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Maryland House Of Delegates
Majority  Democratic (91)Minority  Republican (50)Length of term4 yearsAuthority Article III, Section 2, Maryland ConstitutionSalary $43,500/year + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 4, 2014 (141 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (141 seats)Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeHouse of Delegates Chamber Maryland State House Annapolis, MarylandWebsiteMaryland House of DelegatesThe Maryland House of Delegates is the lower house of the legislature of the State of Maryland. It consists of 141 delegates elected from 47 districts. The House of Delegates Chamber is in the Maryland State House on State Circle in Annapolis, the state capital. The State House also houses the Maryland State Senate
Maryland State Senate
Chamber and the offices of the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of the State of Maryland
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Proprietary Colony
A proprietary colony was a type of British colony mostly in North America and the Caribbean
Caribbean
in the 17th century.[1] In the British Empire, all land belonged to the ruler, and it was his prerogative to divide. Therefore, all colonial properties were partitioned by royal charter into one of four types: proprietary, royal, joint stock, or covenant. King Charles II used the proprietary solution to reward allies and focus his own attention on Britain itself. He offered his friends colonial charters which facilitated private investment and colonial self-government. The charters made the proprietor the effective ruler, albeit one ultimately responsible to English Law and the King
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Reapportionment
Apportionment is the process by which seats in a legislative body are distributed among administrative divisions entitled to representation.Contents1 Apportionment in theory1.1 Common problems 1.2 Apportionment by district 1.3 Apportionment by party list 1.4 Mathematics of apportionment2 Malapportionment 3 Anomalies by country3.1 Australia 3.2 Canada 3.3 Ireland 3.4 Japan 3.5 Malaysia 3.6 New Zealand 3.7 Norway 3.8 Slovakia 3.9 South Africa 3.10 Spain 3.11 United Kingdom 3.12 United States3.12.1 Senate 3.12.2 House 3.12.3 President 3.12.4 State senates 3.12.5 State legislatures 3.12.6 Prospects for change4 See also 5 References 6 External linksApportionment in theory[edit] The simplest and most universal principle is that elections should give each voter's intentions equal weight. This is both intuitive and stated in historical documents such as the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States
United States
Constitution (the Equal Protection Clause)
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Exclusive Rights
In Anglo-Saxon law, an exclusive right, or exclusivity, is a de facto, non-tangible prerogative existing in law (that is, the power or, in a wider sense, right) to perform an action or acquire a benefit and to permit or deny others the right to perform the same action or to acquire the same benefit. A "prerogative" is in effect an exclusive right. The term is restricted for use for official state or sovereign (i.e., constitutional) powers. Exclusive rights are a form of monopoly. Exclusive rights can be established by law or by contractual obligation, but the scope of enforceability will depend upon the extent to which others are bound by the instrument establishing the exclusive right; thus in the case of contractual rights, only persons that are parties to a contract will be affected by the exclusivity. Exclusive rights may be granted in property law, copyright law, patent law, in relation to public utilities, or, in some jurisdictions, in other sui generis legislation
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Minority Whip
A whip is an official of a political party whose task is to ensure party discipline in a legislature. Whips are the party's "enforcers"; they invite their fellow legislators to attend voting sessions and to vote according to the official party policy. The term is taken from the "whipper-in" during a hunt, who tries to prevent the hounds from wandering away from the pack. Additionally, the term "whip" may mean the voting instructions issued to members by the whip[1], or the status of a certain legislator in their party's parliamentary grouping.Contents1 Etymology 2 Australia 3 Canada 4 Greece 5 India 6 Ireland 7 Malaysia 8 New Zealand 9 South Africa 10 United Kingdom 11 United States 12 Whips in other parts of the world 13 In popular culture 14 References 15 External linksEtymology[edit] The expression whip in its parliamentary context has its origins in hunting terminology
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Lower House
A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house.[1] Despite its official position "below" the upper house, in many legislatures worldwide, the lower house has come to wield more power. The lower house typically is the larger of the two chambers, i.e. its members are more numerous
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Royal Colony
Crown colony, dependent territory and royal colony are terms used to describe the administration of United Kingdom
United Kingdom
overseas territories that are controlled by the UK government. As such they are examples of dependencies that are under direct colonial rule. Since 2002, crown colonies have been known officially as British Overseas Territories.[1] In such territories, residents do not elect members of the British parliament. A crown colony is usually administered by a governor who directly controls the executive and is appointed by "the Crown" – a term that in practice usually means the UK government, acting on behalf of the monarch
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Annapolis
Annapolis (/əˈnæpəlɪs/) is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, as well as the county seat of Anne Arundel
Anne Arundel
County. Situated on the Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
at the mouth of the Severn River, 25 miles (40 km) south of Baltimore
Baltimore
and about 30 miles (50 km) east of Washington, D.C., Annapolis is part of the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area. Its population was measured at 38,394 by the 2010 census. The city served as the seat of the Confederation Congress
Confederation Congress
(former Second Continental Congress) and temporary national capital of the United States
United States
in 1783–1784. At that time, General George Washington came before the body convened in the new Maryland
Maryland
State House and resigned his commission as commander of the Continental Army
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Anne Arundel County
Anne Arundel County
County
/ˌænəˈrʌndəl/ is a county in the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census, its population was 537,656,[1] a population increase of just under 10% since 2000.[2] Its county seat is Annapolis,[3] which is also the capital of the state
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United States Census
The United States
United States
Census
Census
is a decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States
United States
Constitution, which states: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States ... according to their respective Numbers ... . The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years."[1][2] The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is responsible for the United States
United States
Census
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Bicameral
A bicameral legislature divides the legislators into two separate assemblies, chambers, or houses. Bicameralism
Bicameralism
is distinguished from unicameralism, in which all members deliberate and vote as a single group, and from some legislatures that have three or more separate assemblies, chambers, or houses. As of 2015, fewer than half the world's national legislatures are bicameral.[1] Often, the members of the two chambers are elected or selected by different methods, which vary from country to country. This can often lead to the two chambers having very different compositions of members. Enactment of primary legislation often requires a concurrent majority – the approval of a majority of members in each of the chambers of the legislature. When this is the case, the legislature may be called an example of perfect bicameralism
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Caucus
A caucus is a meeting of supporters or members of a specific political party or movement. The term originated in the United States, but has spread to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa
South Africa
and Nepal
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Independent (politics)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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United States Democratic Party
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Pro Tempore
Pro tempore (/ˌproʊ ˈtɛmpəri/, /ˌproʊ ˈtɛmpərɛ/ or /ˌproʊ ˈtɛmpəreɪ/), abbreviated pro tem or p.t.,[1][2] is a Latin
Latin
phrase which best translates to "for the time being" in English. This phrase is often used to describe a person who acts as a locum tenens (placeholder) in the absence of a superior, such as the President pro tempore of the United States
United States
Senate, who acts in place of the President of the United States
United States
Senate, the Vice President of the United States. Legislative bodies can have one or more pro tempore for the presiding officer
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Majority Leader
In U.S. politics, the majority floor leader is a partisan position in a legislative body.[1] In the federal Congress, the role of the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives and the Majority Leader of the United States Senate differ slightly. In the United States Senate, the majority leader is the chief spokesperson for the majority party,[1] as the president of the Senate is also the Vice-President of the United States, and the President pro tempore, though technically a substitute for the president of the Senate, is in reality a largely ceremonial position (albeit powerful nonetheless, being third in line of succession to the presidency). In the United States House of Representatives, the majority leader is elected by U.S. Congressmen in the political party holding the largest number of seats in the House
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