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Mexican Literature
Mexican literature
Mexican literature
is one of the most prolific and influential of Spanish language
Spanish language
literatures along with those of Spain, Argentina
Argentina
and Cuba
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Kalimán
Kalimán
Kalimán
or Kalimán, the Incredible Man is a popular Mexican adventurer superhero created by Rafael Cutberto Navarro and Modesto Vázquez González in 1963 as the main character of a Radio drama
Radio drama
with the same title which depicts the adventures of Kalimán, an Egyptian descendent of the Pharaohs, and his young companion Solín. Kalimán is very well known and popular across Latin America, and the radio series spawned into a comic book and a couple of movies. The adventures of Kalimán
Kalimán
were published as a serialized weekly comic which was printed for twenty-six consecutive years, reaching its highest popularity in 1965, and it is still being quite popular today in reprints or paperbacks
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Rodolfo Usigli
Rodolfo Usigli (November 17, 1905 – June 18, 1979) was a Mexican playwright. He was called the "playwright of the Mexican Revolution." Usigli born to an Italian father and a Polish mother in Mexico
Mexico
City. Usigli spent a year in the National Conservatory of Music before deciding that his real passion was theater. He studied drama at Yale from 1935-1936 on a Rockefeller scholarship, later becoming a professor and diplomat. It was during his time as a diplomat in 1945 that he met George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
in London.[1] After returning to Mexico
Mexico
from the U.S., he established the Midnight Theater and also became a member of the literary circle that formed around the journal Contemporary.[2] During the 1930s, he directed radio dramas. In 1937, Usigli brought out his book, The Gesticulating Demagogues. The book's manuscript had been read by Shaw
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Porfirio Diaz
José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz
Porfirio Díaz
Mori (Spanish pronunciation: [porˈfiɾjo ði.as]; 15 September 1830 – 2 July 1915) was a Mexican general and politician who served seven terms as President of Mexico, a total of three and a half decades, from 1876 to 1880 and from 1884 to 1911. A veteran of the War of the Reform (1858–60) and the French intervention in Mexico
Mexico
(1862–67), Díaz rose to the rank of General, leading republican troops against the French-imposed rule of Emperor Maximilian. Seizing power in a coup in 1876, Díaz and his allies, a group of technocrats known as "Científicos",[1] ruled Mexico
Mexico
for the next thirty-five years, a period known as the Porfiriato. Díaz has always been a controversial figure in Mexican history; while the Porfirian regime brought stability after decades of conflict, it grew unpopular due to civil repression and political stagnation
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Ignacio Rodríguez Galván
Ignacio Rodríguez Galván is considered to be first Mexican Romantic writer. He was born in Tizayuca, Hidalgo, Mexico in 1816 and died in Havana, Cuba in 1842 at age 26 from yellow fever. During his short life, much of his poetry and plays were concerned with the political situation in Mexico and include works such as Profecía de Guatimoc, Al baile del señor Presidente, Adiós, oh patria mía and La gota de hiel. He also founded a newspaper called Año Nuevo, writing for it as well.[1] References[edit]^ Jimenez Gonzalez, Victor Manuel, ed. (2010). Hidalgo: Guía para descubrir los encantos del estado [Hidalgo: Guide to discover the charms of the state] (in Spanish). Mexico City: Editorial Océano de Mexico SA de CV. p. 14
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Modernism
Modernism
Modernism
is a philosophical movement that, along with cultural trends and changes, arose from wide-scale and far-reaching transformations in Western society during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among the factors that shaped modernism were the development of modern industrial societies and the rapid growth of cities, followed then by reactions of horror to World War I. Modernism
Modernism
also rejected the certainty of Enlightenment thinking, and many modernists rejected religious belief.[2][3] Modernism, in general, includes the activities and creations of those who felt the traditional forms of art, architecture, literature, religious faith, philosophy, social organization, activities of daily life, and even the sciences, were becoming ill-fitted to their tasks and outdated in the new economic, social, and political environment of an emerging fully industrialized world
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Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera
Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera (/ɡʊˈtjɛrəs ˈnɑːhərə/; December 22, 1859 – February 3, 1895) was a Mexican writer and political figure.Contents1 Early life 2 Literary activity and reputation 3 Notes 4 External linksEarly life[edit] Gutiérrez Nájera was born in Mexico City on December 22, 1859, and in his youth worked as a journalist and was elected as a Deputy. He died in Mexico City. Literary activity and reputation[edit] As a writer, he was a precursor of the Latin American literary movement of modernismo. Also a writer of short stories, collections of these include 1883's Cuentos frágiles ("Gossamer Stories") and 1898's Cuentos de color de humo ("Smoke-colored Stories")
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Efren Rebolledo
Efrén Rebolledo (1877-1929) was a Mexican poet and lawyer. Biography[edit] Rebolledo was born in Actopan, Hidalgo. He was baptized and entered into the civil registry in Pachuca as Santiago Procopio, a name he changed before entering preparatory school
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José Juan Tablada
José Juan Tablada
José Juan Tablada
(April 3, 1871 – August 2, 1945) was a Mexican poet, art critic and, for a brief period, diplomat. A pioneer of oriental studies, and champion of Mexican art, he spent a good portion of his life outside his country. As a poet, his work spans from the fin-de-siècle style to avant-garde experimentalism; he was especially an early haiku pioneer.Contents1 Career 2 Poetry 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksCareer[edit] Tablada was born in Mexico
Mexico
City and at first worked for the national railways. In 1890, aged 19, he began contributing to magazines and newspapers as a journalist, essayist and poet. In 1894 his rhythmic and intricate poem "Onix"[1] brought him renown
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Enrique González Martínez
Enrique González Martínez (April 13, 1871 in Guadalajara, Jalisco – February 19, 1952 in Mexico City) was a Mexican poet, diplomat, surgeon and obstetrician. His poetry is considered to be primarily Modernist in nature, with elements of French symbolism.Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 External links 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Martínez received his early education at home. At the age of 10 he entered preparatory school, the Council Seminary, and the Liceo de Varones (Men's Grammar School) of the State of Jalisco. In 1893 Martínez received his doctorate degree in Guadalajara. During that same year he published a few verses in newspapers and magazines. Soon after receiving his degree, he was named adjunct professor of physiology at the School of Medicine. After two years of professional practice, he left his native city to go to Culiacán, Sinaloa
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Mariano Azuela
Mariano Azuela
Mariano Azuela
González (January 1, 1873 – March 1, 1952) was a Mexican author and physician, best known for his fictional stories of the Mexican Revolution
Mexican Revolution
of 1910. He wrote novels, works for theatre and literary criticism. He is the first of the "novelists of the Revolution," and he influenced other Mexican novelists of social protest. Among Azuela's first published writing were some short pieces for the magazine Gil Blas Cómico, where he wrote under the pen name of "Beleño", and his writing published under the heading Impresiones de un estudiante (Impressions of a Student) in 1896. His first novel, Maria Luisa, was written in 1907, followed by Los fracasados (The Failures) in 1908, and Mala yerba (Weeds) in 1909. The theme of his beginning novels are about fate. He wrote of the social life of Mexicans during the Díaz dictatorship
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Indigenous Peoples Of Mexico
Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
of Mexico
Mexico
(Spanish: pueblos indígenas de México), Native Mexicans (Spanish: nativos mexicanos), or Mexican Native Americans (Spanish: nativo america mex
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Americas
Largest metropolitan areas Largest citiesList1.São Paulo 2.Lima 3. Mexico
Mexico
City 4.New York City 5.Bogotá 6.Rio de Janeiro 7.Santiago 8.Los Angeles 9.Caracas 10.Buenos AiresCIA political map of the Americas
Americas
in Lambert azimuthal equal-area projectionThe Americas
Americas
(also collectively called America)[5][6][7] comprise the totality of the continents of North and South America.[8][9][10] Together, they make up most of the land in Earth's western hemisphere[11][12][13][14][15][16] and comprise the New World. Along with their associated islands, they cover 8% of Earth's total surface area and 28.4% of its land area. The topography is dominated by the American Cordillera, a long chain of mountains that runs the length of the west coast. The flatter eastern side of the Americas
Americas
is dominated by large river basins, such as the Amazon, St
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Arqueles Vela
Arqueles Vela (Guatemala/ Tapachula
Tapachula
1899 – Mexico City
Mexico City
1977) was a Mexican writer, journalist and teacher, of Guatemalan origin
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Manuel Maples Arce
Manuel Maples Arce (May 1, 1900 - June 26, 1981) was a Mexican poet, writer, art critic, lawyer and diplomat, especially known as the founder of the Stridentism movement.Contents1 The leader of the first Mexican avant-garde movement 2 Posterity 3 Bibliography3.1 Spanish editions 3.2 Translations3.2.1 English 3.2.2 Other languages3.3 Critical referencesThe leader of the first Mexican avant-garde movement[edit] After the first Stridentist manifesto, Comprimido estridentista, launched in 1921 in the n°1 of the broadsheet Actual, he published in 1922 his first avant-gardist book of poetry, Andamios interiores (Poemas radiograficos), that Jorge Luis Borges criticized the same year; in 1924, Urbe (Super-poema bolchevique en 5 cantos), which English version, made by John Dos Passos, was edited in 1929 in New York (this edition is maybe the first poetry book of a Mexican, and the first of the Spanish language avant-garde, translated into English); in
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Salvador Novo
Salvador Novo López (30 July 1904 – 13 January 1974) was a Mexican writer, poet, playwright, translator, television presenter, entrepreneur, and the official chronicler of Mexico City. As a noted intellectual, he influenced popular perceptions of politics, media, the arts, and Mexican society in general. He was a member of Los Contemporáneos, a group of Mexican writers, as well as of the Mexican Academy of the Language.Contents1 Main characteristics 2 Works 3 Theatre 4 ReferencesMain characteristics[edit] Novo defied the machismo and conservative Catholicism prevalent in 20th century Mexican culture by making almost no efforts to conceal his sexuality.[1] He was, however, accepted by the Mexican government. He held official posts related to culture, was elected to the Mexican Language Academy, and had a television program on Mexico City's history
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