HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Marine Engineering
Marine engineering
Marine engineering
includes the engineering of boats, ships, oil rigs and any other marine vessel or structure, as well as oceanographic engineering. Specifically, marine engineering is the discipline of applying engineering sciences, including mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, electronic engineering, and computer science, to the development, design, operation and maintenance of watercraft propulsion and on-board systems and oceanographic technology
[...More...]

"Marine Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Design Engineering
A design engineer is a person who may be involved in any of various engineering disciplines including civil, mechanical, electrical, chemical, textiles, aerospace, nuclear, manufacturing, systems, and structural /building/architectural. Design engineers tend to work on products and systems that involve adapting and using complex scientific and mathematical techniques. The emphasis tends to be on utilizing engineering physics and sciences to develop solutions for society. The design engineer usually works with a team of engineers and other designers to develop conceptual and detailed designs that ensure a product actually functions, performs and is fit for its purpose. They may work with industrial designers and marketers to develop the product concept and specifications to meet customer needs and may direct the design effort
[...More...]

"Design Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Maritime Industry
Maritime transport
Maritime transport
is the transport of people (passengers) or goods (cargo) by water. Freight transport
Freight transport
has been achieved widely by sea throughout recorded history. Although the importance of sea travel for passengers has decreased due to aviation, it is effective for short trips and pleasure cruises. Transport
Transport
by water is cheaper than transport by air,[1] despite fluctuating exchange rates and a fee placed on top of freighting charges for carrier companies known as the Currency Adjustment Factor (CAF). Maritime transport
Maritime transport
can be realized over any distance by boat, ship, sailboat or barge, over oceans and lakes, through canals or along rivers. Shipping
Shipping
may be for commerce, recreation, or for military purposes
[...More...]

"Maritime Industry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Transportation Engineering
Transportation engineering
Transportation engineering
or transport engineering is the application of technology and scientific principles to the planning, functional design, operation and management of facilities for any mode of transportation in order to provide for the safe, efficient, rapid, comfortable, convenient, economical, and environmentally compatible movement of people and goods (transport)[citation needed]. It is a sub-discipline of civil engineering.[1] The importance of transportation engineering within the civil engineering profession can be judged by the number of divisions in ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers) that are directly related to transportation
[...More...]

"Transportation Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Geotechnical Engineering
Geotechnical engineering
Geotechnical engineering
is the branch of civil engineering concerned with the engineering behavior of earth materials. Geotechnical engineering is important in civil engineering, but also has applications in military, mining, petroleum and other engineering disciplines that are concerned with construction occurring on the surface or within the ground
[...More...]

"Geotechnical Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Earthquake Engineering
Earthquake
Earthquake
engineering is an interdisciplinary branch of engineering that designs and analyzes structures, such as buildings and bridges, with earthquakes in mind. Its overall goal is to make such structures more resistant to earthquakes. An earthquake (or seismic) engineer aims to construct structures that will not be damaged in minor shaking and will avoid serious damage or collapse in a major earthquake. Earthquake
Earthquake
engineering is the scientific field concerned with protecting society, the natural environment, and the man-made environment from earthquakes by limiting the seismic risk to socio-economically acceptable levels.[1] Traditionally, it has been narrowly defined as the study of the behavior of structures and geo-structures subject to seismic loading; it is considered as a subset of structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, applied physics, etc
[...More...]

"Earthquake Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Construction Engineering
Construction
Construction
Engineering is a professional discipline that deals with the designing, planning, construction, and management of infrastructures such as roads, tunnels, bridges, airports, railroads, facilities, buildings, dams, utilities and other projects. Construction
Construction
technology is a related field that deals more with the practical aspects of projects. Construction
Construction
technologists or construction technicians learn some of the design aspects similar to civil engineers and some of the project site management aspects similar to construction managers. These technicians are unique such that they are a cross between civil engineers and construction managers. At the educational level, civil engineering students concentrate primarily on the design work, which is more analytical, gearing them toward a career as a design professional
[...More...]

"Construction Engineering" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Marine Electronics
Marine electronics refers to electronics devices designed and classed for use in the marine environment on board ships and yachts where even small drops of salt water will destroy electronics devices
[...More...]

"Marine Electronics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Engine Room
On a ship, the engine room or ER is the propulsion machinery spaces of the vessel. To increase a vessel's safety and chances of surviving damage, the machinery necessary for operations may be segregated into various spaces. The engine room is generally the largest physical compartment of the machinery space. It houses the vessel's prime mover, usually some variations of a heat engine - diesel engine, gas or steam turbine, or some combination of these (such as CODAG; see Category: Marine Propulsion). On some ships, the machinery space may comprise more than one engine room, such as forward and aft, or port or starboard engine rooms, or may be simply numbered. On a large percentage of vessels, ships and boats, the engine room is located near the bottom, and at the rear, or aft, end of the vessel, and usually comprises few compartments
[...More...]

"Engine Room" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

List Of Maritime Colleges
This is a list of maritime colleges, grouped by country.Contents1 Africa1.1 Egypt 1.2 Ethiopia 1.3 Ghana 1.4 Mozambique 1.5 Nigeria 1.6 South Africa 1.7 Tanzania 1.8 Kenya2 The Americas2.1 Brazil 2.2 Canada 2.3 Ecuador 2.4 Jamaica 2.5 Mexico 2.6 Panama 2.7 Peru 2.8 Trinidad and Tobago 2.9 United States 2.10 Venezuela3 Asia3.1 Azerbaijan 3.2 Bahrain 3.3 Bangladesh3.3.1 The Department of Shipping-approved private institutes3.4 China3.4.1 Hong Kong3.5 India 3.6 Indonesia 3.7 Iran 3.8 Iraq 3.9 Israel 3.10 Japan 3.11 Jordan 3.12 Lebanon 3.13 Malaysia 3.14 Myanmar 3.15 Pakistan 3.16 Philippines 3.17 Republic of Korea 3.18 Saudi Arabia 3.19 Singapore 3.20 Sri Lanka 3.21 Taiwan 3.22 Thailand4 Europe4.1 Belgium 4.2 Bulgaria 4.3 Croatia 4.4 Denmark 4.5 Estonia 4.6 Finland 4.7 France 4.8 Georgia 4.9 Greece 4.10 Iceland 4.11 Ireland 4.12 Italy 4.13 Latvia 4.14 Lithuania 4.15 Malta 4.16 Montenegro 4.17 Nether
[...More...]

"List Of Maritime Colleges" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Galvanic Corrosion
Galvanic corrosion
Galvanic corrosion
(also called bimetallic corrosion) is an electrochemical process in which one metal corrodes preferentially when it is in electrical contact with another, in the presence of an electrolyte. A similar galvanic reaction is exploited in primary cells to generate a useful electrical voltage to power portable devices.Contents1 Overview 2 Examples of corrosion2.1 Statue of Liberty 2.2 Royal Navy and HMS Alarm 2.3 US Navy Littoral Combat Ship Independence 2.4 Corroding lighting fixtures 2.5 Lasagna
Lasagna
cell 2.6 Electrolytic cleaning3 Preventing galvanic corrosion 4 Galvanic series 5 Anodic index 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] Dissimilar metals and alloys have different electrode potentials, and when two or more come into contact in an electrolyte, one metal acts as anode and the other as cathode
[...More...]

"Galvanic Corrosion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ship Stability
Ship stability
Ship stability
is an area of naval architecture and ship design that deals with how a ship behaves at sea, both in still water and in waves, whether intact or damaged. Stability calculations focus on the center of gravity, center of buoyancy, and metacenter of vessels and on how these interact.Contents1 History 2 Add-on stability systems2.1 Passive systems2.1.1 Bilge keel 2.1.2 Outriggers 2.1.3 Antiroll tanks 2.1.4 Paravanes2.2 Active systems2.2.1 Stabilizer fins 2.2.2 Gyroscopic internal stabilizers3 Calculated stability conditions3.1 Intact stability 3.2 Damage stability (Stability in the damaged condition)4 Required stability 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]A model yacht being tested in the towing tank of Newcastle UniversityShip stability, as it pertains to naval architecture, has been taken into account for hundreds of years
[...More...]

"Ship Stability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Electrical Power Distribution
Electric power
Electric power
distribution is the final stage in the delivery of electric power; it carries electricity from the transmission system to individual consumers. Distribution substations connect to the transmission system and lower the transmission voltage to medium voltage ranging between 2 kV and 35 kV with the use of transformers.[1] Primary distribution lines carry this medium voltage power to distribution transformers located near the customer's premises. Distribution transformers again lower the voltage to the utilization voltage used by lighting, industrial equipment or household appliances. Often several customers are supplied from one transformer through secondary distribution lines. Commercial and residential customers are connected to the secondary distribution lines through service drops
[...More...]

"Electrical Power Distribution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Electrical Power Generation
Electricity generation
Electricity generation
is the process of generating electric power from sources of primary energy. For electric utilities in the electric power industry, it is the first stage in the delivery of electricity to end users, the other stages being transmission, distribution, energy storage and recovery, using pumped-storage methods. A characteristic of electricity is that it is not a primary energy freely present in nature in remarkable amounts and it must be produced. Production is carried out in power plants. Electricity is most often generated at a power station by electromechanical generators, primarily driven by heat engines fueled by combustion or nuclear fission but also by other means such as the kinetic energy of flowing water and wind
[...More...]

"Electrical Power Generation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anchor
An anchor is a device, normally made of metal, used to connect a vessel to the bed of a body of water to prevent the craft from drifting due to wind or current. The word derives from Latin
Latin
ancora, which itself comes from the Greek ἄγκυρα (ankura).[1][2] Anchors can either be temporary or permanent. Permanent anchors are used in the creation of a mooring, and are rarely moved; a specialist service is normally needed to move or maintain them
[...More...]

"Anchor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Oil Platform
An oil platform, offshore platform, or offshore drilling is a mechanical process where a wellbore is drilled below the seabed using a large structure with facilities for well drilling to explore, extract, store, process petroleum and natural gas which lies in rock formations beneath the seabed. In many cases, the platform contains facilities to house the workforce as well. Most commonly, the term is used to describe drilling activities on the continental shelf, though the term can also be applied to drilling in lakes, inshore waters and inland seas. Depending on the circumstances,[1] the platform may be fixed to the ocean floor, may consist of an artificial island, or may float. Remote subsea wells may also be connected to a platform by flow lines and by umbilical connections
[...More...]

"Oil Platform" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.