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Marlborough, Wiltshire
Marlborough (/ˈmɔːrlb(ə)rə/ ( listen) MORL-b(ə-)rə,[2] /ˈmɑːrl-/ MARL-)[3] is a market town and civil parish in the English county of Wiltshire
Wiltshire
on the Old Bath Road, the old main road from London to Bath. It boasts the second-widest high street in Britain, after Stockton-on-Tees.[citation needed] The town is on the River Kennet.Contents1 History 2 Climate 3 Town events 4 Notable buildings 5 Governance 6 Education 7 Sport 8 Religion8.1 Church of England9 Transport 10 Notable people 11 Twin towns 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External linksHistory[edit] The earliest sign of human habitation is a 62-foot-high (19 m) prehistoric tumulus in the grounds of Marlborough College. Recent radiocarbon dating has found it to date from about 2400 BC.[4] It is of similar age to the larger Silbury Hill
Silbury Hill
about 5 miles (8.0 km) west of the town
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Saxons
The Saxons
Saxons
(Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen) were a group of Germanic tribes first mentioned as living near the North Sea
North Sea
coast of what is now Germany
Germany
(Old Saxony), in the late Roman Empire. They were soon mentioned as raiding and settling in many North Sea
North Sea
areas, as well as pushing south inland towards the Franks
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Bath, Somerset
Bath is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859.[2] Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London
London
and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in 1987. The city became a spa with the Latin
Latin
name Aquae Sulis
Aquae Sulis
("the waters of Sulis") c.60  AD  when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although hot springs were known even before then. Bath Abbey
Bath Abbey
was founded in the 7th century and became a religious centre; the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries. In the 17th century, claims were made for the curative properties of water from the springs, and Bath became popular as a spa town in the Georgian era
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List Of Members Of The European Parliament For The United Kingdom, 2014–19
Legislation1972 EC Act 1986 EC (Amendment) Act 1993 EC (Amendment) Act 1998 EC (Amendment) Act 2002 EC (Amendment) Act 2008 EU (Amendment) Act 2011 EU ActEuropean Parliament Elections1979 1984 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 20141973 delegation 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8thWithdrawal2004–05 EU Bill 2013–14 EU (Referendum) Bill 2015–16 EU membership renegotiation 2015 EU Referendum Act 2016 EU (Referendum) Act (Gibraltar)2016 EU membership referendumCauses Endorsements Issues Opinion pollingCampaignsOrganisations advocating and campaigning for a referendumPeople's Pledge Labour for a ReferendumLeave Vote Leave
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Market Town
Market town
Market town
or market right is a legal term, originating in the Middle Ages, for a European settlement that has the right to host markets, distinguishing it from a village and city. A town may be correctly described as a "market town" or as having "market rights", even if it no longer holds a market, provided the legal right to do so still exists.Contents1 Brief history 2 Czech Republic 3 German-language area 4 Hungary 5 Norway 6 United Kingdom and Ireland6.1 England
England
and Wales 6.2 Ireland 6.3 Scotland7 In art and literature 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksBrief history[edit] The primary purpose of a market town is the provision of goods and services to the surrounding locality.[1] Although market towns were known in antiquity, their number increased rapidly from the 12th century
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Counties Of England
The counties of England
England
are areas used for the purposes of administrative, geographical, cultural or political demarcation. For administrative purposes, England
England
outside Greater London
Greater London
and the Isles of Scilly is divided into 83 metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties. These counties may consist of a single district or be divided into several districts. As of April 2009, 27 of these counties are divided into districts and have a county council
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Stockton-on-Tees
Stockton-on-Tees
Stockton-on-Tees
is a market town in the ceremonial county of County Durham, North East England. It is the major settlement in the borough of Stockton-on-Tees. The town has population of 105,682, and the wider borough a population of 238,000, according to 2017 estimates.Contents1 History1.1 Etymology 1.2 Early history 1.3 Industrial history2 Geography2.1 Climate 2.2 Town centre 2.3 Riverside3 Transport 4 Economy4.1 Development 4.2 Future development5 Public services5.1 Stockton Central Library 5.2 Emergency services6 Culture and leisure6.1 Active leisure 6.2 Theatres 6.3 Events 6.4 Public parks 6.5 Sport7 Notable people 8 Image gallery 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Etymology[edit] Stockton is an Anglo-Saxon name with the typical Anglo-Saxon place name ending 'ton' meaning farm, or homestead. The name is thought by some to derive from the Anglo-Saxon word Stocc meaning log, tree trunk or wooden post
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Fire Services In The United Kingdom
The fire services in the United Kingdom operate under separate legislative and administrative arrangements in England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and Scotland. Emergency cover is provided by over fifty fire and rescue services (FRS), which is the term used in modern legislation and by government departments.[1] Many FRS were previously known as brigades or county fire services, but almost all now use the standard terminology. They are distinct from and governed by a fire authority, which is the legislative, public and administrative body, made up of civilians (usually members of elected local or regional bodies). Fire authorities in England and Wales
England and Wales
(and formerly Scotland), and therefore fire and rescue services, receive a large proportion of their funding through a share of Council Tax
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Tumulus
A tumulus (plural tumuli) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds or kurgans, and may be found throughout much of the world. A cairn, which is a mound of stones built for various purposes, may also originally have been a tumulus. Tumuli are often categorised according to their external apparent shape. In this respect, a long barrow is a long tumulus, usually constructed on top of several burials, such as passage graves. A round barrow is a round tumulus, also commonly constructed on top of burials. The internal structure and architecture of both long and round barrows has a broad range, the categorization only refers to the external apparent shape. The method of inhumation may involve a dolmen, a cist, a mortuary enclosure, a mortuary house, or a chamber tomb
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Radiocarbon Dating
Radiocarbon dating
Radiocarbon dating
(also referred to as carbon dating or carbon-14 dating) is a method for determining the age of an object containing organic material by using the properties of radiocarbon (14C), a radioactive isotope of carbon. The method was developed by Willard Libby
Willard Libby
in the late 1940s and soon became a standard tool for archaeologists. Libby received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in 1960. The radiocarbon dating method is based on the fact that radiocarbon is constantly being created in the atmosphere by the interaction of cosmic rays with atmospheric nitrogen. The resulting radiocarbon combines with atmospheric oxygen to form radioactive carbon dioxide, which is incorporated into plants by photosynthesis; animals then acquire 14C by eating the plants
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Merlin (wizard)
Merlin
Merlin
(Welsh: Myrddin) is a legendary Welsh figure best known as the wizard or warlock featured in Arthurian legend
Arthurian legend
and medieval Welsh poetry. The standard depiction of the character first appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae, written c. 1136, and is based on an amalgamation of previous historical and legendary figures. Geoffrey combined existing stories of Myrddin Wyllt (Merlinus Caledonensis), a North Brythonic prophet and madman with no connection to King Arthur, with tales of the Romano-British
Romano-British
war leader Ambrosius Aurelianus to form the composite figure he called Merlin
Merlin
Ambrosius (Welsh: Myrddin Emrys)
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John Speed
John Speed
John Speed
(1551 or 1552 – 28 July 1629) was an English cartographer and historian.[1][2][3] He is the best known English mapmaker of the Stuart period.[4][5][6][7]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Legacy 4 Maps 5 Town inserts 6 Publications 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Speed was born at Farndon, Cheshire
Farndon, Cheshire
and went into the tailoring business of his father, Samuel, later in life.[8][9][10][11][12] While working in London, Speed was a tailor and member of a corresponding guild, and came to the attention of "learned" individuals.[13] These individuals included Sir Fulke Greville, who subsequently made him an allowance to enable him to devote his whole attention to research. By 1598 he had enough patronage to leave his manual labor job and "engage in full-time scholarship."[13] As a reward for his earlier efforts, Queen Elizabeth granted Speed the use of a room in the Custom House
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