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Marching Band
A marching band is a group in which instrumental musicians perform while marching, often for entertainment or competition. Instrumentation typically includes brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments. Most marching bands wear a uniform, often of a military style, that includes an associated school or organization's colors, name or symbol. Most high school marching bands, and some college marching bands, are accompanied by a color guard, a group of performers who add a visual interpretation to the music through the use of props, most often flags and rifles. Marching
Marching
bands are generally categorized by function, size, age, gender, instrumentation, marching style, and type of show they perform. In addition to traditional parade performances, many marching bands also perform field shows at sporting events and at marching band competitions
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Boston University
Newbury Biblical Institute (1839–1847) Methodist
Methodist
General Biblical Institute (1847–1867) Boston
Boston
Theological Institute (1867–1869)Motto Learning, Virtue, Piety[1]Type Private, researchEstablished 1839[2][3]Endowment $1.96 billion (2017)[4]President Robert A
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Baroque Period
The Baroque
Baroque
(US: /bəˈroʊk/ or UK: /bəˈrɒk/) is a highly ornate and often extravagant style of architecture, art and music that flourished in Europe from the early 17th until the late 18th century. It followed the Renaissance style
Renaissance style
and preceded the Neoclassical style. It was encouraged by the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
as a means to counter the simplicity and austerity of Protestant
Protestant
architecture, art and music. The baroque style used contrast, movement, exuberant detail, grandeur and surprise to achieve a sense of awe. The style began in the first third of the 17th century in Rome, then spread rapidly to France, northern Italy, Spain and Portugal, then to Austria and southern Germany
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Competition
Competition
Competition
is, in general, a contest or rivalry between two or more entities, organisms, animals , individuals, economic groups or social groups, etc., for territory, a niche, for scarce resources, goods, for mates, for prestige, recognition, for awards, for group or social status, or for leadership and profit.[1] It arises whenever at least two parties strive for a goal which cannot be shared, where one's gain is the other's loss (a zero-sum game).[2] Competition
Competition
occurs naturally between living organisms which co-exist in the same environment.[3] For example, animals compete over water supplies, food, mates, and other biological resources
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Fight Song
In American and Canadian sports, a fight song is a song associated with a team. In both professional and amateur sports, fight songs are a popular way for fans to cheer for their team, and are also laden with history; in singing a fight song, fans feel part of a large, time-honored tradition.[1] Although the term "fight song" is primarily used in the United States, the use of fight songs is commonplace around the world, but they may also be referred to as team anthems, team songs or games songs in other countries, even such as Australia, Mexico
Mexico
and New Zealand. Fight songs differ from stadium anthems, used for similar purposes, in that they are usually written specifically for the purposes of the team, whereas stadium anthems are not. Hundreds of colleges have fight songs, some of which are over a century old. The oldest collegiate fight song in the United States is Boston College's "For Boston", composed by T.J
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Ancient Warfare
Ancient warfare
Ancient warfare
is war as conducted from the beginnings of recorded history to the end of the ancient period. In Europe
Europe
and the Near East, the end of antiquity is often equated with the Fall of Rome
Rome
in 476 AD, the wars of the Eastern Roman Empire
Empire
on its Southwestern Asian and North African borders, and the beginnings of the Muslim conquests
Muslim conquests
in the 7th century. In China, it can also be seen as ending with the growing role of mounted warriors needed to counter the ever-growing threat from the north in the 5th century and the beginning of the Tang Dynasty in 618. In India, the ancient period ends with the decline of the Gupta Empire
Gupta Empire
(6th century) and the beginning of the Muslim conquests there from the 8th century
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Carnyx
The carnyx was a wind instrument of the Iron Age
Iron Age
Celts, used between c. 200 BC and c. AD 200. It was a type of bronze trumpet with an elongated S shape, held so that the long straight central portion was vertical and the short mouthpiece end section and the much wider bell were horizontal in opposed directions. The bell was styled in the shape of an open-mouthed boar's, or other animal's, head. It was used in warfare, probably to incite troops to battle and intimidate opponents, as Polybius
Polybius
recounts
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University Of Chicago
The University
University
of Chicago
Chicago
(UChi, U of C, Chicago, or UChicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois. It holds top-ten positions in various national and international rankings.[9][10][11][12] The university is composed of the College, various graduate programs and interdisciplinary committees organized into five academic research divisions and seven professional schools. Beyond the arts and sciences, Chicago
Chicago
is also well known for its professional schools, which include the Pritzker School of Medicine, the Booth School of Business, the Law School, the School of Social Service Administration, the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, the Divinity School and the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies
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Evliya Çelebi
Mehmed Zilli (25 March 1611 – 1682), known as Evliya Çelebi (Ottoman Turkish: اوليا چلبى‎), was an Ottoman explorer who travelled through the territory of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
and neighboring lands over a period of forty years, recording his commentary in a travelogue called the Seyahatname ("Book of Travel").[1] The name Çelebi is an honorific title meaning gentleman (see pre-1934 Turkish naming conventions).Contents1 Life 2 Travels2.1 Mostar 2.2 Europe 2.3 Azerbaijan 2.4 Crimean Khanate 2.5 Parthenon 2.6 Syria
Syria
and Palestine3 The Seyâhatnâme 4 Popular culture 5 Bibliography5.1 In Turkish 5.2 In English 5.3 In German 5.4 In Italian6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Evliya Çelebi
Evliya Çelebi
was born in Constantinople
Constantinople
(now Istanbul) in 1611 to a wealthy family from Kütahya
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Brass Instrument
A brass instrument is a musical instrument that produces sound by sympathetic vibration of air in a tubular resonator in sympathy with the vibration of the player's lips. Brass instruments are also called labrosones, literally meaning "lip-vibrated instruments".[1] There are several factors involved in producing different pitches on a brass instrument. Slides, valves, crooks (though they are rarely used today), or keys are used to change vibratory length of tubing, thus changing the available harmonic series, while the player's embouchure, lip tension and air flow serve to select the specific harmonic produced from the available series. The view of most scholars (see organology) is that the term "brass instrument" should be defined by the way the sound is made, as above, and not by whether the instrument is actually made of brass
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Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
(UK: /ˌɪstænˈbʊl/, /-ˈbuːl/ or US: /-stɑːn-/ or /ˈɪstənˌbʊl/;[7][8][9] Turkish: İstanbul [isˈtɑnbuɫ] ( listen)), historically known as Constantinople
Constantinople
and Byzantium, is the most populous city in what is modern-day Turkey
Turkey
and the country's economic, cultural, and historic center. Istanbul
Istanbul
is a transcontinental city in Eurasia, straddling the Bosphorus
Bosphorus
strait (which separates Europe
Europe
and Asia) between the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Hautbois
PluckedAppalachian dulcimer (United States) Autoharp Baglama or Saz (Turkey) Bajo sexto (Mexico) Balalaika (Russia) Bandura (Ukraine) Bandurria Banjo (American) Barbat Begena (Ethiopia) Bordonua Bouzouki (Greece) Bugarija (Croatia) Cavaquinho (Portugal and Brazil) Çeng (Turkey) Charango (South America) Chitarrone Cittern Cuatro Cümbüş (Turkey) Đàn bầu (Vietnam) Đàn nguyệt (Vietnam) Đàn tranh (Vietnam) Đàn tỳ bà (Vietnam) Daruan (China) Diddley bow (United States) Dombra (East Europe and Middle Asia) Domra (Russia) Doshpuluur (Tuva) Dramyin Dutar Duxianqin (China) Electric bass Gayageum (Korea) Guitar Bass guitar Acoustic bass guitar Cigar box guitar Electric guitar Harp guitar Dobro (a.k.a
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
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American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
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