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Meiji Period
The Meiji period
Meiji period
(明治時代, Meiji-jidai), also known as the Meiji era, is a Japanese era which extended from October 23, 1868, to July 30, 1912.[1] This period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan
Japan
during which Japanese society moved from being an isolated feudal society to its modern form. Fundamental changes affected its social structure, internal politics, economy, military, and foreign relations. The period corresponded to the reign of Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
after 1868, and lasted until his death in 1912
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Japanese Currency
Japanese currency
Japanese currency
has a history covering the period from the 8th century to the present
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Anno Domini
The terms anno Domini[a][1][2] (AD) and before Christ[b][3][4][5] (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
and means "in the year of the Lord",[6] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord",[7][8] taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus
Jesus
Christ". This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, with AD counting years from the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the era. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC
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Occupation Of Japan
A job, or occupation, is a person's role in society. More specifically, a job is an activity, often regular and often performed in exchange for payment ("for a living"). Many people have multiple jobs (e.g., parent, homemaker, and employee). A person can begin a job by becoming an employee, volunteering, starting a business, or becoming a parent. The duration of a job may range from temporary (e.g., hourly odd jobs) to a lifetime (e.g., judges). An activity that requires a person's mental or physical effort is work (as in "a day's work"). If a person is trained for a certain type of job, they may have a profession. Typically, a job would be a subset of someone's career
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Japanese Economic Miracle
The Japanese economic miracle
Japanese economic miracle
was Japan's record period of economic growth between the post- World War II
World War II
era to the end of Cold War. During the economic boom, Japan
Japan
rapidly became the world's second largest economy (after the United States)
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Before Christ
The terms anno Domini[a][1][2] (AD) and before Christ[b][3][4][5] (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
and means "in the year of the Lord",[6] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord",[7][8] taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus
Jesus
Christ". This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, with AD counting years from the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the era. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC
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Feudalism
Feudalism
Feudalism
was a combination of legal and military customs in medieval Europe that flourished between the 9th and 15th centuries
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Heisei Period
The Heisei period
Heisei period
(Japanese: 平成時代, Hepburn: Heisei jidai) is the current era in Japan. The Heisei period
Heisei period
started on 8 January 1989, the day after the death of the Emperor Hirohito. His son, the 125th Emperor Akihito, acceded to the throne. In accordance with Japanese customs, Hirohito
Hirohito
was posthumously renamed the 124th "Emperor Shōwa" on 31 January 1989. Thus, 1989 corresponds to Shōwa 64 until 7 January, and Heisei 1 (平成元年, Heisei gannen, gannen means "first year") since 8 January
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Japanese Asset Price Bubble
The Japanese asset price bubble
Japanese asset price bubble
(バブル景気, baburu keiki, "bubble condition") was an economic bubble in Japan
Japan
from 1986 to 1991 in which real estate and stock market prices were greatly inflated.[1] In early 1992, this price bubble collapsed. The bubble was characterized by rapid acceleration of asset prices and overheated economic activity, as well as an uncontrolled money supply and credit expansion.[2] More specifically, over-confidence and speculation regarding asset and stock prices had been closely associated with excessive monetary easing policy at the time.[3] By August 1990, the Nikkei stock index had plummeted to half its peak by the time of the fifth monetary tightening by the Bank of Japan (BOJ).[2] By late 1991, asset prices began to fall. Even though asset prices had visibly collapsed by early 1992,[2] the economy's decline continued for more than a decade
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Lost Decade (Japan)
The Lost Decade or the Lost 10 Years (失われた十年, Ushinawareta Jūnen) is a period of economic stagnation in Japan
Japan
following the Japanese asset price bubble's collapse in late 1991 and early 1992. The term originally referred to the years from 1991 to 2000,[1] but recently the decade from 2001 to 2010 is often included,[2] so that the whole period is referred to as the Lost Score or the Lost 20 Years (失われた二十年, Ushinawareta Nijūnen). Broadly impacting the entire Japanese economy, over the period of 1995 to 2007, GDP
GDP
fell from $5.33 to $4.36 trillion in nominal terms,[3] real wages fell around 5%,[4] while the country experienced a stagnant price level.[5] While there is some debate on the extent and measurement of Japan's setbacks,[6][7] the economic effect of the Lost Decade is well established and Japanese policymakers continue to grapple with its consequences
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Naval History Of Japan
The naval history of Japan can be said to begin in early interactions with states on the Asian continent in the early centuries of the 1st millennium, reaching a pre-modern peak of activity during the 16th century, a time of cultural exchange with European powers and extensive trade with the Asian mainland. After over two centuries of relative seclusion under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan's naval technologies were seen to be no match for Western navies when the country was forced by American intervention in 1854 to abandon its maritime restrictions
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Kenmu Restoration
The Kenmu
Kenmu
Restoration (建武の新政, Kenmu
Kenmu
no shinsei) (1333–1336) is the name given to both the three-year period of Japanese history between the
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Nanboku-chō Period
The Nanboku-chō period
Nanboku-chō period
(南北朝時代, Nanboku-chō jidai, "South and North courts period", also known as the Northern and Southern Courts period), spanning from 1336 to 1392, was a period that occurred during the formative years of the Muromachi bakufu
Muromachi bakufu
of Japanese history.The Imperial seats during the Nanboku-chō period
Nanboku-chō period
were in relatively close proximity, but geographically distinct. They were conventionally identified as:Northern capital : Kyoto Southern capital : Yoshino.During this period, there existed a Northern Imperial Court, established by Ashikaga Takauji
Ashikaga Takauji
in Kyoto, and a Southern Imperial Court, established by Emperor Go-Daigo
Emperor Go-Daigo
in Yoshino. Ideologically, the two courts fought for fifty years, with the South giving up to the North in 1392
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Sengoku Period
The Sengoku period
Sengoku period
(戦国時代, Sengoku Jidai, "Age of Warring States"; c. 1467 – c. 1603) is a period in Japanese history marked by social upheaval, political intrigue and near-constant military conflict
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Nanban Trade
The Nanban trade
Nanban trade
(南蛮貿易, Nanban bōeki, "Southern barbarian trade") or the Nanban trade
Nanban trade
period (南蛮貿易時代, Nanban bōeki jidai, "Southern barbarian trade period") in the history of Japan extends from the arrival of the first Europeans – Portuguese explorers, missionaries and merchants – to Japan
Japan
in 1543, to their near-total exclusion from the archipelago in 1614, under the promulgation of the "Sakoku" Seclusion Edicts.[1]First Westerners in Japan, by Hokusai, 1817. Caption: "On August 25, 1543, these foreigners were cast upon the island of Tanegashima, Ōsumi Province", followed by the two names Murashukusha (unknown) and Kirishitamōta (i.e
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