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May Fourth Movement
The May Fourth Movement
May Fourth Movement
(Chinese: 五四运动; pinyin: Wǔsì Yùndòng) was an anti-imperialist, cultural, and political movement growing out of student participants in Beijing on 4 May 1919, protesting against the Chinese government's weak response to the Treaty of Versailles, especially allowing Japan to receive territories in Shandong
Shandong
which had been surrendered by Germany after the Siege of Tsingtao. These demonstrations sparked national protests and marked the upsurge of Chinese nationalism, a shift towards political mobilization and away from cultural activities, and a move towards a populist base rather than intellectual elites
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WUSI (other)
Disambiguation usually refers to word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. Disambiguation may also refer to:Sentence boundary disambiguation, the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end Syntactic disambiguation, the problem of resolving syntactic ambiguity Memory disambiguation, a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMusic[edit]Ø (Disambiguation), a 2010 album by Underoath Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album), a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSee also[edit]Ambiguity, an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolvedThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Disambiguation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
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Eastern Wu
Jianye (229–265, 266–280)Languages ChineseReligion Taoism, Confucianism, Chinese folk religionGovernment MonarchyKing (222–229) Emperor (229–280) •  222–252 Sun Quan •  252–258 Sun Liang •  258–264 Sun Xiu •  264–280 Sun HaoHistorical era Three Kingdoms •  Independence from Cao Wei 222 •  Sun Quan
Sun Quan
declaring himself Emperor 229 •  Conquest of Wu by Jin 31 May 280[1]Population •  238[2] est. 2,567,00
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Jin Dynasty (265–420)
The Jin dynasty or the Jin Empire
Empire
(/dʒɪn/;[2] Chinese: 晉朝; pinyin: Jìn Cháo, sometimes distinguished as the Sima Jin or Liang Jin) was a Chinese dynasty traditionally dated from AD 265 to 420. It was founded by Sima Yan, son of Sima Zhao who was made Prince of Jin and posthumously declared the founder of the dynasty. It followed the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period (220-280 AD), which ended with the conquest of Eastern Wu
Eastern Wu
by the Jin. There are two main divisions in the history of the dynasty
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Sixteen Kingdoms
The Sixteen Kingdoms, less commonly the Sixteen States, was a chaotic period in Chinese history from 304 CE to 439 CE when the political order of northern China fractured into a series of short-lived sovereign states, most of which were founded by the "Five Barbarians" who had settled in northern China during the preceding centuries and participated in the overthrow of the Western Jin dynasty
Western Jin dynasty
in the early 4th century. The period ended with the unification of northern China by the Northern Wei
Northern Wei
in the early 5th century. The term "Sixteen Kingdoms" was first used by the 6th-century historian Cui Hong in the Spring and Autumn Annals of the Sixteen Kingdoms and refers to the five Liangs (Former, Later, Northern, Southern and Western), four Yans (Former, Later, Northern, and Southern), three Qins (Former, Later and Western), two Zhaos (Former and Later), Cheng Han
Cheng Han
and Xia
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Northern And Southern Dynasties
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Sui Dynasty
The Sui Dynasty (/swiː/;[3] Chinese: 隋朝; pinyin: Suí cháo) was a short-lived imperial dynasty of China
China
of pivotal significance. The Sui unified the Northern and Southern dynasties
Northern and Southern dynasties
and reinstalled the rule of ethnic Han Chinese
Han Chinese
in the entirety of China
China
proper, along with sinicization of former nomadic ethnic minorities (the Five Barbarians) within its territory
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Tang Dynasty
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
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Zhou Dynasty (690–705)
The Zhou dynasty (/dʒoʊ/;[1] Chinese: 周), also called the Second Zhou dynasty or Restored Zhou dynasty, was a Chinese dynasty established by Wu Zetian
Wu Zetian
in 690, when she proclaimed herself huangdi (emperor). The dynasty interrupted the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
until its abolition in 705, when Wu Zetian
Wu Zetian
abdicated and the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
was restored. Its sole ruler was Wu Zhao, who took the name Wu Zetian
Wu Zetian
upon her coronation. Wu named her dynasty after the ancient Zhou Dynasty, from whom she believed herself to be descended. History[edit] The dynasty's capital was Shendu[2] (神都 divine capital, present-day Luoyang)
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Five Dynasties And Ten Kingdoms Period
The Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period
Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period
was an era of political upheaval in 10th-century Imperial China. Five states quickly succeeded one another in the Central Plain, and more than a dozen concurrent states were established elsewhere, mainly in South China. It was the last prolonged period of multiple political division in Chinese history.[1] Traditionally, the era started with the fall of the Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
in 907 AD and ended with the founding of the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
in 960. Many states had been de facto independent kingdoms long before 907. After the Tang had collapsed, the kings who controlled the Central plain crowned themselves as emperor. War between kingdoms occurred frequently to gain control of the central plain for legitimacy and then over the rest of China
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Liao Dynasty
The Liao dynasty
Liao dynasty
(/ljaʊ/;[3] Khitan: Mos Jælud; simplified Chinese: 辽朝; traditional Chinese: 遼朝; pinyin: Liáo cháo),[4] also known as the Liao Empire, officially the Great Liao (simplified Chinese: 大辽; traditional Chinese: 大遼; pinyin: Dà Liáo), or the Khitan Empire (Khitan: Mos diau-d kitai huldʒi gur ),[5], was an empire in East Asia
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Western Xia
The Western Xia
Western Xia
(/ʃjɑː/;[2] Chinese: 西夏; pinyin: Xī Xià; Wade–Giles: Hsi1 Hsia4), also known as the Xi Xia Empire, to the Mongols
Mongols
as the Tangut Empire and to the Tangut people
Tangut people
themselves and to the Tibetans as Mi-nyak,[3] was an empire which existed from 1038 to 1227 in what are now the northwestern Chinese provinces of Ningxia, Gansu, eastern Qinghai, northern Shaanxi, northeastern Xinjiang, southwest Inner Mongolia, and southernmost Outer Mongolia, measuring about 800,000 square kilometres (310,000 square miles).[4][5][6] The early capital was established at Ningxia
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Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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Jin Dynasty (1115–1234)
The Jin dynasty, officially known as the Great Jin (/dʒɪn/),[2] lasted from 1115 to 1234 as one of the last dynasties in Chinese history to predate the Mongol invasion of China. Its name is sometimes written as Kin, Jurchen Jin or Jinn in English to differentiate it from an earlier Jìn dynasty of China
China
whose name is identical when transcribed without tone marker diacritics in the Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
system for Standard Chinese.[3] It is also sometimes called the "Jurchen dynasty" or the "Jurchen Jin", because its founding Emperor Taizu of Jin (reign 1115–1123) was of Wanyan
Wanyan
Jurchen descent. The Jin emerged from Taizu's rebellion against the Liao dynasty (907–1125), which held sway over northern China
China
until the nascent Jin drove the Liao to the Western Regions, where they became known as the Western Liao
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Yuan Dynasty
The Yuan dynasty
Yuan dynasty
(/juːˈɑːn/;[4] Chinese: 元朝; pinyin: Yuán Cháo), officially the Great Yuan[5] (Chinese: 大元; pinyin: Dà Yuán; Yehe Yuan Ulus[b]), was the empire or ruling dynasty of China established by Kublai Khan, leader of the Mongolian Borjigin
Borjigin
clan. It followed the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
and was succeeded by the Ming dynasty. Although the Mongols
Mongols
had ruled territories including modern-day North China
China
for decades, it was not until 1271 that Kublai Khan
Kublai Khan
officially proclaimed the dynasty in the traditional Chinese style,[6] and the conquest was not complete until 1279
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