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Mauri People
Mauri (from which derives the English term "Moors") was the Latin designation for the Berber population of Mauretania
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Māori People
A people is a plurality of persons considered as a whole, as is the case with an ethnic group or nation. Collectively, for example, the contemporary Frisians
Frisians
and Danes
Danes
are two related Germanic peoples, while various Middle Eastern ethnic groups are often linguistically categorized as Semitic peoples.Contents1 In politics 2 In law 3 See also 4 ReferencesIn politics Main article: Commoner Liberty Leading the People
Liberty Leading the People
by Eugène DelacroixVarious states govern, or claim to govern, in the name of the people. Both the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
used the Latin
Latin
term Senatus Populusque Romanus, (the Senate and People
People
of Rome)
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Maximian
Maximian
Maximian
(Latin: Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
Valerius Maximianus Herculius Augustus;[9] c. 250 – c. July 310)[7] was Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 286 to 305. He was Caesar[1][2] from 285 to 286, then Augustus
Augustus
from 286[3] to 305.[4] He shared the latter title with his co-emperor and superior, Diocletian, whose political brain complemented Maximian's military brawn. Maximian
Maximian
established his residence at Trier
Trier
but spent most of his time on campaign. In late 285, he suppressed rebels in Gaul known as the Bagaudae. From 285 to 288, he fought against Germanic tribes along the Rhine
Rhine
frontier
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Maghreb
المغرب‎‎ al-Maɣréb ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵗⴰ / Tamazɣa‎Countries and territories Algeria Libya Mauritania Morocco Tunisia Western SaharaMajor regional organizations Arab League, Arab Maghreb
Maghreb
Union, Community of Sahel-Saharan StatesLanguages Arabic
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Tertullian
Tertullian
Tertullian
(/tərˈtʌliən/), full name Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, c. 155 – c. 240 AD,[1] was a prolific early Christian author from Carthage
Carthage
in the Roman province of Africa.[2] Of Berber origin,[3][4][5][6][7] he was the first Christian author to produce an extensive corpus of Latin Christian literature. He also was an early Christian apologist and a polemicist against heresy, including contemporary Christian Gnosticism.[8] Tertullian
Tertullian
has been called "the father of Latin Christianity"[9][10] and "the founder of Western theology."[11] Though conservative in his worldview, Tertullian
Tertullian
originated new theological concepts and advanced the development of early Church doctrine. He is perhaps most famous for being the first writer in Latin known to use the term trinity (Latin: trinitas)
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Augustine Of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
(/ɔːˈɡʌstɪn/; 13 November 354 – 28 August 430)[1] was an early Christian theologian
Christian theologian
and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity
Western Christianity
and Western philosophy. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius
Hippo Regius
in north Africa and is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers
Church Fathers
in Western Christianity
Christianity
for his writings in the Patristic Era. Among his most important works are The City of God, On Christian Doctrine
On Christian Doctrine
and Confessions. According to his contemporary Jerome, Augustine "established anew the ancient Faith".[note 1] In his youth he was drawn to Manichaeism, later to neo-Platonism
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Saint Maurice
Saint
Saint
Maurice (also Moritz, Morris, or Mauritius; Coptic: Ⲁⲃⲃⲁ Ⲙⲱⲣⲓⲥ) was according to tradition the leader of the legendary Roman Theban Legion
Theban Legion
in the 3rd century, and one of the favorite and most widely venerated saints of that group. He was the patron saint of several professions, locales, and kingdoms
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Aurelian
Aurelian
Aurelian
(Latin: Lucius Domitius Aurelianus Augustus;[2][3] 9 September 214 or 215 – September or October 275) was Roman Emperor from 270 to 275. Born in humble circumstances, he rose through the military ranks to become emperor. During his reign, he defeated the Alamanni
Alamanni
after a devastating war. He also defeated the Goths, Vandals, Juthungi, Sarmatians, and Carpi. Aurelian
Aurelian
restored the Empire's eastern provinces after his conquest of the Palmyrene Empire
Palmyrene Empire
in 273. The following year he conquered the Gallic Empire
Gallic Empire
in the west, reuniting the Empire in its entirety
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Zenobia
Septimia Zenobia
Zenobia
(Palmyrene: (Btzby), pronounced Bat-Zabbai; AD c.240–c.274) was a third-century queen of the Syria-based Palmyrene Empire. Many legends surround her ancestry; she was born to a noble Palmyrene family and married the ruler of the city, Odaenathus. Her husband became king in 260, elevating Palmyra
Palmyra
to supreme power in the Near East
Near East
by defeating the Sassanians
Sassanians
and stabilizing the Roman East. After Odaenathus' assassination, Zenobia
Zenobia
became the regent of her son Vaballathus
Vaballathus
and held de facto power throughout his reign. In 270, Zenobia
Zenobia
launched an invasion which brought most of the Roman East under her sway and culminated with the annexation of Egypt
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Notitia Dignitatum
The Notitia Dignitatum
Notitia Dignitatum
( Latin
Latin
for "The List of Offices") is a document of the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
that details the administrative organization of the Eastern and Western Empires. It is unique as one of very few surviving documents of Roman government and describes several thousand offices from the imperial court to provincial governments, diplomatic missions, and army units. It is usually considered to be accurate for the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the AD 420s and for the Eastern or Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
in the AD 390s
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Sirte
Sirte
Sirte
(/ˈsɜːrt/; Arabic: سرت‎,  pronunciation (help·info); from Ancient Greek: Σύρτις), also spelled Sirt, Surt, Sert or Syrte, is a city in Libya. It is located south of the Gulf of Sirte, between Tripoli
Tripoli
and Benghazi. It is famously known for its battles, ethnic groups, and loyalism to Muammar Gaddafi. Also due to its development, it was the capital of Libya
Libya
as Tripoli's successer after the Fall of Tripoli since September 1, 2011 to October 20, 2011. The settlement was established in the early 20th century by the Italians, at the site of a 19th-century fortress built by the Ottomans
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Illyricum (Roman Province)
New provinces of Dalmatia
Dalmatia
and Pannonia
Pannonia
created69/79 ADIllyricum /ɪˈlɪrɪkəm/ was a Roman province
Roman province
that existed from 27 BC to sometime during the reign of Vespasian (69–79 AD). The province comprised Illyria/ Dalmatia
Dalmatia
and Pannonia. Illyria
Illyria
included the area along the east coast of the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
and its inland mountains. With the creation of this province it came to be called Dalmatia. It was in the south, while Pannonia
Pannonia
was in the north. Illyria/ Dalmatia
Dalmatia
stretched from the River Drin (in modern northern Albania) to Istria
Istria
(Croatia) and the River Sava
Sava
in the north
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Tripolitania
Tripolitania
Tripolitania
/trɪpɒlɪˈteɪniə/ or Tripolitana (Arabic: طرابلس‎ Ṭarābulus, Berber: Ṭrables, from Vulgar Latin *Trapoletanius, from Latin
Latin
Regio Tripolitana, from Greek Τριπολιτάνια) is a historic region and former province of Libya. Tripolitania
Tripolitania
was a separate Italian colony from 1927 to 1934
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Baetica
Hispania
Hispania
Baetica, often abbreviated Baetica, was one of three Roman provinces in Hispania
Hispania
(the Iberian Peninsula). Baetica was bordered to the west by Lusitania, and to the northeast by Hispania
Hispania
Tarraconensis. Baetica remained one of the basic divisions of Hispania
Hispania
under the Visigoths
Visigoths
down to 711. Baetica (Spanish: Bética) was part of Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
under the Moors
Moors
in the 8th century and approximately corresponds to modern Andalucia.Contents1 History 2 Governors 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Before Romanization, the mountainous area that was to become Baetica was occupied by several settled Iberian tribal groups
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Count Theodosius
Count
Count
Theodosius (Latin: Comes Theodosius) was a senior military officer serving in the Western Roman Empire. He is also known as Flavius Theodosius or as Theodosius the Elder, distinguishing him from his son, the Roman emperor
Roman emperor
Theodosius I. He was granted the title of Comes of the Britains (Comes Britanniarum) for his work there putting down the Great Conspiracy
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Ammianus Marcellinus
Ammianus Marcellinus
Ammianus Marcellinus
(born c. 330[1], died c. 391 – 400) was a Roman soldier and historian who wrote the penultimate major historical account surviving from Antiquity (preceding Procopius)
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