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Michael Massing
Michael Massing is a contributing editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. Michael Massing received his Bachelor of Arts from Harvard and an MS from the London School of Economics
London School of Economics
and Political Science. He often writes for the New York Review of Books
New York Review of Books
concerning the media and foreign affairs. He has written for The American Prospect, The New York Times, The New Yorker
The New Yorker
and The Atlantic Monthly. In addition to his magazine contributions, he has written on the War on Drugs
War on Drugs
in his book, The Fix (2002), and on American journalism, Now They Tell Us: The American Press and Iraq
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Columbia Journalism Review
The Columbia Journalism
Journalism
Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists that has been published by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
Journalism
since 1961. Its contents include news and media industry trends, analysis, professional ethics, and stories behind news. In October 2015, it was announced that the publishing frequency of the print magazine was being reduced from six to two issues per year in order to focus on digital operations.[2]Contents1 Organization board 2 Finances 3 Editor 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrganization board[edit] The current chairman is Stephen J
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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London School Of Economics
The London
London
School of Economics (officially The London
London
School of Economics and Political Science, often referred to as LSE) is a public research university located in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1895 by Fabian Society members Sidney Webb, Beatrice Webb, Graham Wallas, and George Bernard Shaw for the betterment of society, LSE joined the University of London
London
in 1900 and established its first degree courses under the auspices of the University in 1901.[5] The LSE has awarded its own degrees since 2008,[6] prior to which it awarded degrees of the University of London. LSE is located in Westminster, central London, near the boundary between Covent Garden
Covent Garden
and Holborn. The area is historically known as Clare Market
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New York Review Of Books
The New York Review of Books
The New York Review of Books
(or NYREV or NYRB) is a semi-monthly magazine[2] with articles on literature, culture, economics, science and current affairs. Published in New York City, it is inspired by the idea that the discussion of important books is an indispensable literary activity. Esquire called it "the premier literary-intellectual magazine in the English language."[3] In 1970 writer Tom Wolfe
Tom Wolfe
described it as "the chief theoretical organ of Radical Chic".[4] The Review publishes long-form reviews and essays, often by well-known writers, original poetry, and has letters and personals advertising sections that had attracted critical comment. In 1979 the magazine founded the London Review of Books, which soon became independent. In 1990 it founded an Italian edition, la Rivista dei Libri, published until 2010. Robert B. Silvers
Robert B

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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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The New Yorker
The New Yorker
The New Yorker
is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. It is published by Condé Nast. Started as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is now published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker
The New Yorker
has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally
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The Atlantic Monthly
The Atlantic
The Atlantic
is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher, founded in 1857 as The Atlantic
The Atlantic
Monthly in Boston, Massachusetts. The magazine was created as a literary and cultural commentary magazine, and published leading writers' commentary on abolition, education, and other major issues in contemporary political affairs. The magazine's initiator, and one of the founders, was Francis H. Underwood,[3][4] The other founding sponsors were prominent writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Greenleaf Whittier.[5][6] James Russell Lowell
James Russell Lowell
was its first editor.[7] After struggling with financial hardship and a series of ownership changes since the late 20th century, the magazine was reformatted in the early 21st century as a general editorial magazine
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War On Drugs
War on Drugs is an American term[6][7] usually applied to the U.S. federal government's campaign of prohibition of drugs, military aid, and military intervention, with the stated aim being to reduce the illegal drug trade.[8][9] The initiative includes a set of drug policies that are intended to discourage the production, distribution, and consumption of psychoactive drugs that the participating governments and the UN have made illegal. The term was popularized by the media shortly after a press conference given on June 18, 1971, by President Richard Nixon—the day after publication of a special message from President Nixon to the Congress on Drug Abuse Prevention and Control—during which he declared drug abuse "public enemy number one"
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Orville Schell
Orville Hickock Schell III (Chinese: 夏伟; pinyin: Xià Wěi; born May 20, 1940) is an American writer, academic, and activist. He is known for his works on China, and is the Arthur Ross Director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society in New York. He previously served as Dean of the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.Contents1 Background and education 2 Journalism career 3 Farming career 4 Views on China 5 Publications 6 External links 7 ReferencesBackground and education[edit] Schell's father Orville Hickok Schell, Jr., was a prominent lawyer who headed the New York City Bar Association, chaired the human rights group Americas Watch from its founding in 1981 until his death in 1987, co-founded Helsinki Watch, forerunner to Human Rights Watch, and became the namesake of the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights at Yale Law School
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C-SPAN
AMC11 at 131.0°W7: C-SPAN
C-SPAN
(Analog) (SD)CableVerizon FiOS 109: C-SPAN
C-SPAN
(SD) 110: C-SPAN2 (SD) 111: C-SPAN3 (SD)Wave Broadband 16 (C-SPAN) 99 (C-SPAN2)Available on most other U.S. cable systems Consult your local cable provider for channel availabilitySatellite radioXM 120[1]IPTVAT&T U-verse 230: C-SPAN
C-SPAN
(SD) 231: C-SPAN2 (SD) 232: C-SPAN3 (SD)Google Fiber 131: C-SPAN 132: C-SPAN2 133: C-SPAN3Cable One 78 (SD)Streaming mediaAvailable to current cable/satellite subscribers C-SPAN
C-SPAN
Live and on demand C-SPAN
C-SPAN
(/ˈsiːˌspæn/), an acronym for Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network, is an American cable and satellite television network that was created in 1979 by the cable television industry as a public service
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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The American Prospect
The American Prospect is a daily online and quarterly print American political and public policy magazine dedicated to American liberalism and progressivism. Based in Washington, D.C., The American Prospect says it aims "to advance liberal and progressive goals through reporting, analysis, and debate about today's realities and tomorrow's possibilities."[3]Contents1 History 2 Format 3 Contributors 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The magazine was founded in 1990 (and initially called The Liberal Prospect) by Robert Kuttner, Robert Reich, and Paul Starr
Paul Starr
as a response to the perceived ascendancy of conservatism in the 1980s. Robert Kuttner
Robert Kuttner
and Paul Starr
Paul Starr
currently serve as Co-Editors. Harold Meyerson serves as Executive Editor
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MacArthur Fellowship
The MacArthur Fellows Program, MacArthur Fellowship, or "Genius Grant", is a prize awarded annually by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation typically to between 20 and 30 individuals, working in any field, who have shown "extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction" and are citizens or residents of the United States.[1] According to the Foundation's website, "the fellowship is not a reward for past accomplishment, but rather an investment in a person's originality, insight, and potential". The current prize is $625,000 paid over five years in quarterly installments. This figure was increased from $500,000 in 2013 with the release of a review[2] of the MacArthur Fellows Program. Since 1981, 942 people have been named MacArthur Fellows,[3] ranging in age from 18 to 82.[4] The award has been called "one of the most significant awards that is truly 'no strings attached'".[5] The Program allows no applications
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Michael Massing
Michael Massing is a contributing editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. Michael Massing received his Bachelor of Arts from Harvard and an MS from the London School of Economics
London School of Economics
and Political Science. He often writes for the New York Review of Books
New York Review of Books
concerning the media and foreign affairs. He has written for The American Prospect, The New York Times, The New Yorker
The New Yorker
and The Atlantic Monthly. In addition to his magazine contributions, he has written on the War on Drugs
War on Drugs
in his book, The Fix (2002), and on American journalism, Now They Tell Us: The American Press and Iraq
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