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Market Entry
A market entry strategy is the planned method of delivering goods or services to a new target market and distributing them there. When importing or exporting services, it refers to establishing and managing contracts in a foreign country.Contents1 Factors 2 Timing of market entry 3 Strategies 4 Market entry and trade risks 5 Sources 6 ReferencesFactors[edit] Many companies successfully operate in a niche market without ever expanding into new markets. Some businesses achieve increased sales, brand awareness and business stability by entering a new market. Developing a market-entry strategy involves a thorough analysis of potential competitors and possible customers
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Target Market
A target market is a group of customers within a business's serviceable available market that the business has decided to aim its marketing efforts towards
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Turnkey Project
A turnkey or a turnkey project (also spelled turn-key) is a type of project that is constructed so that it can be sold to any buyer as a completed product. This is contrasted with build to order, where the constructor builds an item to the buyer's exact specifications, or when an incomplete product is sold with the assumption that the buyer would complete it. An advantage of the Turnkey Projects is that it is a way of obtaining a substantial economic profit from an asset. A turnkey project or contract as described by Duncan Wallace (1984) is:[1]…
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Liquidity Risk
Liquidity
Liquidity
risk is a financial risk that for a certain period of time a given financial asset, security or commodity cannot be traded quickly enough in the market without impacting the market price.Contents1 Types of liquidity risk 2 Causes 3 Pricing 4 Measures of liquidity risk4.1 Liquidity
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Foreign Exchange Risk
Foreign exchange risk
Foreign exchange risk
(also known as FX risk, exchange rate risk or currency risk) is a financial risk that exists when a financial transaction is denominated in a currency other than that of the base currency of the company. Foreign exchange risk
Foreign exchange risk
also exists when the foreign subsidiary of a firm maintains financial statements in a currency other than the reporting currency of the consolidated entity. The risk is that there may be an adverse movement in the exchange rate of the denomination currency in relation to the base currency before the date when the transaction is completed.[1][2] Investors and businesses exporting or importing goods and services or making foreign investments have an exchange rate risk which can have severe financial consequences; but steps can be taken to manage (i.e
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Systemic Risk
In finance, systemic risk is the risk of collapse of an entire financial system or entire market, as opposed to risk associated with any one individual entity, group or component of a system, that can be contained therein without harming the entire system.[1][2] It can be defined as "financial system instability, potentially catastrophic, caused or exacerbated by idiosyncratic events or conditions in financial intermediaries".[3] It refers to the risks imposed by interlinkages and interdependencies in a system or market, where the failure of a single entity or cluster of entities can cause a cascading failure, which could potentially bankrupt or bring down the entire system or market.[4] It is also sometimes erroneously referred to as "systematic risk".Contents1 Explanation 2 Measurement2.1 TBTF/TICTF2.1.1 TBTF 2.1.2 TICTF 2.1.3 Criticisms of systemic risk measurements2.2 SRISK2.2.1 Pair/Vine Copulas3 Valuation of assets and derivatives
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Systematic Risk
In finance and economics, systematic risk (in economics often called aggregate risk or undiversifiable risk) is vulnerability to events which affect aggregate outcomes such as broad market returns, total economy-wide resource holdings, or aggregate income. In many contexts, events like earthquakes and major weather catastrophes pose aggregate risks that affect not only the distribution but also the total amount of resources
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Risk
Risk
Risk
is the potential of gaining or losing something of value. Values (such as physical health, social status, emotional well-being, or financial wealth) can be gained or lost when taking risk resulting from a given action or inaction, foreseen or unforeseen (planned or not planned). Risk
Risk
can also be defined as the intentional interaction with uncertainty.[1] Uncertainty
Uncertainty
is a potential, unpredictable, and uncontrollable outcome; risk is a consequence of action taken in spite of uncertainty.[2] Risk perception is the subjective judgment people make about the severity and probability of a risk, and may vary person to person
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Permanent Establishment
A permanent establishment (PE) is a fixed place of business which generally gives rise to income or value-added tax liability in a particular jurisdiction. The term is defined in many income tax treaties and in most European Union Value Added Tax
Tax
systems
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Outsourcing
In business, outsourcing is an agreement in which one company contracts its own internal activity to different company.[1] It involves the contracting out of a business process (e.g. payroll processing, claims processing) and operational, and/or non-core functions (e.g. manufacturing, facility management, call center support) to another party (see also business process outsourcing). The concept "outsourcing" came from the American Glossary 'outside resourcing' and it dates back to at least 1981.[2][3] Outsourcing sometimes, though not always, involves transferring employees and assets from one firm to another
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Joint Ventures
A joint venture (JV) is a business entity created by two or more parties, generally characterized by shared ownership, shared returns and risks, and shared governance. Companies typically pursue joint ventures for one of four reasons: to access a new market, particularly emerging markets; to gain scale efficiencies by combining assets and operations; to share risk for major investments or projects; or to access skills and capabilities.[1] According to Gerard Baynham of Water Street Partners, there has been a lot of negative press about joint ventures, but objective data indicate that they may actually outperform wholly owned and controlled affiliates. He writes, "A different narrative emerged from our recent analysis of U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) data, collected from more than 20,000 entities. According to the DOC data, foreign joint ventures of U.S
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Exporting
International trade
International trade
is the exchange of capital, goods, and services across international borders or territories.[1] In most countries, such trade represents a significant share of gross domestic product (GDP). While international trade has existed throughout history (for example Uttarapatha, Silk Road, Amber Road, scramble for Africa, Atlantic slave trade, salt roads), its economic, social, and political importance has been on the rise in recent centuries.Contents1 Characteristic of global trade 2 History 3 Models 4 Most traded export products 5 Largest countries by total international trade 6 Top traded commodities (exports) 7 Observances 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External links11.1 Data11.1.1 Official statistics 11.1.2 Other data sources11.2 Other external linksCharacteristic of global trade[edit] Trading globally gives consumers and countries the opportunity to be exposed to new markets and products
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Niche Market
A niche market[1] is the subset of the market on which a specific product is focused. The market niche defines as the product features aimed at satisfying specific market needs, as well as the price range, production quality and the demographics that is intended to impact. It is also a small market segment. For example, sports channels like STAR Sports, ESPN, STAR Cricket, and Fox Sports target a niche of sports enthusiasts. Every product can be defined by its market niche. The niche market is highly specialized, and aiming to survive among the competition from numerous super companies
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Business Alliance
A business alliance is an agreement between businesses, usually motivated by cost reduction and improved service for the customer. Alliances are often bounded by a single agreement with equitable risk and opportunity share for all parties involved and are typically managed by an integrated project team
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