HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Martin Karplus
Martin Karplus
Martin Karplus
(born March 15, 1930) is an Austrian-born American theoretical chemist. He is the Theodore William Richards
Theodore William Richards
Professor of Chemistry, emeritus at Harvard University. He is also Director of the Biophysical Chemistry
Chemistry
Laboratory, a joint laboratory between the French National Center for Scientific Research and the University of Strasbourg, France
[...More...]

"Martin Karplus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vienna
Vienna
Vienna
(/viˈɛnə/ ( listen);[9][10] German: Wien, pronounced [viːn] ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of Austria
Austria
and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna
Vienna
is Austria's primary city, with a population of about 1.8 million[1] (2.6 million within the metropolitan area,[4] nearly one third of Austria's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union
[...More...]

"Vienna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) or electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a method for studying materials with unpaired electrons. The basic concepts of EPR are analogous to those of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), but it is electron spins that are excited instead of the spins of atomic nuclei
[...More...]

"Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Oxford
Coordinates: 51°45′40″N 1°15′12″W / 51.7611°N 1.2534°W / 51.7611; -1.2534University of OxfordCoat of armsLatin: Universitas OxoniensisMotto Dominus Illuminatio Mea (Latin)Motto in English"The Lord is my Light"Established c. 1096; 922 years ago (1096)[1]Endowment £5.069 billion (inc
[...More...]

"University Of Oxford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Charles Coulson
Charles Alfred Coulson FRS FRSE (13 December 1910 – 7 January 1974) was a British applied mathematician, theoretical chemist and religious author.[1][2][3][4] His major scientific work was as a pioneer of the application of the quantum theory of valency to problems of molecular structure, dynamics and reactivity. He shared his deep religious belief, as a Methodist lay preacher, with the general public in radio broadcasts, served on the World Council of Churches
World Council of Churches
from 1962 to 1968 and was Chairman of Oxfam
Oxfam
from 1965 to 1971. Coulson went up to Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
in 1928, graduated in mathematics in 1931 and natural sciences in 1932, going on to receive a Ph.D. in 1936
[...More...]

"Charles Coulson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Quantum Chemistry
Quantum chemistry is a branch of chemistry whose primary focus is the application of quantum mechanics in physical models and experiments of chemical systems. It is also called molecular quantum mechanics.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Electronic structure3.1 Wave model 3.2 Valence bond 3.3 Molecular orbital 3.4 Density functional theory4 Chemical dynamics4.1 Adiabatic chemical dynamics 4.2 Non-adiabatic chemical dynamics5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] It involves heavy interplay of experimental and theoretical methods. Experimental
Experimental
quantum chemists rely heavily on spectroscopy, through which information regarding the quantization of energy on a molecular scale can be obtained
[...More...]

"Quantum Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Molecular Dynamics
Molecular dynamics
Molecular dynamics
(MD) is a computer simulation method for studying the physical movements of atoms and molecules. The atoms and molecules are allowed to interact for a fixed period of time, giving a view of the dynamic evolution of the system. In the most common version, the trajectories of atoms and molecules are determined by numerically solving Newton's equations of motion for a system of interacting particles, where forces between the particles and their potential energies are often calculated using interatomic potentials or molecular mechanics force fields
[...More...]

"Molecular Dynamics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Biomolecule
A biomolecule or biological molecule is a loosely used term for molecules and ions that are present in organisms, essential to some typically biological process such as cell division, morphogenesis, or development.[1] Biomolecules include large macromolecules (or polyanions) such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, as well as small molecules such as primary metabolites, secondary metabolites, and natural products. A more general name for this class of material is biological materials. Biomolecules are usually endogenous but may also be exogenous. For example, pharmaceutical drugs may be natural products or semisynthetic (biopharmaceuticals) or they may be totally synthetic. Biology
Biology
and its subsets of biochemistry and molecular biology study biomolecules and their reactions. Most biomolecules are organic compounds, and just four elements—oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen—make up 96% of the human body's mass
[...More...]

"Biomolecule" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Nuclear magnetic resonance
spectroscopy, most commonly known as NMR spectroscopy or magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), is a spectroscopic technique to observe local magnetic fields around atomic nuclei. The sample is placed in a magnetic field and the NMR signal is produced by excitation of the nuclei sample with radio waves into nuclear magnetic resonance, which is detected with sensitive radio receivers. The intramolecular magnetic field around an atom in a molecule changes the resonance frequency, thus giving access to details of the electronic structure of a molecule and its individual functional groups. As the fields are unique or highly characteristic to individual compounds, in modern organic chemistry practice, NMR spectroscopy is the definitive method to identify monomolecular organic compounds. Similarly, biochemists use NMR to identify proteins and other complex molecules
[...More...]

"Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

J-coupling
In nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics, Scalar or J-couplings (also called indirect dipole–dipole coupling) are mediated through chemical bonds connecting two spins. It is an indirect interaction between two nuclear spins which arises from hyperfine interactions between the nuclei and local electrons.[1] J-coupling
J-coupling
contains information about bond distance and angles. Most importantly, J-coupling
J-coupling
provides information on the connectivity of molecules
[...More...]

"J-coupling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coupling Constant
In physics, a coupling constant or gauge coupling parameter is a number that determines the strength of the force exerted in an interaction. Usually, the Lagrangian or the Hamiltonian of a system describing an interaction can be separated into a kinetic part and an interaction part. The coupling constant determines the strength of the interaction part with respect to the kinetic part, or between two sectors of the interaction part. For example, the electric charge of a particle is a coupling constant that characterizes an interaction with two charge-carrying fields and one photon field (hence the common Feynman diagram
Feynman diagram
with two arrows and one wavy line). Since photons carry electromagnetism, this coupling constant determines how strongly electrons feel such a force and has its value fixed by experiment. A coupling constant plays an important role in dynamics
[...More...]

"Coupling Constant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Harvard College
Harvard College
Harvard College
is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Harvard University. Founded in 1636 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, it is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States[2] and one of the most prestigious in the world.[3]Contents1 History 2 Academics 3 House system 4 Athletics 5 Student organizations 6 Notable alumni 7 Fictional alumni 8 Footnotes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: History of Harvard UniversityView of the ancient buildings belonging to Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass., New York Public LibraryView of freshman dormitories in Harvard YardThe school came into existence in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court (colonial legislature, second oldest in British America) of the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony—though without a single building, instructor, or student
[...More...]

"Harvard College" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dihedral Angles
A dihedral angle is the angle between two intersecting planes. In chemistry it is the angle between planes through two sets of three atoms, having two atoms in common. In solid geometry it is defined as the union of a line and two half-planes that have this line as a common edge
[...More...]

"Dihedral Angles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
Proton
Proton
nuclear magnetic resonance (proton NMR, hydrogen-1 NMR, or 1H NMR) is the application of nuclear magnetic resonance in NMR spectroscopy with respect to hydrogen-1 nuclei within the molecules of a substance, in order to determine the structure of its molecules.[1] In samples where natural hydrogen (H) is used, practically all the hydrogen consists of the isotope 1H (hydrogen-1; i.e. having a proton for a nucleus). A full 1H atom is called protium. Simple NMR spectra are recorded in solution, and solvent protons must not be allowed to interfere. Deuterated (deuterium = 2H, often symbolized as D) solvents especially for use in NMR are preferred, e.g. deuterated water, D2O, deuterated acetone, (CD3)2CO, deuterated methanol, CD3OD, deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide, (CD3)2SO, and deuterated chloroform, CDCl3
[...More...]

"Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Illinois At Champaign-Urbana
The Champaign–Urbana metropolitan area, also known as Champaign-Urbana and Urbana-Champaign, is a metropolitan area in east-central Illinois. It is the 191st largest metropolitan area in the U.S. It is composed of three counties, Champaign, Ford, and Piatt. The Office of Management and Budget
Office of Management and Budget
has designated the three-county Champaign-Urbana area as one of its metropolitan statistical areas (the Champaign-Urbana, IL MSA), which are used for statistical purposes by the Census Bureau and other agencies. The area has a population of 231,891 as determined by the 2010 U.S. Census.[1] The area is anchored by the principal cities of Champaign and Urbana and is home to the University of Illinois
Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign, the flagship campus of the University of Illinois system
[...More...]

"University Of Illinois At Champaign-Urbana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
[...More...]

"University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.