., Presidium of the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
of the Byelorussian SSR) and autonomous republics. Structure and functions of the presidiums in these republics were virtually identical.[1] The presidiums were elected by the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
to act on its behalf while the soviet was not in session
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Supreme Soviet
The Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
(Russian: Верховный Совет, Verkhóvnyj Sovét, English: literally "Supreme Council") was the common name for the legislative bodies (parliaments) of the Soviet socialist republics (SSR) in the Soviet Union. These soviets were modeled after the Supreme Soviet
Supreme Soviet
of the Soviet Union, established in 1938, and were nearly identical.[1] Soviet-approved delegates to the Supreme Soviets were periodically elected in unopposed elections.[2] The first free or semi-free elections took place during perestroika in late 1980s
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Order Of Liberty
The Order of Liberty, or the Order of Freedom (Portuguese: Ordem da Liberdade), is a Portuguese honorific civil order that distinguishes relevant services to the cause of democracy and freedom, in the defense of the values of civilization and human dignity. The order was created in 1976, after the Carnation Revolution
Carnation Revolution
of 1974 in which the corporatist authoritarian Estado Novo regime of António de Oliveira Salazar and Marcello Caetano
Marcello Caetano
was deposed
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Surname
A surname, family name, or last name is the portion of a personal name that indicates a person's family (or tribe or community, depending on the culture).[1] Depending on the culture all members of a family unit may have identical surnames or there may be variations based on the cultural rules. In the English-speaking world, a surname is commonly referred to as a last name because it is usually placed at the end of a person's full name, after any given names. In many parts of Asia, as well as some parts of Europe
Europe
and Africa, the family name is placed before a person's given name. In most Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking countries, two surnames are commonly used and in some families that claim a connection to nobility even three are used. Surnames have not always existed and today are not universal in all cultures. This tradition has arisen separately in different cultures around the world
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