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Mickey Mouse
Mickey Mouse
Mouse
is a funny animal cartoon character and the mascot of The Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Company. He was created by Walt Disney
Walt Disney
and Ub Iwerks
Ub Iwerks
at the Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Studios in 1928. An anthropomorphic mouse who typically wears red shorts, large yellow shoes, and white gloves, Mickey is one of the world's most recognizable characters. Mickey first appeared in the short Plane Crazy, debuting publicly in the short film Steamboat Willie
Steamboat Willie
(1928), one of the first sound cartoons. He went on to appear in over 130 films, including The Band Concert (1935), Brave Little Tailor
Brave Little Tailor
(1938), and Fantasia
Fantasia
(1940). Mickey appeared primarily in short films, but also occasionally in feature-length films
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Fictional Character
A character (sometimes known as a fictional character) is a person or other being in a narrative (such as a novel, play, television series, film, or video game).[1][2][3] The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made.[2] Derived from the ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration,[4] although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones in 1749.[5][6] From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor" developed.[6] Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema, involves "the illusion of being a human person."[7] In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes.[8] Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor.[6] Since the 19th century, the art of creating cha
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Everyman
In literature and drama, the term everyman has come to mean an ordinary individual[1][2] with whom the audience or reader is supposed to be able to identify easily and who is often placed in extraordinary circumstances.Contents1 Description 2 Uses 3 Examples3.1 In fiction 3.2 In non-fiction4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] The name derives from a 15th-century English morality play called Everyman.[2] The contemporary everyman differs from his (or her) medieval counterpart in many respects. While the medieval everyman was devoid of definite marks of individuality in order to create a universality in the moral message of the play, the contemporary storyteller may use an everyman for amoral, immoral, or demonstrative purposes.[citation needed] Uses[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Antihero
An antihero, or antiheroine, is a protagonist in a story who lacks conventional heroic qualities and attributes such as idealism, courage, and morality.[1][2][3][4][5] Although antiheroes may sometimes do the right thing, it is not always for the right reasons, often acting primarily out of self-interest or in ways that defy conventional ethical codes.[6]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit]U.S
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Voice Acting
Voice acting
Voice acting
is the art of performing voice-overs or providing voices to represent a character or to provide information to an audience or user. Examples include animated, off-stage, off-screen or non-visible characters in various works, including feature films, dubbed foreign language films, animated short films, television programs, commercials, radio or audio dramas, comedy, video games, puppet shows, amusement rides, audiobooks and documentaries. Voice acting
Voice acting
is also done for small handheld audio games. Performers are called voice actors or actresses, voice artists or voice talent. Their roles may also involve singing, although a second voice actor is sometimes cast as the character's singing voice
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Significant Other
Significant other (SO) colloquially used as a gender-neutral term for a person's partner in an intimate relationship[1] without disclosing or presuming anything about marital status, relationship status, or sexual orientation. Synonyms with similar properties include sweetheart, better half, spouse, domestic partner, lover, soulmate, or life partner. In the United States, the term is sometimes used in invitations, such as to weddings and office parties. This use of the term has become common in the UK in correspondence from hospitals, e.g., "you may be accompanied for your appointment by a significant other".[citation needed]Contents1 Scientific use 2 First use 3 See also 4 ReferencesScientific use[edit] Its usage in psychology and sociology is very different from its colloquial use. In psychology, a significant other is any person who has great importance to an individual's life or well-being
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14th Academy Awards
The 14th Academy Awards
Academy Awards
honored American film achievements in 1941 and was held in the Biltmore Bowl at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California. The ceremony is now considered notable, in retrospect, as the year in which Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
failed to win Best Picture, which instead was awarded to John Ford's How Green Was My Valley. Ford won his third award for Best Director, becoming the second to accomplish three wins in that category, and the first to win in consecutive years (having won for The Grapes of Wrath the previous year). Most public attention was focused on the Best Actress race between sibling rivals Joan Fontaine
Joan Fontaine
in Alfred Hitchcock’s Suspicion and Olivia de Havilland
Olivia de Havilland
for Hold Back the Dawn
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Short Film
A short film is any motion picture not long enough to be considered a feature film. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
defines a short film as "an original motion picture that has a running time of 40 minutes or less, including all credits".[1] The term featurette originally applied to a film longer than a short subject, but shorter than a standard feature film. The increasingly rare term "short subject" means approximately the same thing. It is an industry term which carries more of an assumption that the film is shown as part of a presentation along with a feature film. "Short" is an abbreviation for either term. Short films are often screened at local, national, or international film festivals and made by independent filmmakers for non profit, either with a low budget or no budget at all. They are usually funded by film grants, non profit organizations, sponsor, or personal funds
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Male
A male (♂) organism is the physiological sex that produces sperm. Each spermatozoon can fuse with a larger female gamete, or ovum, in the process of fertilization. A male cannot reproduce sexually without access to at least one ovum from a female, but some organisms can reproduce both sexually and asexually. Most male mammals, including male humans, have a Y chromosome, which codes for the production of larger amounts of testosterone to develop male reproductive organs. Not all species share a common sex-determination system. In most animals, including humans, sex is determined genetically, but in some species it can be determined due to social, environmental, or other factors
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Mouse
A mouse (Mus), plural mice is a small rodent characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, a body-length scaly tail and a high breeding rate. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is also a popular pet. In some places, certain kinds of field mice are locally common. They are known to invade homes for food and shelter. Domestic mice sold as pets often differ substantially in size from the common house mouse. This is attributable both to breeding and to different conditions in the wild
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Academy Award For Best Animated Short Film
The Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film is an award given by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
(AMPAS) as part of the Academy Awards
Academy Awards
annually since the 5th Academy Awards, covering the year 1931–32, to the present. This category was known as "Short Subjects, Cartoons" from 1932 until 1970, and as "Short Subjects, Animated Films" from 1971 to 1973. The present title began with the 1974 awards. In the listings below, the title shown in boldface was the winner of the award, followed by the other nominees for that year. This category is notable for giving Walt Disney 12 of his 22 Academy Awards, including a posthumous 1968 award, and also 10 of the first 11 awards awarded in the category
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Mascot
A mascot is any person, animal, or object thought to bring luck, or anything used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team, society, military unit, or brand name. Mascots are also used as fictional, representative spokespeople for consumer products, such as the rabbit used in advertising and marketing for the General Mills
General Mills
brand of breakfast cereal, Trix.Hubbard eagle, Hubbard Ohio 5'10" - 6'5"The mascot for the 2007 Special
Special
Olympics, held in Shanghai, China. Displayed in Pudong just in front of the Shanghai Science and Technology Museum.In the world of sports, mascots are also used for merchandising. Team mascots are often confused with team nicknames.[1] While the two can be interchangeable, they are not always the same
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Sound Film
A sound film is a motion picture with synchronized sound, or sound technologically coupled to image, as opposed to a silent film. The first known public exhibition of projected sound films took place in Paris in 1900, but decades passed before sound motion pictures were made commercially practical. Reliable synchronization was difficult to achieve with the early sound-on-disc systems, and amplification and recording quality were also inadequate. Innovations in sound-on-film led to the first commercial screening of short motion pictures using the technology, which took place in 1923. The primary steps in the commercialization of sound cinema were taken in the mid- to late 1920s. At first, the sound films which included synchronized dialogue, known as "talking pictures", or "talkies", were exclusively shorts. The earliest feature-length movies with recorded sound included only music and effects
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Comic Strip
A comic strip is a sequence of drawings arranged in interrelated panels to display brief humor or form a narrative, often serialized, with text in balloons and captions. Traditionally, throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, these have been published in newspapers and magazines, with horizontal strips printed in black-and-white in daily newspapers, while Sunday newspapers offered longer sequences in special color comics sections. With the development of the internet, they began to appear online as webcomics. There were more than 200 different comic strips and daily cartoon panels in American newspapers alone each day for most of the 20th century, for a total of at least 7,300,000 episodes.[1] Strips are written and drawn by a comics artist or cartoonist
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Anthropomorphism
Anthropomorphism
Anthropomorphism
is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.[1] It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.[2] Personification is the related attribution of human form and characteristics to abstract concepts such as nations, emotions and natural forces like seasons and the weather. Both have ancient roots as storytelling and artistic devices, and most cultures have traditional fables with anthropomorphized animals as characters
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Floyd Gottfredson
Gottfredson
Gottfredson
may refer to: Floyd Gottfredson (1905–1986), American cartoonist best known for his defining work on the Mickey Mouse comic strip Linda Gottfredson (born 1947), professor of educational psychology at the University of Delaware Michael R. Gottfredson
Michael R. Gottfredson
(born 1951), the former President of the University of OregonSee also[edit] Floyd Gottfredson Library, a series of books collecting the first 25 years of the 45-year span of work by Floyd Gottfredson on the daily Mickey Mouse comic stripThis page lists people with the surname Gottfredson
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