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Medal Of Honor
The Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
is the United States
United States
of America's highest and most prestigious personal military decoration that may be awarded to recognize U.S. military service members who distinguished themselves by acts of valor.[5] The medal is normally awarded by the President of the United States
United States
in the name of the U.S. Congress. Because the medal is presented "in the name of Congress", it is often referred to informally as the "Congressional Medal of Honor". However, the official name of the current award is "Medal of Honor", as it began with the U.S. Army's version.[1][6] Within United States
United States
Code the medal is referred to as the "Medal of Honor",[7] and less frequently as "Congressional Medal of Honor".[8] U.S
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Petty Officer
A petty officer (PO) is a non-commissioned officer in many navies and is given the NATO
NATO
rank denotion OR-6. In many nations, they are typically equal to a corporal or sergeant in comparison to other military branches. Often they may be superior to a seaman, generally the (or one of the) lowest ranks in a navy, and subordinate to a more senior non-commissioned officer, such as a chief petty officer.Contents1 Origin 2 Usage in Navies2.1 Canada 2.2 India 2.3 United Kingdom 2.4 United States 2.5 Non English-speaking countries3 See also 4 ReferencesOrigin[edit] The modern petty officer dates back to the Age of Sail. Petty officers rank between naval officers (both commissioned and warrant) and most enlisted sailors. These were men with some claim to officer rank, sufficient to distinguish them from ordinary ratings, without raising them so high as the sea officers
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U.S. Armed Forces
Gen Joseph Dunford, USMCVice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen Paul J. Selva, USAF Senior Enlisted Advisor
Senior Enlisted Advisor
to the Chairman CSM John W. Troxell, USAManpowerMilitary age 17 with parental consent, 18 for voluntary service
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New York State
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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John André
John André
John André
(2 May 1750 – 2 October 1780) was a British Army
British Army
officer hanged as a spy by the Continental Army
Continental Army
during the American Revolutionary War for assisting Benedict Arnold's attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York
West Point, New York
to the British.Contents1 Early life 2 Intelligence work, capture and execution2.1 Intelligence officer 2.2 Taken into custody 2.3 Trial and execution2.3.1 Eyewitness account3 Aftermath 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Bibliography 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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Badge Of Military Merit
The Badge of Military Merit is considered the first military award of the United States Armed Forces. Although the Fidelity Medallion is older, after being issued to three soldiers for a specific event in 1780 it was never awarded again, so the Badge of Military Merit is often considered the oldest.[1] The Purple Heart is the official successor decoration of the Badge of Military Merit.Contents1 History1.1 First awards2 Recipients 3 Status of original badges 4 Disuse 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Badge of Military Merit was first announced in General George Washington's general orders to the Continental Army issued on August 7, 1782 at the Headquarters in Newburgh
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George Washington
American Revolution Commander in Chief of the Continental ArmyValley Forge Battle of Trenton Mount Vernon
Mount Vernon
Conference 1787 Constitutional ConventionPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst term1788–89 election 1st inaugurationJudiciary Act Whiskey RebellionThanksgiving Presidential title Coinage Act Residence ActDistrict of ColumbiaSecond term1792 election 2nd inauguration Neutrality Act Jay TreatyJudicial appointments Farewell AddressLegacyLegacy Monuments Depictions Slavery Papers Library Bibliographyv t e George Washington
George Washington
(February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American statesman and soldier who served as the first President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1789 to 1797 and was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States
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Continental Army
The Continental Army
Continental Army
was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
by the colonies that became the United States
United States
of America. Established by a resolution of the Congress on June 14, 1775, it was created to coordinate the military efforts of the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
in their revolt against the rule of Great Britain. The Continental Army
Continental Army
was supplemented by local militias and troops that remained under control of the individual states or were otherwise independent
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Certificate Of Merit
Certificate may refer to:Birth certificate Death certificate Gift certificate Certificate of authenticity, a document or seal certifying the authenticity of something Certificate of deposit, or CD, a financial product commonly offered to consumers by banks, thrift institutions and credit unionsComputing[edit]Authorization certificate or attribute certificate Certificate (complexity), a string that certifies the answer to a computation Public key certificate, an electronic document used in cryptographyAcademic qualification[edit]Academic certificate Medical certificate Professional certification, a vocational award A confirmation that a person has passed a Test (assessment) to prove competence Global Assessment Certificate is a university preparation and foundation studies programAustraliaHigher School Certificate (New South Wales), a school qualification in New South Wales, Australia Victorian Certificate of Education, a school qualifica
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Religious
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Mexican-American War
American victoryTreaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Mexican recognition of U.S. sovereignty over Texas
Texas
(among other territories) End of the conflict between Mexico
Mexico
and Republic of TexasTerritorial changes Mexican CessionBelligerents United States California
California
Republic[1] MexicoCommanders and leaders James K. Polk Winfield Scott Zachary Taylor Stephen W. Kearny John Drake Sloat William Jenkins Worth Robert Field Stockton Joseph Lane Franklin Pierce David Conner Matthew C. Perry John C. Frémont Thomas Childs Henry Stanton Burton William B. Ide Edward Dickinson Baker Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José María Flores Mariano G
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Distinguished Service Medal (U.S. Army)
The Distinguished Service Medal (DSM)[2] is a military award of the United States Army
United States Army
that is presented to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the United States military, has distinguished himself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility. The performance must be such as to merit recognition for service that is clearly exceptional. Exceptional performance of normal duty will not alone justify an award of this decoration.[3] Separate Distinguished Service Medals exist for the different branches of the military as well as a fifth version of the medal which is a senior award of the United States Department of Defense
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Seaman
Seaman
Seaman
is a naval rank and is either the lowest or one of the lowest ranks in most navies around the world. In the Commonwealth, it is the lowest rank in the navy. The next rank up is able seaman, followed by leading seaman, which is followed by the petty officer ranks. In the United States, it means the lowest three enlisted rates of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, followed by the higher petty officer ranks. The equivalent of the seaman is the matelot[1] in French-speaking countries, and Matrose in German-speaking countries. The term "seaman" is also a general-purpose for a man or a woman who works anywhere on board a modern ship, including in the engine spaces, which is the very opposite of sailing. This is untrue in the US Navy where a sailor might be a seaman but not all US Navy sailors are a 'Seaman' as they might be an Airman, Fireman, Constructionman, or Hospital Corpsman
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Edward D. Townsend
Edward Davis Townsend (August 22, 1817 – May 10, 1893) was Adjutant General of the United States Army from 1869 to 1880. The son of David S. & Eliza (Gerry) Townsend and grandson of Vice President Elbridge Gerry, Townsend was educated at Boston's Latin School before graduating from the United States Military Academy in 1837. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Second U. S. Artillery and served as that regiment's adjutant and participating in the Second Seminole War and the relocation of the Cherokee Nation. In 1846 he was transferred to the Adjutant General's Corps and assigned to duty in Washington, D.C. He served on the Pacific coast from 1851 to 1856, after which he returned to Washington for the remainder of his career. In February 1869 he was promoted to brigadier general and became adjutant general. Townsend retired in 1880
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