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Marlborough Downs
Coordinates: 51°10′19″N 1°49′30″W / 51.172°N 1.825°W / 51.172; -1.825North Wessex DownsArea of Outstanding Natural BeautyThis is a typical view of the chalk North Wessex Downs
North Wessex Downs
in the north west part of HampshireCountry EnglandCounties Berkshire, Hampshire, Oxfordshire, WiltshireHighest point - location Walbury Hill - elevation 297 m (974 ft)Location of the North Wessex Downs
North Wessex Downs
AONB in the UKThe North Wessex Downs
North Wessex Downs
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
(AONB) (also known as the Chalkenwolds) is located in the English counties of West Berkshire, Hampshire, Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
and Wiltshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Southern England Chalk Formation
The Chalk Formation
Chalk Formation
of Southern England
England
is a system of chalk downland in the south of England. The formation is perhaps best known for Salisbury Plain, the location of Stonehenge, the Isle of Wight, and the twin ridgeways of the North Downs
North Downs
and South Downs.Contents1 Geography 2 Geology 3 See also 4 ReferencesGeography[edit] Ivinghoe Beacon
Ivinghoe Beacon
(the eastern trailhead) seen looking north from The Ridgeway. Ivinghoe Beacon
Ivinghoe Beacon
is a SSI.[1][2]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Chilterns AONB
The Chiltern Hills form a chalk escarpment[1] in South East England. They are known locally as "the Chilterns".[1] A large portion of the hills was designated officially as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in 1965.Contents1 Location 2 Geology 3 Physical characteristics3.1 Topography 3.2 Landscape and land use 3.3 Rivers 3.4 Transport routes4 History 5 Settlement5.1 List of towns and villages in the Chiltern hills area 5.2 Strip parishes associated with the Chilterns6 Economic use 7 Protection7.1 Chilterns Conservation Board 7.2 High Speed Rail 28 Chiltern Hundreds 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksLocation[edit] The Chilterns cover an area of 833 km2 (322 sq mi). They are 18 km (11 mi) wide at their widest, and stretch 74 km (46 mi) in a south west to north east diagonal from Goring-on-Thames in Oxfordshire, through Buckinghamshire, via Dunstable Downs and Deacon Hill in Bedfo
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River Thames
The River Thames
River Thames
(/tɛmz/ ( listen) TEMZ) is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England
England
and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford
Oxford
(where it is called Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head
Thames Head
in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea
North Sea
via the Thames Estuary
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Escarpment
An escarpment is a steep slope or long cliff that forms as an effect of faulting or erosion and separates two relatively leveled areas having differing elevations. Usually escarpment is used interchangeably with scarp. Some sources differentiate the two terms, however, where escarpment refers to the margin between two landforms, while scarp is synonymous with a cliff or steep slope.[1][2] The surface of the steep slope is called a scarp face
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Vale Of White Horse
The Vale of White Horse
Vale of White Horse
is a local government district of Oxfordshire in England. Located south of the River Thames, it is within the historic county boundaries of Berkshire. Most of the district had been part of Wantage Rural District in the county of Berkshire
Berkshire
until local government re-organisation in 1974. In 1974 the area of the rural district was split, with the parishes of Ardington, Blewbury, Childrey, Chilton, Denchworth, East Challow, East Hanney, East Hendred, Goosey, Grove, Harwell, Letcombe Bassett, Letcombe Regis, Lockinge, Sparsholt, Upton, West Challow, West Hanney and West Hendred
West Hendred
becoming part of the Vale of White Horse
Vale of White Horse
district in Oxfordshire, and the rest becoming part of the Newbury district of a smaller Berkshire
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Dip Slope
A dip slope is a topographic (geomorphic) surface which slopes in the same direction, and often by the same amount, as the true dip or apparent dip of the underlying strata.[1][2] A dip slope consists of the upper surface of a resistant layer of rock, often called caprock, that is commonly only slightly lowered and reduced in steepness by erosion. Dip slopes form the backslopes of cuestas, homoclinal ridges, hogbacks, and flatirons. The frontslopes of such ridges consist of either an escarpment, a steep slope, or perhaps even a line of cliffs. Generally, cuestas and homoclinal ridges are asymmetrical in that their dip slopes are less steep than their escarpments. In the case of hogbacks and flatirons, the dip of the rocks is so steep that their dip slope approaches the escarpment in their steepness.[1][3][4][5]The south-facing (right) side of Mount Rundle
Mount Rundle
in Canada
Canada
is a good example of a dip slope
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Lambourn
Lambourn
Lambourn
/ˈlæmbɔːrn/ is a large village and civil parish in West Berkshire. It lies just north of the M4 Motorway
M4 Motorway
between Swindon
Swindon
and Newbury, and borders Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the west and Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
to the north
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Marlborough, Wiltshire
Marlborough (/ˈmɔːrlb(ə)rə/ ( listen) MORL-b(ə-)rə,[2] /ˈmɑːrl-/ MARL-)[3] is a market town and civil parish in the English county of Wiltshire
Wiltshire
on the Old Bath Road, the old main road from London to Bath. It boasts the second-widest high street in Britain, after Stockton-on-Tees.[citation needed] The town is on the River Kennet.Contents1 History 2 Climate 3 Town events 4 Notable buildings 5 Governance 6 Education 7 Sport 8 Religion8.1 Church of England9 Transport 10 Notable people 11 Twin towns 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External linksHistory[edit] The earliest sign of human habitation is a 62-foot-high (19 m) prehistoric tumulus in the grounds of Marlborough College. Recent radiocarbon dating has found it to date from about 2400 BC.[4] It is of similar age to the larger Silbury Hill
Silbury Hill
about 5 miles (8.0 km) west of the town
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River Avon, Hampshire
Coordinates: 51°20′56″N 1°56′53″W / 51.349°N 1.948°W / 51.349; -1.948River Avon The River Avon in SalisburyCountry United KingdomCountry within the UK EnglandCounties Wiltshire, Hampshire, DorsetTributaries - left Bourne - right Nadder, EbbleSource - location Pewsey, WiltshireMouth English Channel - location Mudeford, DorsetLength 96 km (60 mi)The River Avon is a river in the south of England
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Uffington White Horse
Coordinates: 51°34′39″N 1°34′00″W / 51.57750°N 1.56667°W / 51.57750; -1.56667Whitehorse HillAerial view of the White HorseHighest pointElevation 261 m (856 ft)Prominence 79 m (259 ft)Listing County TopGeographyLocation Oxfordshire, EnglandOS grid SU301866Topo map OS Landranger 174The Uffington White Horse
Uffington White Horse
is a highly stylised prehistoric hill figure, 110 m (360 ft)[1] long, formed from deep trenches filled with crushed white chalk. The figure is situated on the upper slopes of White Horse Hill in the English civil parish of Uffington (in the ceremonial county of Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
and historic county of Berkshire), some 8 km (5 mi) south of the town of Faringdon and a similar distance west of the town of Wantage; or 2.5 km (1.6 mi) south of Uffington
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Downland
A downland is an area of open chalk hills. This term is especially used to describe the chalk countryside in southern England. Areas of downland are often referred to as downs, deriving from a Celtic word for "hills".Contents1 Formation 2 Hydrology 3 Soil 4 Habitat 5 Examples5.1 Southern England 5.2 United States6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFormation[edit] Downland
Downland
is formed when chalk formations are raised above the surrounding rocks. The chalk slowly erodes to form characteristic rolling hills and valleys. As the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
chalk layer in southern England is typically tilted, chalk downland formations often have a marked scarp slope on one side, which is very steep, and a dip slope on the other, which is much shallower
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Dorset
Dorset
Dorset
(/ˈdɔːrsɪt/; archaically, Dorsetshire) is a county in South West England
England
on the English Channel
English Channel
coast. The ceremonial county comprises the non-metropolitan county, which is governed by Dorset County Council, and the unitary authority areas of Poole
Poole
and Bournemouth. Covering an area of 2,653 square kilometres (1,024 sq mi), Dorset
Dorset
borders Devon
Devon
to the west, Somerset
Somerset
to the north-west, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the north-east, and Hampshire
Hampshire
to the east. The county town is Dorchester which is in the south. After the reorganisation of local government in 1974 the county's border was extended eastward to incorporate the Hampshire
Hampshire
towns of Bournemouth and Christchurch
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Lardon Chase
Lardon Chase, the Holies and Lough Down
Lardon Chase, the Holies and Lough Down
are three adjacent National Trust countryside properties in the English county of Berkshire. They are situated on the edge of the Berkshire
Berkshire
Downs above the village of Streatley and overlooking the Goring Gap. Together they comprise an outstanding area of 27 hectares (67 acres) of downland and woodland with many attractive walks and views. Lardon Chase, and a part of the Holies known as Holies Down, are also designated as Sites of Special Scientific Interest. The properties lie within the North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and in an area known for the presence of several Neolithic
Neolithic
and Iron Age
Iron Age
forts.[1][2][3][4][5] Lardon Chase and Lough Down comprise a spur of downland which lies to the west of Goring and Streatley
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Kent
Kent
Kent
/kɛnt/ is a county in South East England
England
and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London
Greater London
to the north west, Surrey
Surrey
to the west and East Sussex
East Sussex
to the south west. The county also shares borders with Essex
Essex
along the estuary of the River Thames, and with the French department of Pas-de-Calais
Pas-de-Calais
along the English Channel
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