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Mike Paterson
Michael Stewart "Mike" Paterson, is a British computer scientist, who was the director of the Centre for Discrete Mathematics and its Applications at the University of Warwick
University of Warwick
until 2007, and chair of the Department of Computer Science
Computer Science
in 2005. He received his doctorate from Cambridge University in 1967, under the supervision of David Park.[1] He spent three years at MIT
MIT
and moved to University of Warwick
University of Warwick
in 1971.[2] Paterson is an expert on theoretical computer science with more than 100 publications, especially the design and analysis of algorithms and computational complexity. Paterson's distinguished career was recognised with the EATCS Award
EATCS Award
in 2006 and a workshop in honour of his 66th birthday in 2008, including contributions of several Turing Award and Gödel Prize laureates
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Mountaineering
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Gödel Prize
The Gödel Prize is an annual prize for outstanding papers in the area of theoretical computer science, given jointly by European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (EATCS) and the Association for Computing Machinery Special
Special
Interest Group on Algorithms and Computational Theory (ACM SIGACT). The award is named in honor of Kurt Gödel. Gödel's connection to theoretical computer science is that he was the first to mention the "P versus NP" question, in a 1956 letter to John von Neumann
John von Neumann
in which Gödel asked whether a certain NP-complete
NP-complete
problem could be solved in quadratic or linear time.[1] The Gödel Prize has been awarded since 1993
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Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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DBLP
DBLP is a computer science bibliography website. Starting in 1993 at the University of Trier, Germany, it grew from a small collection of HTML files[1] and became an organization hosting a database and logic programming bibliography site. DBLP listed more than 3.66 million journal articles, conference papers, and other publications on computer science in July 2016, up from about 14,000 in 1995.[2] All important journals on computer science are tracked. Proceedings papers of many conferences are also tracked. It is mirrored at three sites across the Internet.[3][4][5] For his work on maintaining DBLP, Michael Ley received an award from the Association for Computing Machinery
Association for Computing Machinery
and the VLDB Endowment Special Recognition Award in 1997. DBLP originally stood for DataBase systems and Logic Programming
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Theoretical Computer Science (journal)
Theoretical Computer Science
Computer Science
(TCS) is a computer science journal published by Elsevier, started in 1975 and covering theoretical computer science. The journal publishes 52 issues a year. It is abstracted and indexed by Scopus and the Science Citation Index. According to the Journal Citation Reports, its 2016 impact factor is 0.698.This article about a computer science journal is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals. Further suggestions might be found on the article's talk page.P ≟ NP  This theoretical computer science–related article is a stub
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Symposium On Parallel Algorithms And Architectures
SPAA, the ACM Symposium on Parallelism in Algorithms and Architectures, is an academic conference in the fields of parallel computing and distributed computing. It is sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery
Association for Computing Machinery
special interest groups SIGACT and SIGARCH, and it is organized in cooperation with the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (EATCS).[1]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksHistory[edit] SPAA was first organised on 18–21 June 1989, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, United States.[2] In 1989–2002, SPAA was known as Symposium on Parallel Algorithms and Architectures
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SICOMP
The SIAM Journal on Computing (SICOMP) is a scientific journal focusing on the mathematical and formal aspects of computer science. It is published by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). References[edit]"Top journals in computer science". Times Higher Education. 14 May 2009. Retrieved 22 August 2009. External links[edit]SIAM Journal on Computing bibliographic information on DBLPv t eSociety for Industrial and Applied MathematicsAwardsJohn von Neumann Lecture SIAM Fellowship Germund Dahlquist Prize George David Birkhoff Prize Norbert Wiener Prize in Applied Mathematics Ralph E. Kleinman Prize J.D. Crawford Prize J. H. Wilkinson Prize for Numerical Software SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession W.T
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Uri Zwick
Uri Zwick is an Israeli computer scientist and mathematician known for his work on graph algorithms, in particular on distances in graphs and on the color-coding technique for subgraph isomorphism.[1] With Howard Karloff, he is the namesake of the Karloff–Zwick algorithm for approximating the MAX-3SAT problem of Boolean satisfiability.[2] He and his coauthors won the David P
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Mathematics Genealogy Project
The Mathematics
Mathematics
Genealogy Project is a web-based database for the academic genealogy of mathematicians.[1][2][3] By 3 January 2018, it contained information on 222,193 mathematical scientists who contributed to research-level mathematics
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Sprouts (game)
Sprouts is a paper-and-pencil game with significant mathematical properties. It was invented by mathematicians John Horton Conway
John Horton Conway
and Michael S. Paterson at Cambridge University in the early 1960s.Contents1 Rules 2 Number of moves2.1 Maximum number of moves 2.2 Minimum number of moves 2.3 Importance in real games3 Winning strategies3.1 Normal version 3.2 Misère version4 Brussels Sprouts 5 References 6 External linksRules[edit] The game is played by two players, starting with a few spots drawn on a sheet of paper. Players take turns, where each turn consists of drawing a line between two spots (or from a spot to itself) and adding a new spot somewhere along the line. The players are constrained by the following rules.The line may be straight or curved, but must not touch or cross itself or any other line. The new spot cannot be placed on top of one of the endpoints of the new line
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Fellow Of The Royal Society
Fellowship of the Royal Society
Royal Society
(FRS, ForMemRS and HonFRS) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society
Royal Society
judges to
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Lester R. Ford Award
The Paul R. Halmos
Paul R. Halmos
Lester R. Ford
Lester R. Ford
Award
Award
(formerly known as the Lester R. Ford
Lester R. Ford
Award) is a $1,000 prize given annually by the Mathematical Association of America
Mathematical Association of America
for authors of articles of expository excellence published in The American Mathematical Monthly or Mathematics Magazine.[1] It is awarded to at most four authors each year.[1] The prize was established in 1964 as the Lester R. Ford
Lester R. Ford
Award to honor the contributions of mathematician and former MAA president Lester R. Ford.[1] In 2012 the award was renamed the Paul R. Halmos – Lester R. Ford
Lester R. Ford
Award
Award
to honor the contributions of former The American Mathematical Monthly editor Paul R. Halmos
Paul R

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ICALP
ICALP, the International Colloquium on Automata, Languages and Programming is an academic conference organized annually by the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science
European Association for Theoretical Computer Science
and held in different locations around Europe. Like most theoretical computer science conferences its contributions are strongly peer-reviewed. The articles have appeared in proceedings published by Springer in their Lecture Notes in Computer Science, but beginning in 2016 they will instead be published by the Leibniz International Proceedings in Informatics.[1] The ICALP conference series was established by Maurice Nivat,[2] who organized the first ICALP in Paris, France
France
in 1972
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Nancy Lynch
Nancy Ann Lynch (born January 19, 1948)[1] is a mathematician, a theorist, and a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is the NEC Professor of Software Science and Engineering in the EECS department and heads the "Theory of Distributed Systems" research group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She is the author of numerous research articles about distributed algorithms and impossibility results, and about formal modeling and validation of distributed systems (see, e.g., input/output automaton). She is the author of the graduate textbook "Distributed Algorithms".[2] She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and an ACM Fellow.[3] Lynch was born in Brooklyn, and her academic training was in mathematics, at Brooklyn
Brooklyn
College and MIT, where she received her Ph.D. in 1972 under the supervision of Albert R
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