HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Maya (illusion)
Maya (Devanagari: माया, IAST: māyā), literally "illusion" or "magic",[1][2] has multiple meanings in Indian philosophies depending on the context. In ancient Vedic literature, Māyā literally implies extraordinary power and wisdom.[3] In later Vedic texts and modern literature dedicated to Indian traditions, Māyā connotes a "magic show, an illusion where things appear to be present but are not what they seem".[2][4] Māyā is also a spiritual concept connoting "that which exists, but is constantly changing and thus is spiritually unreal", and the "power or the principle that conceals the true character of spiritual reality".[5][6] In Buddhism, Maya is the name of Gautama Buddha's mother.[7] In Hinduism, Maya is also an epithet for goddess,[8] and the name of a manifestation of Lakshmi, the goddess of "wealth, prosperity and love"
[...More...]

"Maya (illusion)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jan Gonda
Jan Gonda, (14 April 1905 – 28 July 1991) was a celebrated Dutch Indologist and the first Utrecht professor of Sanskrit.[1] He was born in Gouda in the Netherlands
Netherlands
and died in Utrecht.[2] He studied with Willem Caland
Willem Caland
at Rijksuniversiteit, Utrecht (since 1990 Universiteit Utrecht) and from 1932 held positions at Utrecht and Leiden. He held the positions of Chair of Sanskrit succeeding Caland from 1929, as well as of Indology from 1932.[1] He published scholarly articles on Indian Sanskrit and Indonesian Javanese texts for sixty years.[1] In 1952, he published his monumental work on Sanskrit in Indonesia.[1] His contributions to philology and Vedic literature has been oft cited.[1] Gonda is recognized as one of the twentieth century's leading scholars of Asian language, literature and religion, particularly on texts and topics related to Hinduism and Buddhism
[...More...]

"Jan Gonda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Avesta
The Avesta
Avesta
/əˈvɛstə/ is the primary collection of religious texts of Zoroastrianism, composed in the otherwise unrecorded Avestan language.[1] The Avesta
Avesta
texts fall into several different categories, arranged either by dialect, or by usage. The principal text in the liturgical group is the Yasna, which takes its name from the Yasna
Yasna
ceremony, Zoroastrianism's primary act of worship, and at which the Yasna
Yasna
text is recited
[...More...]

"Avesta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Arthur Bowen Davies
Arthur Bowen Davies (September 26, 1862 – October 24, 1928) was an avant-garde American artist and influential advocate of modern art in the United States c. 1910–1928.Contents1 Biography 2 Career 3 Style 4 Selected works 5 Pastel drawings 6 Public collections 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksBiography[edit] Davies was born in Utica, New York,[2] the son of David and Phoebe Davies.[3] He was keenly interested in drawing when he was young and, at fifteen, attended a large touring exhibition in his hometown of American landscape art, featuring works by George Inness and members of the Hudson River School. The show had a profound effect on him. He was especially impressed by Inness's tonalist landscapes.[4] After his family relocated to Chicago, Davies studied at the Chicago Academy of Design from 1879 to 1882 and briefly attended the Art Institute of Chicago, before moving to New York City, where he studied at the Art Students League
[...More...]

"Arthur Bowen Davies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Devanagari
Devanagari
Devanagari
(/ˌdeɪvəˈnɑːɡəri/ DAY-və-NAH-gə-ree; देवनागरी, IAST: Devanāgarī, a compound of "deva" दे
and "nāgarī" नागरी; Hindi
Hindi
pronunciation: [d̪eːʋˈnaːɡri]), also called Nagari (Nāgarī, नागरी),[5] is an abugida (alphasyllabary) used in India
India
and Nepal
[...More...]

"Devanagari" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

IAST
The International Alphabet of Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Transliteration
Transliteration
(I.A.S.T.) is a transliteration scheme that allows the lossless romanization of Indic scripts as employed by Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and related Indic languages. It is based on a scheme that emerged during the nineteenth century from suggestions by Charles Trevelyan, William Jones, Monier Monier-Williams and other scholars, and formalised by the Transliteration
Transliteration
Committee of the Geneva Oriental Congress, in September 1894.[1] IAST makes it possible for the reader to read the Indic text unambiguously, exactly as if it were in the original Indic script
[...More...]

"IAST" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

God In Hinduism
The concept of God
God
in Hinduism
Hinduism
varies in its diverse traditions.[1][2][3] Hinduism
Hinduism
spans a wide range of beliefs such as henotheism, monotheism, polytheism, panentheism, pantheism, pandeism, monism, atheism and nontheism.[1][4][5] Forms of theism find mention in the Bhagavad Gita
[...More...]

"God In Hinduism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vedic Sanskrit
Vedic Sanskrit
Sanskrit
or Aryam (Devanagari: आर्यम् IAST: āryam, "noble") is an Indo-European language, more specifically one branch of the Indo-Iranian group. It is the ancient language of the Vedas
Vedas
of Hinduism, texts compiled over the period of the mid-2nd to mid-1st millennium BCE.[1] It was orally preserved, predating the advent of Brahmi script
Brahmi script
by several centuries
[...More...]

"Vedic Sanskrit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maya (mother Of The Buddha)
Queen Māyā of Sakya (Māyādevī มายาเทวี) was the birth mother of Gautama Buddha, the sage on whose teachings Buddhism was founded. She was sister of Mahāpajāpatī Gotamī มหาปชาปตี โคตมี, the first Buddhist nun ordained by the Buddha.[1][2] In Buddhist tradition Maya died soon after the birth of Buddha, generally said to be seven days afterwards, and came to life again in a Hindu-Buddhist heaven, a pattern that is said to be followed in the births of all Buddhas.[1] Thus Maya did not raise her son who was instead raised by his maternal aunt Mahapajapati Gotami.[1] Maya would, however, on occasion descend from Heaven to give advice to her son.[1] Māyā means "illusion" in Sanskrit. Māyā is also called Mahāmāyā ("Great Māyā") and Māyādevī ("Queen Māyā"). In Tibetan she is called Gyutrulma and in Japanese is known as Maya-bunin (摩耶夫人)
[...More...]

"Maya (mother Of The Buddha)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kama
Kama
Kama
(/ˈkɑːmə/; Sanskrit, Pali; Devanagari: काम, IAST: kāma) means wish, desire or longing in Hindu literature.[3] Kama often connotes sexual desire and longing in contemporary literature, but the concept more broadly refers to any desire, wish, passion, longing, pleasure of the senses, the aesthetic enjoyment of life, affection, or love, with or without sexual connotations.[4][5] Kama
[...More...]

"Kama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ārjava
Ārjava (Sanskrit: आर्जव) literally means sincerity, straightness and non-hypocrisy.[1][2] It is one of the ten Yamas
Yamas
in ancient Hindu and Jaina texts.[3]Contents1 Definition 2 Literature 3 See also 4 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Ārjava means straightness, sincerity and harmony in one’s thought, words and actions towards oneself and towards others.[1] Kane translates arjava as straightforwardness.[4] It is explained in ancient Indian texts as “self-restraint from hypocrisy", and "the absence of hypocrisy”. It is included as one of several ethical virtuous restraints in an individual's path to spirituality
[...More...]

"Ārjava" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asteya
Asteya
Asteya
is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term for "non-stealing". It is a virtue in Jainism
Jainism
and Hinduism
[...More...]

"Asteya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Monier Williams
Sir Monier Monier-Williams (né Monier Williams), KCIE (/ˈmɒnjər/; 12 November 1819 – 11 April 1899) was the second Boden Professor of Sanskrit at Oxford University, England. He studied, documented and taught Asian languages, especially Sanskrit, Persian and Hindustani.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Writings and foundations 4 Honours 5 Published works5.1 Translations 5.2 Original works6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Monier Williams was born in Bombay, the son of Colonel Monier Williams, surveyor-general in the Bombay presidency. His surname was "Williams" until 1887 when he added his Christian name to his surname to create the hyphenated "Monier-Williams". In 1822 he was sent to England to be educated at private schools at Hove, Chelsea and Finchley. He was educated at King's College School, Balliol College, Oxford (1838–40), the East India Company College (1840–41) and University College, Oxford (1841–44)
[...More...]

"Monier Williams" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Adrian Snodgrass
Adrian Snodgrass is an authority in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art. He has developed important theories in the area of hermeneutical philosophy and its application to knowledge production and cross-cultural understanding. Snodgrass is co-editor of the journal Architectural Theory Review and Editor of Architectural Theory. He is an Honorary Life Member of The Asian Arts Society of Australia (TAASA); President of the Australasian Association for Buddhist Studies (AABS); Research Associate in the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning in The University of Sydney; Senior Research Fellow in the School of Languages and Cultures at the same university; and Adjunct Professor in the Centre for Cultural Research at the University of Western Sydney
[...More...]

"Adrian Snodgrass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dharma
Dharma
Dharma
(/ˈdɑːrmə/;[8] Sanskrit: धर्म, translit. dharma, pronounced [dʱəɾmə] ( listen); Pali: धम्म, translit. dhamma, translit
[...More...]

"Dharma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sannyasa
Sannyasa
Sannyasa
(saṃnyāsa) is the life stage of renunciation within the Hindu
Hindu
philosophy of four age-based life stages known as ashramas, with the first three being
[...More...]

"Sannyasa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.