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Maxwell Lord
Maxwell Lord
Maxwell Lord
IV, or simply Max Lord, is a fictional supervillain appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character first appeared in Justice League
Justice League
#1 (May 1987) and was created by Keith Giffen, J. M. DeMatteis, and Kevin Maguire. Depicted as a shrewd and powerful businessman, Maxwell Lord
Maxwell Lord
was influential in the formation of the Justice League
Justice League
International in the DC Universe. Maxwell Lord
Maxwell Lord
appeared in an episode of Smallville
Smallville
played by Gil Bellows. He was also in the first season of the television series Supergirl played by Peter Facinelli
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DC Comics
DC Comics, Inc. is an American comic book
American comic book
publisher. It is the publishing unit of DC Entertainment,[3][4] a subsidiary of Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc., a division of Time Warner. DC Comics
DC Comics
is one of the largest and oldest American comic book
American comic book
companies, and produces material featuring numerous well-known heroic characters including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, The Flash, The Spectre, The Atom, Aquaman, Hawkman, Martian Manhunter, Supergirl, Nightwing, Green Arrow, Static, Starfire, Black Canary, Zatanna
Zatanna
and Cyborg
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Metahumans
In DC Comics' DC Universe, a metahuman is a superhuman.[citation needed] The term is roughly synonymous with both mutant and mutate in the Marvel Universe
Marvel Universe
and posthuman in the Wildstorm and Ultimate Marvel Universes. In DC Comics, the term is used loosely in most instances to refer to any human-like being with extranormal powers and abilities, be they cosmic, mutant, science, mystic, skill or tech in nature. A significant portion of these are normal human beings born with a genetic variant called the "metagene",[1] which causes them to gain powers and abilities during freak accidents or times of intense psychological distress. The term as a referent to superheroes began in 1986 by author George R. R
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Alexander Luthor, Jr.
Alexander Luthor Jr.
Alexander Luthor Jr.
is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.Contents1 Publication history 2 Fictional character biography2.1 Crisis on Infinite Earths 2.2 Escape from "Heaven" 2.3 Infinite Crisis2.3.1 Countdown 2.3.2 "I'm you
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Phil Jimenez
Phil Jimenez
Phil Jimenez
(born July 12, 1970)[1] is an American comics artist and writer, known for his work as writer/artist on Wonder Woman
Wonder Woman
from 2000 to 2003, as one of the five pencilers of the 2005–2006 miniseries Infinite Crisis, and his collaborations with writer Grant Morrison
Grant Morrison
on New X-Men
X-Men
and The Invisibles.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Other work 4 Awards and recognition 5 Personal life 6 Bibliography6.1 DC Comics 6.2 Vertigo 6.3 WildStorm 6.4 Marvel Comics7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Phil Jimenez
Phil Jimenez
was born and raised in Los Angeles and later Orange County, California. He moved to New York City to attend college at the School of Visual Arts,[3][4] where he majored in cartooning
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Identity Crisis (DC Comics)
Identity Crisis is a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics
DC Comics
from June to December in 2004
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Brad Meltzer
Brad Meltzer (born April 1, 1970) is an American political thriller novelist, non-fiction writer, TV show creator and comic book author.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Novels 4 Non-fiction 5 Comic books 6 Television 7 Personal life 8 Bibliography8.1 Novels 8.2 Children's books 8.3 Non-fiction 8.4 Comic books9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Brad Meltzer was born on April 1, 1970. He grew up in Brooklyn, New York, and then moved to South Florida, where he graduated from North Miami Beach Senior High School in 1988. He earned a degree from the University of Michigan, the first in his immediate family to attend a four-year college
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Mongul
Pre-CrisisSuperhuman Strength Superhuman Speed Superhuman Stamina Superhuman Agility Near invulnerability Teleportation Limited telepathy Limited Telekinesis Energy Projection Access to vast alien technologyPost-Crisis (Senior)Superhuman Strength Superhuman Speed Superhuman Stamina Superhuman Agility Superhuman Durability Limited Energy Projection(Junior)Superhuman Strength Superhuman Speed Superhuman Stamina Superhuman Durability Superhuman Agility Limited Energy Projection Qwardian power rings Anatomical Liberation Mongul
Mongul
is the name of two fictional characters that appear in comic books published by DC Comics. Writer Len Wein
Len Wein
and artist Jim Starlin created the first version of the character, who debuted in DC Comics Presents #27 (Nov. 1980). Writer Peter J. Tomasi
Peter J. Tomasi
and artist Scot Eaton created the second version, who first appeared in Showcase '95 #8 (Sept
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New Genesis
New Genesis
New Genesis
is a fictional planet appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The planet is in a parallel dimension adjacent to the main DC Universe. This planet, along with Apokolips, is speculated to be near the constellation Orion
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Brain Tumor
A brain tumor occurs when abnormal cells form within the brain.[2] There are two main types of tumors: malignant or cancerous tumors and benign tumors.[2] Cancerous
Cancerous
tumors can be divided into primary tumors that start within the brain, and secondary tumors that have spread from somewhere else, known as brain metastasis tumors.[1] All types of brain tumors may produce symptoms that vary depending on the part of the brain involved.[2] These symptoms may include headaches, seizures, problem with vision, vomiting, and mental changes.[1][7][2] The headache is classically worse in the morning and goes away with vomiting.[2] More specific problems may includ
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Fictional Crossover
A crossover is the placement of two or more otherwise discrete fictional characters, settings, or universes into the context of a single story. They can arise from legal agreements between the relevant copyright holders, unauthorized efforts by fans or common corporate ownership.Contents1 Official crossovers1.1 Comics 1.2 Animation 1.3 Video games 1.4 Film 1.5 Literature 1.6 Public domain 1.7 Television series1.7.1 Between established shows1.7.1.1 Between related shows 1.7.1.2 Narrative rationales 1.7.1.3 In children's television1.7.2 Special
Special
usages1.7.2.1 Promotional cameos1.7.3 Spin-offs1.7.3.1 Parodic crossovers 1.7.3.2 Retroactive crossovers2 Unofficial crossovers 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOfficial crossovers[edit] Crossovers often occur in an official capacity in order for the intellectual property rights holders to reap the financial reward of combining two or more popular, established properties
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First Appearance
In American comic books and other stories with a long history, first appearance refers to the first issue to feature a fictional character. These issues are often highly valued by collectors due to their rarity and iconic status.Contents1 Monetary value of first appearance issues 2 Reader interest in first appearances 3 Ambiguity of first appearance 4 First appearances of popular heroes, villains and teams 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesMonetary value of first appearance issues[edit] First appearances of popular characters are among the most valuable comic books in existence
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Infinite Crisis
"Infinite Crisis" is a 2005–2006 comic book storyline published by DC Comics, consisting of an eponymous, seven-issue comic book limited series written by Geoff Johns
Geoff Johns
and illustrated by Phil Jimenez, George Pérez, Ivan Reis, and Jerry Ordway, and a number of tie-in books. The main miniseries debuted in October 2005, and each issue was released with two variant covers: one by Pérez, and one by Jim Lee
Jim Lee
and Sandra Hope. The series storyline was a sequel to DC's 1985 limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, which "rebooted" much of the DC continuity in an effort to fix 50 years of contradictory character history. It revisited characters and concepts from that earlier Crisis, including the existence of DC's Multiverse. Some of the characters featured were alternate versions of comic icons such as an alternate Superman
Superman
named Kal-L, who came from a parallel universe called Earth-Two
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Retcon
Retroactive continuity, or retcon for short,[1][2] is a literary device in which established facts in a fictional work are adjusted, ignored, or contradicted by a subsequently published work which breaks continuity with the former.[3]Contents1 Overview 2 Etymology 3 Types3.1 Addition 3.2 Alteration 3.3 Subtraction 3.4 Temporal compression4 Related concepts 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] There are various motivations for applying retroactive continuity, including:To accommodate desired aspects of sequels or derivative works which would otherwise be ruled out; To correct and overcome errors or problems identified in the prior work since its publication; To change how the prior work should be interpreted; To match reality, when assumptions or projections of the future are later proven wrong.[Note 1]Retcons are used by authors to increase their creative freedom, on the assumption that the changes are unimporta
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Hegemony
Hegemony
Hegemony
(UK: /hɪˈɡɛməni, hɪˈdʒɛməni/, US: /hɪˈdʒɛməni/ ( pronunciation (help·info)) or /ˈhɛdʒəˌmoʊni/) is the political, economic, or military predominance or control of one state over others.[1][2][3][4] In ancient Greece (8th century BC – 6th century AD), hegemony denoted the politico–military dominance of a city-state over other city-states.[5] The dominant state is known as the hegemon.[6] In the 19th century, hegemony came to denote the "Social or cultural predominance or ascendancy; predominance by one group within a society or milieu"
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Metron (comics)
Metron is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.Contents1 Publication history 2 Fictional character biography2.1 The New 523 Powers and abilities 4 Other versions 5 In other media5.1 Television 5.2 Film 5.3 Toys6 References 7 External linksPublication history[edit] Metron first appeared in New Gods #1 (February–March 1971) and was created by Jack Kirby for his Fourth World series in DC Comics. Metron was based on actor Leonard Nimoy's portrayal of the Star Trek character Spock and designed as a character who "would frequently change sides (between New Genesis and Apokolips)".[1] Fictional character biography[edit] Although he possesses the powers of a god, Metron is typically depicted as a passive observer in the DC Universe rather than an active participant. He wanders in search of greater knowledge beyond his own, riding on his Mobius Chair, which can traverse time and space instantaneously
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