HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Marxist Bibliography
Marxism
Marxism
is a method of socioeconomic analysis that analyzes class relations and societal conflict, that uses a materialist interpretation of historical development, and a dialectical view of social transformation
[...More...]

"Marxist Bibliography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Historical Determinism
Historical determinism is the stance that events are historically predetermined or currently constrained by various forces. Historical determinism can be understood in contrast to its negation, i.e. the rejection of historical determinism. Some political philosophies (e.g. Early and Stalinist Marxism) assert a historical materialism of either predetermination or constraint, or both. Used as a pejorative, it is normally meant to designate an overdetermination of present possibilities by historical conditions. See also[edit]Geographic determinism Geopolitics Bad faith (existentialism) Determinism Economic determinism False consciousness False necessity Free Will Human nature Hegelianism Dialectical materialism Self determinationExternal links[edit]Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo
[...More...]

"Historical Determinism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

A Contribution To The Critique Of Political Economy
Politics
Politics
(from Greek: πολιτικά, translit. Politiká, meaning "affairs of the cities") is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group.[1] It refers to achieving and exercising positions of governance—organized control over a human community, particularly a state.[2] In modern nation states, people have formed political parties to represent their ideas. They agree to take the same position on many issues, and agree to support the same changes to law and the same leaders.[3] An election is usually a competition between different parties.[4] Some examples of political parties are the African National Congress (ANC) in South Africa, the Tories
Tories
in Great Britain
Great Britain
and the Indian National Congress. Politics
Politics
is a multifaceted word
[...More...]

"A Contribution To The Critique Of Political Economy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Capital (economics)
In economics, capital consists of anything that can enhance a person's power to perform economically useful work. Capital goods, real capital, or capital assets are already-produced, durable goods or any non-financial asset that is used in production of goods or services.[1] Adam Smith
Adam Smith
defines capital as "That part of a man's stock which he expects to afford him revenue". The term "stock" is derived from the Old English word for stump or tree trunk. It has been used to refer to all the moveable property of a farm since at least 1510.[2] How a capital good is maintained or returned to its pre-production state varies with the type of capital involved. In most cases capital is replaced after a depreciation period as newer forms of capital make continued use of current capital non profitable
[...More...]

"Capital (economics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Class Conflict
Class conflict, frequently referred to as class warfare or class struggle, is the tension or antagonism which exists in society due to competing socioeconomic interests and desires between people of different classes. The view that the class struggle provides the lever for radical social change for the majority is central to the work of communist Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and the anarchist Mikhail Bakunin. Class conflict
Class conflict
can take many different forms: direct violence, such as wars fought for resources and cheap labor; indirect violence, such as deaths from poverty, starvation, illness or unsafe working conditions; coercion, such as the threat of losing a job or the pulling of an important investment; or ideologically, such as with books and articles
[...More...]

"Class Conflict" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wage Labour
Wage
Wage
labour (also wage labor in American English) is the socioeconomic relationship between a worker and an employer, where the worker sells his or her labour power under a formal or informal employment contract.[1] These transactions usually occur in a labour market where wages are market determined.[2] In exchange for the wages paid, the work product generally becomes the undifferentiated property of the employer, except for special cases such as the vesting of intellectual property patents in the United States where patent rights are usually vested in the employee personally responsible for the invention
[...More...]

"Wage Labour" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Factors Of Production (Marxism)
Production
Production
may be: In Economics: Production
Production
(economics) Outline of industrial organization, the act of making products (goods and services) Produc
[...More...]

"Factors Of Production (Marxism)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Das Kapital
Capital. Critique of Political Economy (German: Das Kapital. Kritik der politischen Ökonomie, pronounced [das kapiˈtaːl, kʁiːtɪk deːɐ pɔliːtɪʃən øːkoːnoːmiː] also known as just Das Kapital; 1867–1883) by Karl Marx
Karl Marx
is a foundational theoretical text in materialist philosophy, economics and politics.[1] Marx aimed to reveal the economic patterns underpinning the capitalist mode of production, in contrast to classical political economists such as Adam Smith, Jean-Baptiste Say, David Ricardo
David Ricardo
and John Stuart Mill. Marx did not live to publish the planned second and third parts, but they were both completed from his notes and published after his death by his colleague Friedrich Engels
[...More...]

"Das Kapital" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Capitalist Mode Of Production (Marxist Theory)
In Karl Marx's critique of political economy and subsequent Marxian analyses, the capitalist mode of production refers to the systems of organizing production and distribution within capitalist societies. Private money-making in various forms (renting, banking, merchant trade, production for profit and so on) preceded the development of the capitalist mode of production as such
[...More...]

"Capitalist Mode Of Production (Marxist Theory)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Communist Manifesto
The Communist Manifesto
The Communist Manifesto
(originally Manifesto of the Communist Party) is an 1848 political pamphlet by German philosophers Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and Friedrich Engels. Commissioned by the Communist League
Communist League
and originally published in London (in German as Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei) just as the revolutions of 1848 began to erupt, the Manifesto was later recognised as one of the world's most influential political documents
[...More...]

"The Communist Manifesto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theses On Feuerbach
The "Theses on Feuerbach" are eleven short philosophical notes written by Karl Marx
Karl Marx
as a basic outline for the first chapter of the book The German Ideology in 1845. Like the book for which they were written, the theses were never published in Marx's lifetime, seeing print for the first time in 1888 as an appendix to a pamphlet by his co-thinker Friedrich Engels
[...More...]

"Theses On Feuerbach" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marxian Class Theory
In Marxism, Marxian class theory
Marxian class theory
asserts that an individual’s position within a class hierarchy is determined by his or her role in the production process, and argues that political and ideological consciousness is determined by class position.[1] A class is those who share common economic interests, are conscious of those interests, and engage in collective action which advances those interests.[2] Within Marxian class theory, the structure of the production process forms the basis of class construction. To Marx, a class is a group with intrinsic tendencies and interests that differ from those of other groups within society, the basis of a fundamental antagonism between such groups
[...More...]

"Marxian Class Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Surplus Value
Surplus value
Surplus value
is a central concept in Karl Marx's critique of political economy. "Surplus value" is a translation of the German word "Mehrwert", which simply means value added (sales revenue less the cost of materials used up). Conventionally, value-added is equal to the sum of gross wage income and gross profit income. However, Marx uses the term Mehrwert to describe the yield, profit or return on production capital invested, i.e. the amount of the increase in the value of capital
[...More...]

"Surplus Value" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Base And Superstructure
In Marxist theory, human society consists of two parts: the base (or substructure) and superstructure. The base comprises the forces and relations of production (e.g. employer–employee work conditions, the technical division of labour, and property relations) into which people enter to produce the necessities and amenities of life. The base determines society's other relationships and ideas to comprise its superstructure, including its culture, institutions, political power structures, roles, rituals, and state. While the relation of the two parts is not strictly causal, as the superstructure often affects the base, the influence of the base is predominant
[...More...]

"Base And Superstructure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Value-form
The value-form or form of value (German: Wertform)[1] is a concept in Karl Marx's critique of political economy, Marxism[2] and post-Marxism.[3] It refers to the social form of a tradeable thing as a symbol of value, which contrasts with its physical features, as an object which can satisfy some human need or serves a useful purpose.[4] The physical appearance of a commodity is directly observable, but the meaning of its social form is not.[5] Narrating the paradoxical oddities and metaphysical niceties of ordinary things when they become instruments of trade,[6] Marx seeks to provide a brief morphology of the category of economic value as such—what its substance really is, the forms which this substance takes, and how its magnitude is determined or expressed
[...More...]

"Value-form" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Surplus Product
Surplus product
Surplus product
(German: Mehrprodukt) is an economic concept explicitly theorised by Karl Marx
Karl Marx
in his critique of political economy
[...More...]

"Surplus Product" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.