HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Marcus Garvey
Marcus Mosiah Garvey Jr. ONH (17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940)[1] was a proponent of Black nationalism in the United States and most importantly Jamaica.[2] He was a leader of a mass movement called Pan-Africanism
Pan-Africanism
and he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).[2][3] He also founded the Black Star Line, a shipping and passenger line which promoted the return of the African diaspora
African diaspora
to their ancestral lands. Although most American Black leaders condemned his methods and his support for racial segregation, Garvey attracted a large following. The Black Star Line
Black Star Line
went bankrupt and Garvey was imprisoned for mail fraud in the selling of its stock
[...More...]

picture info

Afro-Asian
Official global population numbers are unknown. United States: 185,595 (2010)[Americas-US 1]Regions with significant populations Afro-Asians
Afro-Asians
or African-Asians (also sometimes Blasians or Black Asians) are persons of mixed African and Asian ancestry.[1] Historically, Afro-Asian
Afro-Asian
populations have been marginalized as a result of human migration and social conflict
[...More...]

African Philosophy
African philosophy is philosophy produced by African people, philosophy that presents African worldviews, or philosophy that uses distinct African philosophical methods.[1] African philosophers may be found in the various academic fields of philosophy, such as metaphysics, epistemology, moral philosophy, and political philosophy.Contents1 Definition 2 Types 3 Pre-modern3.1 North Africa3.1.1 Christian 3.1.2 Islamic3.2 West Africa3.2.1 Islamic3.3 Horn of Africa 3.4 Southern Africa 3.5 Central Africa 3.6 African Diaspora4 Modern4.1 Ethnophilosophy and philosop
[...More...]

picture info

George Padmore
George Padmore
George Padmore
(28 June 1903 – 23 September 1959), born Malcolm Ivan Meredith Nurse in Trinidad, was a leading Pan-Africanist, journalist, and author. He left Trinidad
Trinidad
in 1924 to study medicine in the United States, where he also joined the Communist Party. From there he moved to the Soviet Union, where he was active in the party, and working on African independence movements. He also worked for the party in Germany but left after the rise of the Nazis in the 1930s. He left the Communist Party in 1934 because of the abuses and widespread purges under Stalinism. He continued to support socialism. Padmore lived for a time in France, before settling in London
[...More...]

picture info

Robert Mugabe
Robert Gabriel Mugabe (/mʊˈɡɑːbi/;[1] Shona: [muɡaɓe]; born 21 February 1924) is a Zimbabwean revolutionary and politician. He served as Prime Minister of Zimbabwe
Prime Minister of Zimbabwe
from 1980 to 1987 and then as President from 1987 to 2017. He chaired the Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe
African National Union (ZANU) group from 1975 to 1980 and led its successor political party, the ZANU – Patriotic Front (ZANU–PF), from 1980 to 2017. Ideologically an African nationalist, during the 1970s and 1980s he identified as a Marxist–Leninist, although after the 1990s self-identified only as a socialist. His policies have been described as Mugabeism. Mugabe was born to a poor Shona family in Kutama, Southern Rhodesia. Following an education at Kutama College
Kutama College
and the University of Fort Hare, he worked as a school teacher in Southern Rhodesia, Northern Rhodesia
Rhodesia
and Ghana
[...More...]

picture info

Julius Malema
Julius Sello Malema (born 3 March 1981) is a Member of Parliament and the leader of the Economic Freedom Fighters, a radical leftist and racial nationalist[1][better source needed] South African political party, which he founded in July 2013.[2][3] He previously served as President of the African National Congress Youth League
African National Congress Youth League
from 2008 to 2012. Malema was a member of the ANC
ANC
until his expulsion from the party in April 2012. He occupies a notably controversial position in South African public and political life, having risen to prominence with his support for African National Congress
African National Congress
president, and later President of South Africa, Jacob Zuma
[...More...]

picture info

Félix Houphouët-Boigny
Félix Houphouët-Boigny
Félix Houphouët-Boigny
([feliks ufwɛ(t) bwaɲi];[1][2] 18 October 1905 – 7 December 1993), affectionately called Papa Houphouët or Le Vieux (The Old One), was the first President of Ivory Coast (1960 to 1993), serving for more than three decades until his death. A tribal chief, he worked as a medical aide, union leader, and planter before being elected to the French Parliament. He served in several ministerial positions within the French government before leading Côte d'Ivoire following independence in 1960. Throughout his life, he played a significant role in politics and the decolonization of Africa. Under Houphouët-Boigny's politically moderate leadership, Ivory Coast prospered economically
[...More...]

picture info

Yosef Ben-Jochannan
Yosef Alfredo Antonio Ben-Jochannan (/ˈbɛn ˈjoʊkənən/; December 31, 1918 – March 19, 2015), referred to by his admirers as "Dr. Ben", was an African American
African American
writer and historian
[...More...]

picture info

Ujamaa
Ujamaa
Ujamaa
('familyhood' in Swahili) was the concept that formed the basis of Julius Nyerere's social and economic development policies in Tanzania
Tanzania
after it gained independence from Britain in 1961.Contents1 History1.1 Ideology and practice 1.2 Decline and end2 In popular culture 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ideology and practice[edit] In 1967, President Nyerere published his development blueprint, which was titled the Arusha Declaration, in which Nyerere pointed out the need for an African model of development and that formed the basis of African socialism. The Swahili word ujamaa means 'extended family', 'brotherhood' or 'socialism'; as a political concept it asserts that a person becomes a person through the people or community
[...More...]

picture info

Third International Theory
The Third International Theory, also known as the Third Universal Theory (Arabic: نظرية عالمية ثالثة‎), was the style of government proposed by Col. Muammar Gaddafi
Muammar Gaddafi
in the early 1970s, on which his government, the Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, was officially based
[...More...]

Sankarism
Sankarism (also written Sankaraism[1]) is a term sometimes applied to denote a left-wing ideological trend within the political milieu of Burkina Faso, a landlocked country in West Africa, as well as the policies of the military government led by Captain Thomas Sankara. Sankara came to power in what was then the Republic of Upper Volta
Republic of Upper Volta
in a popularly-supported 1983 military c
[...More...]

picture info

Thomas Sankara
Thomas Isidore Noël Sankara (French pronunciation: ​[tɔma izidɔʁ nɔɛl sɑ̃kaʁa]; 21 December 1949 – 15 October 1987) was a Burkinabé military captain, Marxist revolutionary, pan-Africanist and President of Burkina Faso
Burkina Faso
from 1983 to 1987.[1][2] Viewed by supporters as a charismatic and iconic figure of revolution, he is commonly referred to as "Africa's Che Guevara".[1][3][4] Sankara seized power in a popularly-supported coup in 1983, aged just thirty-three, with the goal of eliminating corruption and the dominance of the former French colonial power.[1][5]
[...More...]

picture info

Mobutism
Mobutism, also called Mobutuism, was an official party ideology of the Popular Movement of the Revolution
Popular Movement of the Revolution
(Mouvement Populaire de la Revolution, MPR) as well as the official state ideology in Zaire
Zaire
(now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) during the latter half of the 20th century. Mobutism
Mobutism
encompassed and glorified the thoughts, visions, and policies of Zairian president and self-proclaimed "Father of the Nation," Mobutu Sese Seko
[...More...]

picture info

African Art
African art
African art
describes the modern and historical paintings, sculptures, installations, and other visual culture from native or indigenous Africans
Africans
and the African continent. The definition may also include the art of the native African, African diasporas, such as African American, Caribbean
Caribbean
and other American art. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.[1] Masquerade, metalwork, sculpture, architecture, fiber art, and dance are important art forms across Africa
Africa
and may be included in the study of African art. The term "African art" does not usually include the art of the North African areas along the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
coast, as such areas had long been part of different traditions
[...More...]

picture info

Africa
Africa
Africa
is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent (the first being Asia
Asia
in both categories). At about 30.3 million km2 (11.7 million square miles) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth's total surface area and 20% of its total land area.[3] With 1.2 billion[1] people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the north, both the Suez Canal and the Red Sea
Red Sea
along the Sinai Peninsula
Sinai Peninsula
to the northeast, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west. The continent includes Madagascar
Madagascar
and various archipelagos
[...More...]

picture info

London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
[...More...]

.