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Mersa Matruh
Mersa Matruh
Mersa Matruh
(Arabic: مرسى مطروح‎, IPA: [ˈmæɾsæ mɑtˤˈɾuːħ]) is a seaport in Egypt, the capital of the Matrouh Governorate. It is 240 km (150 mi) west of Alexandria
Alexandria
and 222 km from Sallum, on the main highway from the Nile Delta
Nile Delta
to the Libyan border. Another highway leads south from the town, toward the Western Desert and the oases of Siwa and Bahariya. During Ancient Egyptian times and during the reign of Alexander The Great, the city was known as Amunia. In Ptolemaic and Byzantine times it was known as Paraitonion (Παραιτόνιον), while in Roman times it was called Paraetonium. Marsa Matruh
Marsa Matruh
is a major tourist resort and serves as a getaway resort for Europeans as well as Cairenes. It is served by Marsa Matruh Airport
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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Northern Coast Of Egypt
The northern coast of Egypt
Egypt
(Egyptian Arabic: الساحل الشمالى‎ El Sāḥel El Šamāli, north coast, commonly shortened to الساحل El Sāḥel, "the coast") extends for about 1,050 km (650 mi) along the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
from the eastern side of the Sinai Peninsula
Sinai Peninsula
at the Egypt-Gaza border
Egypt-Gaza border
to the western village of Sallum
Sallum
at Egypt's border with Libya. It is one of the longest Mediterranean coastlines in North Africa. The city of Alexandria
Alexandria
lies at the center of Egypt's Mediterranean coastline in Lower Egypt
Egypt
(northern Egypt), as chosen by Alexander the Great in the 4th century BCE
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Ramesses II
Ramesses II
Ramesses II
/ˈræməsiːz, ˈræmsiːz, ˈræmziːz/ (variously spelled also Rameses[5] or Ramses;[6] born c. 1303 BC; died July or August 1213 BC; reigned 1279–1213[7] BC), also known as Ramesses the Great, was the third pharaoh of the 19th Dynasty of Egypt. He is often regarded as the greatest, most celebrated, and most powerful pharaoh of the Egyptian Empire.[8] His successors and later Egyptians called him the "Great Ancestor". He is known as Ozymandias in the Greek sources,[9] from a transliteration into Greek of a part of Ramesses' throne name, Usermaatre Setepenre, "The justice of
is powerful—chosen of Rê".[10] Ramesses II
Ramesses II
led several military expeditions into the Levant, reasserting Egyptian control over Canaan. He also led expeditions to the south, into Nubia, commemorated in inscriptions at Beit el-Wali and Gerf Hussein
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Railway
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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El Alamein
El Alamein
El Alamein
(Arabic: العلمين‎, IPA: [elʕælæˈmeːn], literally "the two flags") is a town in the northern Matrouh Governorate of Egypt. Located on the Mediterranean Sea, it lies 106 kilometres (66 mi) west of Alexandria
Alexandria
and 240 kilometres (149 mi) northwest of Cairo
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Hot Desert Climate
The Desert
Desert
climate (in the Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
BWh and BWk, sometimes also BWn), also known as an arid climate, is a climate in which precipitation is too low to sustain any vegetation at all, or at most a very scanty shrub,[citation needed] and does not meet the criteria to be classified as a polar climate. An area that features this climate usually experiences from 25 to 200 mm (7.87 inches) per year of precipitation[1] and in some years may experience no precipitation at all. Averages may be even less such as in Arica, Chile, where precipitation normals annually stand at around 1 mm per year
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Köppen Climate Classification
Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Köppen
Wladimir Köppen
in 1884,[2][3] with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936.[4][5] Later, German climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1954, 1961) collaborated with Köppen on changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.[6][7] The Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
system has been further modified, within the Trewartha climate classification
Trewartha climate classification
system in the middle 1960s (revised in 1980)
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Mediterranean Sea
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
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Precipitation (meteorology)
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
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Governorates Of Egypt
For administrative purposes, Egypt
Egypt
is divided into twenty-seven governorates (محافظة muḥāfaẓah; Egyptian Arabic pronunciation: [moˈħɑfzˤɑ]; genitive case: muḥāfaẓat  [moˈħɑfzˤet]; plural: محافظات muḥāfaẓāt [moħɑfˈzˤɑːt]).[1] Egyptian governorates are the top tier of the country's jurisdiction hierarchy. A governorate is administered by a governor, who is appointed by the President of Egypt
Egypt
and serves at the president's discretion
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Ice Pellets
Ice pellets
Ice pellets
are a form of precipitation consisting of small, translucent balls of ice. Ice pellets
Ice pellets
are smaller than hailstones[1] which form in thunderstorms rather than in winter, and are different from graupel ("soft hail") which is made of frosty white rime, and from a mixture of rain and snow which is a slushy liquid or semisolid. Ice pellets
Ice pellets
often bounce when they hit the ground or other solid objects, and make a higher-pitched "tap" when striking objects like jackets, windshields, and dried leaves, compared to the dull splat of liquid raindrops. Pellets generally do not freeze into a solid mass unless mixed with freezing rain
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Hail
Hail
Hail
is a form of solid precipitation. It is distinct from ice pellets (American sleet), though the two are often confused.[1] It consists of balls or irregular lumps of ice, each of which is called a hailstone. Ice
Ice
pellets (American sleet) fall generally in cold weather while hail growth is greatly inhibited during cold surface temperatures.[2] Unlike other forms of water ice such as graupel, which is made of rime, and ice pellets, which are smaller and translucent, hailstones usually measure between 5 millimetres (0.2 in) and 15 centimetres (6 in) in diameter. The METAR reporting code for hail 5 mm (0.20 in) or greater is GR, while smaller hailstones and graupel are coded GS. Hail
Hail
is possible within most thunderstorms as it is produced by cumulonimbus,[3] and within 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) of the parent storm
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