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Maxxum
The Minolta
Minolta
A-mount camera system was a line of photographic equipment from Minolta. The system used a lens mount called A-mount, with a flange focal distance 44.50 mm. The new mount was larger than the older SR-mount
SR-mount
making old manual lenses incompatible with the new system. The mount is now used by Sony, who bought the SLR camera division from Konica
Konica
Minolta, Konica
Konica
and Minolta
Minolta
having merged a few years before. The Minolta
Minolta
A-mount system was at first marketed as Maxxum
Maxxum
in North America and α (Alpha) in Japan and the rest of Asia. In Europe early Minolta
Minolta
A-mount cameras were initially identified by a 4 digit number followed by AF
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Sony SAL-100M28
Sony released the following SAL (for: Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
Lens) lenses for Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
cameras since 2006. 18 of the original designs are based on Minolta A-mount
Minolta A-mount
technology it acquired from Konica Minolta. Of those, most lenses are optically, mechanically and electrically identical to their Minolta predecessors and differ only in their outer appearance. However, three of them have also seen subtle changes in the optics and electro-mechanics (as indicated). Some of the new lenses introduced into the line have been developed in cooperation with Carl Zeiss (as indicated). All Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
lenses are fully compatible with Konica Minolta A-mount cameras
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Fisheye Lens
A fisheye lens is an ultra wide-angle lens that produces strong visual distortion intended to create a wide panoramic or hemispherical image.[1][2] Fisheye lenses achieve extremely wide angles of view. Instead of producing images with straight lines of perspective (rectilinear images), fisheye lenses use a special mapping (for example: equisolid angle), which gives images a characteristic convex non-rectilinear appearance. The term fisheye was coined in 1906 by American physicist and inventor Robert W. Wood
Robert W. Wood
based on how a fish would see an ultrawide hemispherical view from beneath the water (a phenomenon known as Snell's window).[2][3] Their first practical use was in the 1920s for use in meteorology[4][5] to study cloud formation giving them the name "whole-sky lenses"
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Transclusion
In computer science, transclusion is the inclusion of part or all of an electronic document into one or more other documents by hypertext reference. Transclusion is usually performed when the referencing document is displayed, and is normally automatic and transparent to the end user.[1] The result of transclusion is a single integrated document made of parts assembled on the fly from separate sources, possibly stored on different computers in disparate places. Transclusion facilitates modular design: a resource is stored once and distributed for reuse in multiple documents. Updates or corrections to a resource are then reflected in any referencing documents
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Sony SAL-16F28
Sony released the following SAL (for: Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
Lens) lenses for Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
cameras since 2006. 18 of the original designs are based on Minolta A-mount
Minolta A-mount
technology it acquired from Konica Minolta. Of those, most lenses are optically, mechanically and electrically identical to their Minolta predecessors and differ only in their outer appearance. However, three of them have also seen subtle changes in the optics and electro-mechanics (as indicated). Some of the new lenses introduced into the line have been developed in cooperation with Carl Zeiss (as indicated). All Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
lenses are fully compatible with Konica Minolta A-mount cameras
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Flange Focal Distance
For an interchangeable lens camera, the flange focal distance (FFD) (also known as the flange-to-film distance, flange focal depth, flange back distance (FBD), flange focal length (FFL), or register, depending on the usage and source) of a lens mount system is the distance from the mounting flange (the metal ring on the camera and the rear of the lens) to the film plane. This value is different for different camera systems. The range of this distance, which will render an image clearly in focus within all focal lengths, is usually measured in hundredths of millimeters and is known as the depth of focus (not to be confused with the similarly named depth of field). This distance influences whether a lens from one system can be mounted with an adaptor to a camera body of another system
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Sony
Sony
Sony
Corporation (ソニー株式会社, Sonī Kabushiki Kaisha, /ˈsoʊni/ SOH-nee, stylized as SONY) is a Japanese multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Kōnan, Minato, Tokyo.[9][1] Its diversified business includes consumer and professional electronics, gaming, entertainment and financial services.[10] The company is one of the leading manufacturers of electronic products for the consumer and professional markets.[11] Sony
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Sony SAL-20F28
Sony released the following SAL (for: Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
Lens) lenses for Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
cameras since 2006. 18 of the original designs are based on Minolta A-mount
Minolta A-mount
technology it acquired from Konica Minolta. Of those, most lenses are optically, mechanically and electrically identical to their Minolta predecessors and differ only in their outer appearance. However, three of them have also seen subtle changes in the optics and electro-mechanics (as indicated). Some of the new lenses introduced into the line have been developed in cooperation with Carl Zeiss (as indicated). All Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
lenses are fully compatible with Konica Minolta A-mount cameras
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Sony SAL-50M28
Sony released the following SAL (for: Sony A-mount Lens) lenses for Sony A-mount cameras since 2006. 18 of the original designs are based on Minolta A-mount technology it acquired from Konica Minolta. Of those, most lenses are optically, mechanically and electrically identical to their Minolta predecessors and differ only in their outer appearance. However, three of them have also seen subtle changes in the optics and electro-mechanics (as indicated). Some of the new lenses introduced into the line have been developed in cooperation with Carl Zeiss (as indicated). All Sony A-mount lenses are fully compatible with Konica Minolta A-mount cameras. All full-frame Sony A-mount lenses are also compatible with Minolta A-mount cameras, with the exception that SSM and SAM lenses can only be used with manual focusing (with electronic focus assist) on camera bodies not supporting SSM already
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Phosphorescent Paint
Luminous paint
Luminous paint
or luminescent paint is paint that exhibits luminescence. In other words, it gives off visible light through fluorescence, phosphorescence, or radioluminescence.Contents1 Fluorescent paint 2 Phosphorescent paint 3 Radioluminescent
Radioluminescent
paint3.1 Radium 3.2 Promethium 3.3 Tritium4 See also 5 ReferencesFluorescent paint[edit] Further information: Blacklight paint Fluorescent paints offer a wide range of pigments and chroma which also 'glow' when exposed to the long-wave "ultraviolet" frequencies (UV)
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Titanium
Titanium
Titanium
is a chemical element with symbol Ti and atomic number 22. It is a lustrous transition metal with a silver color, low density, and high strength. Titanium
Titanium
is resistant to corrosion in sea water, aqua regia, and chlorine. Titanium
Titanium
was discovered in Cornwall, Great Britain, by William Gregor in 1791, and was named by Martin Heinrich Klaproth
Martin Heinrich Klaproth
after the Titans of Greek mythology. The element occurs within a number of mineral deposits, principally rutile and ilmenite, which are widely distributed in the Earth's crust
Earth's crust
and lithosphere, and it is found in almost all living things, water bodies, rocks, and soils.[5] The metal is extracted from its principal mineral ores by the Kroll[6] and Hunter processes
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Sony SAL-50F14
Sony released the following SAL (for: Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
Lens) lenses for Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
cameras since 2006. 18 of the original designs are based on Minolta A-mount
Minolta A-mount
technology it acquired from Konica Minolta. Of those, most lenses are optically, mechanically and electrically identical to their Minolta predecessors and differ only in their outer appearance. However, three of them have also seen subtle changes in the optics and electro-mechanics (as indicated). Some of the new lenses introduced into the line have been developed in cooperation with Carl Zeiss (as indicated). All Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
lenses are fully compatible with Konica Minolta A-mount cameras
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Spectroradiometer
Spectroradiometers are devices designed to measure the spectral power distribution of a source. From the spectral power distribution, the radiometric, photometric, and colorimetric quantities of light can be determined in order to measure, characterize, and calibrate light sources for various applications. Spectroradiometers typically take measurements of spectral irradiance and spectral radiance. This spectral data can be used to calculate CIE tristimulus values through mathematical integration. CIE chromaticity coordinates and luminosity can then be calculated, providing a complete description of the source’s color, including chromaticity, spectral power, illuminance, and luminance.[1] Spectroradiometers are stand-alone systems that work independently without the need to be connected to a PC
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DX Coding
DX (Digital indeX) encoding is an ANSI and I3A
I3A
standard, originally introduced by Kodak
Kodak
in March 1983, for marking 135 and APS photographic film and film cartridges. It consists of several parts, a latent image DX film edge barcode on the film below the sprocket holes, a code on the cartridge used by automatic cameras, and a barcode on the cartridge read by photo-finishing machines.Contents1 History 2 DX cartridge barcode 3 DX film edge barcode 4 DX Camera Auto Sensing4.1 Electrical contacts5 Reading DX codes 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In order to simplify the handling of 35 mm film in 135 format Kodak
Kodak
introduced the DX encoding
DX encoding
method on 3
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Sony SAL-28F28
Sony released the following SAL (for: Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
Lens) lenses for Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
cameras since 2006. 18 of the original designs are based on Minolta A-mount
Minolta A-mount
technology it acquired from Konica Minolta. Of those, most lenses are optically, mechanically and electrically identical to their Minolta predecessors and differ only in their outer appearance. However, three of them have also seen subtle changes in the optics and electro-mechanics (as indicated). Some of the new lenses introduced into the line have been developed in cooperation with Carl Zeiss (as indicated). All Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
lenses are fully compatible with Konica Minolta A-mount cameras
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Sony SAL-35F14G
Sony released the following SAL (for: Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
Lens) lenses for Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
cameras since 2006. 18 of the original designs are based on Minolta A-mount
Minolta A-mount
technology it acquired from Konica Minolta. Of those, most lenses are optically, mechanically and electrically identical to their Minolta predecessors and differ only in their outer appearance. However, three of them have also seen subtle changes in the optics and electro-mechanics (as indicated). Some of the new lenses introduced into the line have been developed in cooperation with Carl Zeiss (as indicated). All Sony A-mount
Sony A-mount
lenses are fully compatible with Konica Minolta A-mount cameras
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