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Manorialism
Manorialism
Manorialism
was an essential element of feudal society.[1] It was the organizing principle of rural economy that originated in the Roman villa system of the Late Roman Empire,[2] and was widely practiced in medieval western and parts of central Europe
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Villa
A villa was originally an ancient Roman upper-class country house. Since its origins in the Roman villa, the idea and function of a villa have evolved considerably. After the fall of the Roman Republic, villas became small farming compounds, which were increasingly fortified in Late Antiquity, sometimes transferred to the Church for reuse as a monastery. Then they gradually re-evolved through the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
into elegant upper-class country homes
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Arab
Historically: Arabian mythology (Hubal · al-Lāt · Al-‘Uzzá · Manāt · Other Goddesses) Predominantly: Islam (Sunni · Shia · Sufi · Ibadi · Alawite · Ismaili) Sizable minority: Christianity (Eastern Orthodox · Maronite · Coptic Orthodox · Greek Orthodox · Greek Catholic · Chaldean Christian) Smaller minority: Other monotheistic religions (Druze · Bahá'í Faith · Sabianism · Bábism · Mandaeism)Related ethnic groupsOther Afroasiatic-speaking peoplesa Arab
Arab
ethnicity should not be confused with non- Arab
Arab
ethnicities that are also native to the Arab
Arab
world.[30] b Not all Arabs
Arabs
are Muslims
Muslims
and not all Muslims
Muslims
are Arabs
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Dominate
The Dominate
Dominate
or late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
was the "despotic" later phase of imperial government, following the earlier period known as the "Principate", in the ancient Roman Empire
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Factor Of Production
In economics, factors of production, resources, or inputs are what is used in the production process to produce output—that is, finished goods and services. The utilized amounts of the various inputs determine the quantity of output according to the relationship is called the production function. There are three basic resources or factors of production: land, labour and capital. The factors are also frequently labelled "producer goods or services" to distinguish them from the goods or services purchased by consumers, which are frequently labeled "consumer goods". All three of these are required in combination at a time to produce a commodity. There are two types of factors: primary and secondary. The previously mentioned primary factors are land, labour (the ability to work), and capital goods. Materials and energy are considered secondary factors in classical economics because they are obtained from land, labor and capital
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Colonus (person)
A colonus was a tenant farmer from the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and Early Middle Ages. Known plurally as coloni or colonate, these farmers were sharecroppers, who paid back landowners with a portion of their crops, in exchange for use of their farmlands. The coloni's tenant-landlord relationship eventually degraded into one of debt and dependence. As a result, the colonus became a new type of land tenancy, in which the occupants were placed in a state between freedom and slavery.Contents1 Decline 2 Taxation 3 Latifundia and estates 4 See also 5 Books 6 ReferencesDecline[edit] In Italy, much of the agricultural land was leased to tenants. There was a concept in place that allowed the tenants to have tenure on the land, even though they were not the owners. Tax liabilities went with the sales of a land plot, but most of the taxed public land in Italy was leased rather than owned
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Constantine I
Constantine the Great
Constantine the Great
(Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus;[2] Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD[1] – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine, in the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles,[3] was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian and Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD. He was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman Army
Roman Army
officer, and his consort Helena. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian
Diocletian
and Galerius
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Codex Theodosianus
The Codex Theodosianus
Codex Theodosianus
(Eng. Theodosian Code) was a compilation of the laws of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
under the Christian
Christian
emperors since 312. A commission was established by Theodosius II
Theodosius II
and his co-emperor Valentinian III
Valentinian III
on 26 March 429[1][2] and the compilation was published by a constitution of 15 February 438
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Theodosius II
Theodosius II
Theodosius II
(Latin: Flavius Theodosius Junior Augustus;[1] Greek: Θεοδόσιος Βʹ; 10 April 401 – 28 July 450),[2] commonly surnamed Theodosius the Younger,[3] or Theodosius the Calligrapher, was the Eastern Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
for most of his life, taking the throne as an infant in 402 and ruling as the Eastern Empire’s sole emperor after the death of his father Arcadius
Arcadius
in 408, until 450. He is mostly known for promulgating the Theodosian law code, and for the construction of the Theodosian Walls of Constantinople
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Mediterranean Sea
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
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Henri Pirenne
Henri Pirenne
Henri Pirenne
(French: [piʁɛn]; 23 December 1862 – 24 October 1935) was a Belgian
Belgian
historian. A medievalist of Walloon descent, he wrote a multivolume history of Belgium
Belgium
in French and became a national hero
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Petworth House
Petworth
Petworth
House in the parish of Petworth, West Sussex, England, is a late 17th-century Grade I listed country house, rebuilt in 1688 by Charles Seymour, 6th Duke of Somerset, and altered in the 1870s to the design of the architect Anthony Salvin.[2] It contains intricate wood-carvings by Grinling Gibbons
Grinling Gibbons
(d.1721). It is the manor house of the manor of Petworth. For centuries it was the southern home for the Percy family, Earls of Northumberland. Petworth
Petworth
is famous for its extensive art collection made by George Wyndham, 3rd Earl of Egremont (1751-1837), containing many works by his friend Turner
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Penshurst Place
Penshurst
Penshurst
Place is a historic building near Tonbridge, Kent, 32 miles (51 km) south east of London, England. It is the ancestral home of the Sidney family, and was the birthplace of the great Elizabethan poet, courtier and soldier, Sir Philip Sidney. The original medieval house is one of the most complete surviving examples of 14th-century domestic architecture in England. Part of the house and its gardens are open for public viewing
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Benefice
A benefice /ˈbɛnɪfɪs/ is a reward received in exchange for services rendered and as a retainer for future services. The Roman Empire used the Latin
Latin
term beneficium as a benefit to an individual from the Empire for services rendered. Its use was adopted by the Western Church
Western Church
in the Carolingian
Carolingian
Era as a benefit bestowed by the crown or church officials. A benefice specifically from a church is called a precaria (pl. precariae) such as a stipend and one from a monarch or nobleman is usually called a fief
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Charlemagne
Charlemagne
Charlemagne
(/ˈʃɑːrləmeɪn/) or Charles
Charles
the Great[a] (2 April 742[1][b] – 28 January 814), numbered Charles
Charles
I, was King of the Franks
Franks
from 768, King of the Lombards
Lombards
from 774 and Holy Roman Emperor from 800. He united much of western and central Europe during the early Middle Ages. He was the first recognised emperor to rule from western Europe since the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
three centuries earlier.[2] The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian
Carolingian
Empire
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Septimania
Septimania
Septimania
(French: Septimanie, IPA: [sɛptimani]; Occitan: Septimània, IPA: [septiˈmanjɔ]; Catalan: Septimània, IPA: [səptiˈmaniə]) was the western region of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis
Gallia Narbonensis
that passed under the control of the Visigoths
Visigoths
in 462, when Septimania
Septimania
was ceded to their king, Theodoric II. Under the Visigoths
Visigoths
it was known as simply Gallia or Narbonensis. It corresponded roughly with the former administrative region of Languedoc-Roussillon
Languedoc-Roussillon
of modern France
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