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Michel Petit
Michel Petit
Michel Petit
(born February 12, 1964) is a retired professional ice hockey player who played in the National Hockey League
National Hockey League
(NHL) from the 1982–83 NHL season to the 1998–99 NHL season. Upon his retirement Petit had played for a then-NHL record 10 different teams. This mark has since been surpassed by Mike Sillinger. Currently, Petit resides in The Woodlands, Texas and is a sales manager for Smart Sand working in Canada
Canada
and the US.Contents1 Playing career 2 Career statistics2.1 Regular season and playoffs3 External linksPlaying career[edit] Petit was drafted by the Vancouver Canucks
Vancouver Canucks
in the 1982 NHL Entry Draft in the first round, eleventh overall. During his 17 seasons in the NHL he played for 10 different NHL teams, which, along with J
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Minor Ice Hockey
Minor hockey is an umbrella term for amateur ice hockey which is played below the junior age level. Players are classified by age, with each age group playing in its own league. The rules, especially as it relates to body contact, vary from class to class. In North America, the rules are governed by the national bodies, Hockey Canada
Hockey Canada
and USA Hockey, while local hockey associations administer players and leagues for their region
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1996–97 NHL Season
The 1996–97 NHL season was the 80th regular season of the National Hockey League. The Stanley Cup
Stanley Cup
winners were the Detroit Red Wings, who swept the Philadelphia Flyers
Philadelphia Flyers
in four games and won the Stanley Cup for the first time in 42 years. The regular season saw a decline in scoring and rise in the number of shutouts to an all-time record of 127.[1] This trend continued into the playoffs, during which an all-time record of 18 shutouts were recorded.[2] Only two players, Mario Lemieux
Mario Lemieux
and Teemu Selanne, reached the 100-point plateau during the regular season[3] (compared with 12 who reached the plateau in 1995–96[4]). Many factors, including fewer power plays, more calls of the skate-in-the-crease rule, fewer shots on goal and more injuries to star players than the season before, contributed to the reduction in scoring and skyrocketing in shutouts
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1988–89 NHL Season
The 1988–89 NHL season
1988–89 NHL season
was the 72nd season of the National Hockey League. The Calgary Flames
Calgary Flames
won an all-Canadian Stanley Cup
Stanley Cup
final against the Montreal Canadiens
Montreal Canadiens
four games to two
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1989–90 NHL Season
The 1989–90 NHL season was the 73rd season of the National Hockey League. The Stanley Cup winners were the Edmonton Oilers, who won the best of seven series 4–1 against the Boston Bruins
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1990–91 NHL Season
The 1990–91 NHL season
1990–91 NHL season
was the 74th season of the National Hockey League. The Stanley Cup winners were the Pittsburgh Penguins, who won the best of seven series 4–2 against the Minnesota North Stars. This was the last NHL season to end in the month of May.Contents1 League business 2 Regular season2.1 Final standings3 Playoffs3.1 Playoff bracket 3.2 Stanley Cup Finals4 Awards4.1 All-Star teams5 Player statistics5.1 Scoring leaders 5.2 Leading goaltenders6 Coaches6.1 Patrick Division 6.2 Adams Division 6.3 Norris Division 6.4 Smythe Division7 Milestones7.1 Debuts 7.2 Last games8 Trading deadline 9 Hat-tricks 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksLeague business[edit] At meetings in Florida in December, the NHL Board of Governors awarded provisional franchises to groups from Ottawa and Tampa
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1991–92 NHL Season
The 1991–92 NHL season
1991–92 NHL season
was the 75th regular season of the National Hockey League. The Pittsburgh Penguins
Pittsburgh Penguins
repeated as Stanley Cup champions, winning a best of seven series four games to none against the Chicago Blackhawks.Contents1 League business1.1 Throwback uniforms2 Regular season2.1 Final standings2.1.1 Wales Conference 2.1.2 Campbell Conference3 Playoffs3.1 Playoff bracket 3.2 Stanley Cup Finals4 Awards4.1 All-Star teams5 Player statistics5.1 Scoring leaders 5.2 Leading goaltenders6 Coaches6.1 Patrick Division 6.2 Adams Division 6.3 Norris Division 6.4 Smythe Division7 Milestones7.1 Debuts 7.2 Last games8 Hat tricks 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksLeague business[edit] As mentioned above, 1991–92 was the 75th anniversary season for the NHL
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1992–93 NHL Season
The 1992–93 NHL season
1992–93 NHL season
was the 76th regular season of the National Hockey League. Each player wore a patch on their jersey throughout the 1992–93 regular season and playoffs to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Stanley Cup. It proved, at the time, to be the highest-scoring regular season in NHL history, as a total of 7,311 goals were scored over 1,008 games for an average of 7.25 per game.[1] Twenty of the twenty-four teams scored three goals or more per game, and only two teams, the Toronto Maple Leafs
Toronto Maple Leafs
and the Chicago Blackhawks, allowed fewer than three goals per game
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1993–94 NHL Season
The 1993–94 NHL season
1993–94 NHL season
was the 77th regular season of the National Hockey League. The New York Rangers
New York Rangers
were the Stanley Cup
Stanley Cup
champions. It was the Rangers' fourth championship overall, and their first in 54 seasons, since 1939–40. The spectacular play of Dominik Hasek of the Buffalo Sabres
Buffalo Sabres
ushered in a new era of goaltending dominance in the NHL
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1994–95 NHL Season
The 1994–95 NHL season was the 78th regular season of the National Hockey League. The teams played a shortened season, due to a lockout of the players by the owners. In addition, the NHL All-Star Game, which had been scheduled to take place January 20–21, 1995, in San Jose, California, was canceled. San Jose was eventually selected as the venue for the 1997 NHL All-Star Game
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1995–96 NHL Season
The 1995–96 NHL season was the 79th regular season of the National Hockey League. The Stanley Cup winners were the Colorado Avalanche, who, in their first year as the Avalanche, swept the Florida Panthers in four games.Contents1 League business 2 Regular season2.1 Final standings3 Playoffs3.1 Stanley Cup Final 3.2 Playoff bracket4 Awards4.1 All-Star teams5 Player statistics5.1 Scoring leaders 5.2 Leading goaltenders6 Milestones6.1 Debuts 6.2 Last games7 Trading deadline 8 Coaches8.1 Eastern Conference 8.2 Western Conference9 See also 10 References 11 External linksLeague business[edit] The 1995–96 season was the first season in Denver for the Avalanche, who had relocated from Quebec City
Quebec City
where they were previously known as the Quebec Nordiques. Prior to the season, Colorado was assigned to the Pacific Division of the Western Conference
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Regular Season
In an organized sports league, a typical season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session: for example, in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
the season lasts approximately from April to October.[1] In other team sports, like association football or basketball, it is generally from August or September to May although in some countries - such as Northern Europe
Europe
or East Asia - the season starts in the spring and finishes in autumn, mainly due to weather conditions encountered during the winter. A year can often be broken up into several distinct sections (sometimes themselves called seasons)
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1998–99 NHL Season
The 1998–99 NHL season was the 82nd regular season of the National Hockey League
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Playoffs
The playoffs, play-offs, postseason and/or finals of a sports league are a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Depending on the league, the playoffs may be either a single game, a series of games, or a tournament, and may use a single-elimination system or one of several other different playoff formats. Playoff, in regard to international fixtures, is to qualify or progress to the next round of a competition or tournament. In team sports in the U.S. and Canada, the vast distances and consequent burdens on cross-country travel have led to regional divisions of teams. Generally, during the regular season, teams play more games in their division than outside it, but the league's best teams might not play against each other in the regular season. Therefore, in the postseason a playoff series is organized
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Season (sports)
In an organized sports league, a typical season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session: for example, in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
the season lasts approximately from April to October.[1] In other team sports, like association football or basketball, it is generally from August or September to May although in some countries - such as Northern Europe
Europe
or East Asia - the season starts in the spring and finishes in autumn, mainly due to weather conditions encountered during the winter. A year can often be broken up into several distinct sections (sometimes themselves called seasons)
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Goal (ice Hockey)
In ice hockey, a goal is scored when the puck entirely crosses the goal line between the two goal posts and below the goal crossbar. A goal awards one point to the team attacking the goal scored upon, regardless of which team the player who actually deflected the puck into the goal belongs to (see also own goal). Typically, a player on the team attempting to score shoots the puck with his/her stick towards the goal net opening, and a player on the opposing team called a goaltender tries to block the shot to prevent a goal from being scored against his/her team. The term goal may also refer to the structure in which goals are scored. The ice hockey goal is rectangular in shape; the front frame of the goal is made of steel tube painted red (or another color depending on the league) and consists of two vertical goalposts and a horizontal crossbar. A net is attached to the back of the frame to catch pucks that enter the goal and also to prevent pucks from entering it from behind
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