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Mary Pickford
Gladys Louise Smith (April 8, 1892 – May 29, 1979), known professionally as Mary Pickford, was a Canadian-born film actress and producer. She was a co-founder of both the Pickford-Fairbanks Studio (along with Douglas Fairbanks) and, later, the United Artists
United Artists
film studio (with Fairbanks, Charlie Chaplin and D.W. Griffith), and one of the original 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences who present the yearly "Oscar" award ceremony.[3] Pickford was known in her prime as "America's Sweetheart"[4][5][6] and the "girl with the curls".[6] She was one of the Canadian pioneers in early Hollywood and a significant figure in the development of film acting. Pickford was one of the earliest stars to be billed under her own name, and was one of the most popular actresses of the 1910s and 1920s, earning the nickname "Queen of the Movies". She is credited as having defined the ingénue archetype in cinema
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Independent Moving Pictures
Independent or The Independents may refer to:Contents1 Mathematics, probability theory and statistics 2 Media, music and art 3 Politics 4 Military 5 US college sports 6 Other uses 7 See alsoMathematics, probability theory and statistics[edit]A collection of objects satisfying a precise definition of "independence", see Independence (other) for possible definitions Independent variable, the ar
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Academy Awards
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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Sandwich Board
A sandwich board is a type of advertisement composed of two boards (holding a message or graphic) and being either:Carried by a person, with one board in front and one behind, creating a "sandwich" effect; or Set up (for example next to a store advertising its goods) in a triangle shape, hinged along the top.The carried version is usually attached to straps acting as suspenders, allowing the person wearing the boards to carry the weight on his or her shoulders and keeping the boards balanced on the wearer. Sandwich
Sandwich
boards are most typically deployed in busy pedestrian areas and advertise businesses within easy walking distance. The wearer might also pass out flyers or shout advertising slogans
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East Coast Of The United States
The East Coast
Coast
of the United States
United States
is the coastline along which the Eastern United States
Eastern United States
meets the North Atlantic Ocean. This area is also known as the Eastern Seaboard, the Atlantic Coast
Coast
and the Atlantic Seaboard
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West Coast Of The United States
The West Coast or Pacific Coast is the coastline along which the contiguous Western United States meets the North Pacific Ocean. As a region, this term most often refers to the coastal states of California, Oregon and Washington. More specifically, it refers to an area defined on the east by the Cascade Range, Sierra Nevada and Mojave Desert, and on the west by the Pacific Ocean. The U.S
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Charwoman
A charwoman, char or (ironically or in genteel phrasing) charlady is an English cleaning woman who can be employed in houses, shops and/or office buildings. The term charwoman was also used as an official job title in the United States before 1960, which included use by municipal and state governments and by federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Commerce and Labor (such as in the Bureau of the Census and the Bureau of Immigration). Charwomen were often commonly referred to as scrubwomen. The word has the same root as "chore woman", one hired to do odd chores around the house. Description[edit] A char or chare was a turn (of work) in the sixteenth century,[1] which gave rise to the word being used as a prefix to denote people working in domestic service
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Nickelodeon (movie Theater)
The nickelodeon was the first type of indoor exhibition space dedicated to showing projected motion pictures. Usually set up in converted storefronts, these small, simple theaters charged five cents for admission and flourished from about 1905 to 1915. "Nickelodeon" was concocted from nickel, the name of the U.S. five-cent coin, and the ancient Greek word odeion, a roofed-over theater, the latter indirectly by way of the Odéon in Paris, emblematic of a very large and luxurious theater much as Ritz was of a grand hotel. For unknown reasons, in 1949 the lyricist of a popular song, Music! Music! Music!, incorporated the refrain "Put another nickel in, in the nickelodeon…", evidently referring to either a jukebox or a mechanical musical instrument such as a coin-operated player piano or orchestrion. The meaning of the word has been muddied ever since
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Edmund Burke
Edmund Burke
Edmund Burke
(/bɜːrk/; 12 January [NS] 1730[2] – 9 July 1797) was an Irish[3][4] statesman born in Dublin, as well as an author, orator, political theorist and philosopher, who after moving to London in 1750 served as a member of parliament (MP) between 1766 and 1794 in the House of Commons with the Whig Party. Burke was a proponent of underpinning virtues with manners in society and of the importance of religion in moral life.[5][page needed] These views were expressed in his A Vindication of Natural Society. Burke criticized British treatment of the American colonies, including through its taxation policies. He also supported the rights of the colonists to resist metropolitan authority, though he opposed the attempt to achieve independence
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Chauncey Olcott
Chauncey Olcott
Chauncey Olcott
[born John Chancellor Olcott][1] (July 21, 1858 – March 18, 1932) was an American stage actor, songwriter and singer of Irish descent.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Further reading 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in Buffalo, New York. His mother, Margaret (née Doyle), was a native of Killeagh, County Cork.[3] Actor
Actor
Chauncey Olcott, c. 1896, photo by W. M. MorrisonIn the early years of his career Olcott sang in minstrel shows, before studying singing in London during the 1880s. Lillian Russell
Lillian Russell
played a major role in helping make him a Broadway star.[4] When the producer Augustus Pitou approached him in 1893 to succeed William J. Scanlan
William J

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Tom Show
Tom show
Tom show
is a general term for any play or musical based (often only loosely) on the 1852 novel Uncle Tom's Cabin
Uncle Tom's Cabin
by Harriet Beecher Stowe. The novel attempts to depict the harsh reality of slavery. Due to the weak copyright laws at the time, a number of unauthorized plays based on the novel were staged for decades, many of them mocking the novel's strong characters and social message, and leading to the pejorative term "Uncle Tom". Even though Uncle Tom's Cabin
Uncle Tom's Cabin
was the best-selling novel of the 19th century, far more Americans of that time saw the story in a stage play or musical than read the book.[1] Some of these shows were essentially minstrel shows that utilized caricatures and stereotypes of black people, and thus inverting the intent of the novel
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Purser
A ship's purser (also purser or pusser)[1] is the person on a ship principally responsible for the handling of money on board. On modern merchant ships, the purser is the officer responsible for all administration (including the ship's cargo and passenger manifests) and supply; frequently the cooks and stewards answer to them as well.Contents1 History 2 Aircraft 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The purser joined the warrant officer ranks of the Royal Navy in the early 14th century and existed as a naval rank until 1852. The development of the warrant officer system began in 1040, when five English ports began furnishing warships to King Edward the Confessor in exchange for certain privileges. They also furnished crews whose officers were the Master, Boatswain, Carpenter
Carpenter
and Cook. Later these officers were "warranted" by the British Admiralty. Pursers received no pay but were entitled to profits made through their business activities
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Irish Catholic
Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
are an ethnoreligious group native to Ireland[1][2] that are both Catholic and Irish. Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
have a large diaspora, which includes more than 36 million Americans.[3] Divisions between Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
and Irish Protestants played a major role in the history of Ireland
Ireland
from the 16th to the 20th century, especially the Home Rule Crisis
Home Rule Crisis
and the Troubles. While religion broadly marks the delineation of these divisions, the contentions were primarily political and related to access to power
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Methodism
Methodism
Methodism
or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England. George Whitefield
George Whitefield
and John Wesley's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work,[1] today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.[2][nb 1] Wesley's theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
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Toronto
Toronto
Toronto
(/təˈrɒntoʊ/ ( listen) tə-RON-toh, locally  [təˈɹɑnoʊ] (help·info)), officially the City of Toronto, is the capital of the Canadian province of Ontario. It is located within the Golden Horseshoe
Golden Horseshoe
in Southern Ontario
Ontario
on the northern shore of Lake Ontario. With 2,731,571 residents in 2016, it is the largest city in Canada
Canada
and fourth-largest city in North America by population
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American Film Institute
The American Film Institute
American Film Institute
(AFI) is an American film
American film
organization that educates filmmakers and honors the heritage of the motion picture arts in the United States. AFI is supported by private funding and public membership.Contents1 Leadership 2 History 3 List of programs in brief 4 AFI Conservatory4.1 Notable alumni5 AFI programs5.1 AFI Catalog of Feature Films 5.2 AFI Life Achievement Award 5.3 AFI Awards 5.4 AFI Maya Deren Award 5.5 AFI 100 Years... series 5.6 AFI film festivals5.6.1 AFI Fest 5.6.2 AFI Docs5.7 AFI Silver
AFI Silver
Theatre and Cultural Center 5.8 The AFI Directing Workshop for Women6 AFI Directors Series 7 In popular culture 8 2017 Sexual harassment allegations 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksLeadership[edit] The institute is composed of leaders from the film, entertainment, business and academic communities
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