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Megahertz (other)
The HERTZ (symbol: Hz) is the derived unit of frequency in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) and is defined as one cycle per second . It is named for Heinrich Rudolf Hertz
Hertz
, the first person to provide conclusive proof of the existence of electromagnetic waves . Hertz
Hertz
are commonly expressed in multiples : kilohertz (103 Hz, kHz), megahertz (106 Hz, MHz), gigahertz (109 Hz, GHz), and terahertz (1012 Hz, THz). Some of the unit's most common uses are in the description of sine waves and musical tones , particularly those used in radio - and audio-related applications. It is also used to describe the speeds at which computers and other electronics are driven
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General Conference On Weights And Measures
The GENERAL CONFERENCE ON WEIGHTS AND MEASURES (French : _Conférence générale des poids et mesures_ – CGPM) is the senior of the three Inter-governmental organizations established in 1875 under the terms of the Metre Convention (French : _Convention du Mètre_) to represent the interests of member states. The treaty, which also set up two further bodies, the International Committee for Weights and Measures (French : _Comité international des poids et mesures_ – CIPM) and the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (French : _Bureau international des poids et mesures_ – BIPM), was drawn up to coordinate international metrology and to coordinate the development of the metric system . The conference meets in Sèvres (south-west of Paris) every four to six years
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International Electrotechnical Commission
The INTERNATIONAL ELECTROTECHNICAL COMMISSION (IEC; in French : _Commission électrotechnique internationale_) is a non-profit , non-governmental international standards organization that prepares and publishes International Standards for all electrical , electronic and related technologies – collectively known as "electrotechnology ". IEC standards cover a vast range of technologies from power generation, transmission and distribution to home appliances and office equipment, semiconductors, fibre optics, batteries, solar energy , nanotechnology and marine energy as well as many others. The IEC also manages three global conformity assessment systems that certify whether equipment, system or components conform to its International Standards
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Cardiac Cycle
The CARDIAC CYCLE refers to the sequence of mechanical and electrical events that repeats with every heartbeat. It includes the phase of relaxation diastole and the phase of contraction systole . Because the human heart is a four chambered organ, there are atrial systole, atrial diastole, ventricular systole and ventricular diastole. The frequency of the cardiac cycle is described by the heart rate , which is typically expressed as beats per minute . Each cycle of the heart, from the point of view of the ventricles and the status of their valves, involves a minimum of four major stages: Inflow phase, Isovolumetric contraction , outflow phase and Isovolumetric relaxation . The first and the fourth stages, together constitute the "ventricular diastole" stage, involve the movement of blood from the atria into the ventricles . Stages 2 and 3 involve the "ventricular systole" i.e
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Sound
In physics , SOUND is a vibration that typically propagates as an audible wave of pressure , through a transmission medium such as air , water or other materials. In human physiology and psychology , sound is the _reception_ of such waves and their _perception_ by the brain . Humans can hear sound waves with frequencies between about 20 Hz and 20 kHz. Sound above 20 kHz is ultrasound and below 20 Hz is infrasound . Other animals have different hearing ranges
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Longitudinal Wave
LONGITUDINAL WAVES are waves in which the displacement of the medium is in the same direction as, or the opposite direction to, the direction of propagation of the wave. Mechanical longitudinal waves are also called compressional or compression waves, because they produce compression and rarefaction when traveling through a medium, and pressure waves, because they produce increases and decreases in pressure. The other main type of wave is the transverse/transversal wave , in which the displacements of the medium are at right angles to the direction of propagation. Some transverse waves are mechanical, meaning that the wave needs a medium to travel through. Transverse mechanical waves are also called "shear waves". By acronym , "longitudinal waves" and "transverse waves" were occasionally abbreviated by some authors as "L-waves" and "T-waves" respectively for their own convenience
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Electromagnetism
ELECTROMAGNETISM is a branch of physics involving the study of the ELECTROMAGNETIC FORCE, a type of physical interaction that occurs between electrically charged particles. The electromagnetic force usually exhibits electromagnetic fields such as electric fields , magnetic fields , and light and is one of the four fundamental interactions (commonly called forces) in nature . The other three fundamental interactions are the strong interaction , the weak interaction and gravitation . Lightning is an electrostatic discharge that travels between two charged regions. The word _electromagnetism_ is a compound form of two Greek terms, ἤλεκτρον _ēlektron_, "amber ", and μαγνῆτις λίθος _magnētis lithos_, which means "Μagnesian stone", a type of iron ore
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Celsius
The CELSIUS SCALE, also known as the CENTIGRADE SCALE, is an SI scale and unit of measurement for temperature . As an SI derived unit , it is used by most countries in the world. It is named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who developed a similar temperature scale. The DEGREE CELSIUS (symbol: °C) can refer to a specific temperature on the Celsius
Celsius
scale as well as a unit to indicate a temperature interval , a difference between two temperatures or an uncertainty . Before being renamed to honour Anders Celsius
Celsius
in 1948, the unit was called _centigrade_, from the Latin _centum_, which means 100, and _gradus_, which means steps
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Radians
The RADIAN is the standard unit of angular measure, used in many areas of mathematics . The length of an arc of a unit circle is numerically equal to the measurement in radians of the angle that it subtends; one radian is just under 57.3 degrees (expansion at  A072097 ). The unit was formerly an SI supplementary unit , but this category was abolished in 1995 and the radian is now considered an SI derived unit
SI derived unit
. Separately, the SI unit of solid angle measurement is the steradian . The radian is represented by the symbol RAD. An alternative symbol is c, the superscript letter c, for "circular measure", the letter r or a superscript R, but these symbols are infrequently used as it can be easily mistaken for a degree symbol (°) or a radius (r). So, for example, a value of 1.2 radians could be written as 1.2 rad, 1.2 r, 1.2rad, or 1.2c, or 1.2R
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Symbol
A SYMBOL is a mark, sign, or word that indicates, signifies, or is understood as representing an idea, object, or relationship. Symbols allow people to go beyond what is known or seen by creating linkages between otherwise very different concepts and experiences. All communication (and data processing) is achieved through the use of symbols. Symbols take the form of words, sounds, gestures, ideas or visual images and are used to convey other ideas and beliefs. For example, a red octagon may be a symbol for "STOP". On a map, a blue line might represent a river. Numerals are symbols for numbers . Alphabetic letters may be symbols for sounds. Personal names are symbols representing individuals. A red rose may symbolize love and compassion. The variable 'x', in a mathematical equation, may symbolize the position of a particle in space
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Letter Case
LETTER CASE (or just CASE) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger upper case (also uppercase, capital letters, capitals, caps, large letters, or more formally majuscule) and smaller lower case (also lowercase, small letters, or more formally minuscule) in the written representation of certain languages. The writing systems that distinguish between the upper and lower case have two parallel sets of letters, with each letter in one set usually having an equivalent in the other set. Basically, the two case variants are alternative representations of the same letter: they have the same name and pronunciation and will be treated identically when sorting in alphabetical order . Letter case
Letter case
is generally applied in a mixed-case fashion, with both upper- and lower-case letters appearing in a given piece of text. The choice of case is often prescribed by the grammar of a language or by the conventions of a particular discipline
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Title Case
LETTER CASE (or just CASE) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger upper case (also uppercase, capital letters, capitals, caps, large letters, or more formally majuscule) and smaller lower case (also lowercase, small letters, or more formally minuscule) in the written representation of certain languages. The writing systems that distinguish between the upper and lower case have two parallel sets of letters, with each letter in one set usually having an equivalent in the other set. Basically, the two case variants are alternative representations of the same letter: they have the same name and pronunciation and will be treated identically when sorting in alphabetical order . Letter case
Letter case
is generally applied in a mixed-case fashion, with both upper- and lower-case letters appearing in a given piece of text. The choice of case is often prescribed by the grammar of a language or by the conventions of a particular discipline
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Pressure
PRESSURE (symbol: p or P) is the force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area over which that force is distributed. Gauge pressure (also spelled gage pressure) is the pressure relative to the ambient pressure. Various units are used to express pressure. Some of these derive from a unit of force divided by a unit of area; the SI unit
SI unit
of pressure, the pascal (Pa), for example, is one newton per square metre ; similarly, the pound-force per square inch (psi ) is the traditional unit of pressure in the imperial and US customary systems. Pressure may also be expressed in terms of standard atmospheric pressure ; the atmosphere (atm) is equal to this pressure, and the torr is defined as  1⁄760 of this. Manometric units such as the centimetre of water , millimetre of mercury , and inch of mercury are used to express pressures in terms of the height of column of a particular fluid in a manometer
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Pitch (music)
PITCH is a perceptual property of sounds that allows their ordering on a frequency -related scale , or more commonly, pitch is the quality that makes it possible to judge sounds as "higher" and "lower" in the sense associated with musical melodies . Pitch can be determined only in sounds that have a frequency that is clear and stable enough to distinguish from noise . Pitch is a major auditory attribute of musical tones , along with duration , loudness , and timbre . Pitch may be quantified as a frequency , but pitch is not a purely objective physical property; it is a subjective psychoacoustical attribute of sound. Historically, the study of pitch and pitch perception has been a central problem in psychoacoustics, and has been instrumental in forming and testing theories of sound representation, processing, and perception in the auditory system
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