HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Manfredonia
Manfredonia
Manfredonia
[maɱfreˈdɔːnja] is a town and comune of Apulia, Italy, in the province of Foggia, from which it is 35 kilometres (22 miles) northeast by rail. Manfredonia
Manfredonia
is situated on the coast, facing east, to the south of Monte Gargano, and gives its name to the gulf to the east of it. As of 2011[update] its population was 57,416.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Main sights 4 Transport 5 Demographics 6 Personalities 7 See also 8 Gallery 9 References and sources 10 External linksHistory[edit] The area of current Manfredonia
Manfredonia
was settled in ancient times by the Greeks, founded by Diomedes. The flourishing Greek colony, having fallen into the hands of the Samnites, was retaken about 335 BC by King Alexander of Epirus, uncle of Alexander the Great. In 189 BC Sipontum was conquered by the Romans and became a colony of citizens
[...More...]

"Manfredonia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romanesque Architecture
Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is an architectural style of medieval Europe characterized by semi-circular arches. There is no consensus for the beginning date of the Romanesque style, with proposals ranging from the 6th to the 11th century, this later date being the most commonly held. It developed in the 12th century into the Gothic style, marked by pointed arches. Examples of Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
can be found across the continent, making it the first pan-European architectural style since Imperial Roman architecture. The Romanesque style in England is traditionally referred to as Norman architecture. Combining features of ancient Roman and Byzantine buildings and other local traditions, Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is known by its massive quality, thick walls, round arches, sturdy pillars, barrel vaults, large towers and decorative arcading
[...More...]

"Romanesque Architecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Argyrus (Catepan Of Italy)
Argyrus (or Argyros; c. 1000–1068) was a Lombard nobleman and Byzantine general, son of the Lombard hero Melus. He was born in Bari. Upon the defeat of Melus, who had rebelled against the Byzantines, at the battle of Cannae in 1018, Argyrus and his mother were captured and taken to Constantinople
Constantinople
as prisoners. He was out of confinement by 1038, when he returned to Apulia, then in an uproar over being pressed into service during the Byzantine invasion of Sicily. The Lombard troops returned with their Norman and Varangian
Varangian
comrades in 1039, alienated by General George Maniaches. In 1040, the Lombards
Lombards
of southern Italy revolted against their Greek overlords, with the support of Norman mercenaries, and slew the catepan Nikephoros Dokeianos. In March, the rebels scored a first victory, against the new catepan, Michael Dokeianos, near the Olivento
[...More...]

"Argyrus (Catepan Of Italy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alexander The Great
Alexander
Alexander
III of Macedon
Macedon
(20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander
Alexander
the Great (Ancient Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, translit. Aléxandros ho Mégas, Koine
Koine
Greek: [a.lék.san.dros ho mé.gas]), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon[a] and a member of the Argead
Argead
dynasty. He was born in Pella
Pella
in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II to the throne at the age of twenty
[...More...]

"Alexander The Great" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Arpi
Arpi, Argyrippa, or Argos Hippium was an ancient city of Apulia, Italy, 20 mi. W. of the sea coast, and 5 mi. N. of the modern Foggia. The legend attributes its foundation to Diomedes, and the figure of a horse, which appears on its coins, shows the importance of horse-breeding in early times in the district. Its territory extended to the sea, and Strabo
Strabo
says that from the extent of the city walls one could gather that it had once been one of the greatest cities of Italy. As a protection against the Samnites, Arpi became an ally of Rome.[1] In the war with Pyrrhus, the Arpani aided Rome
Rome
with a contingent of 4000 foot and 400 horse.[2] Arpi remained faithful to Rome
Rome
until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae, but the consul Quintus Fabius Maximus, son of the famous Roman dictator Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus, captured it in 213 B.C., and it never recovered its former importance
[...More...]

"Arpi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Comune
The comune (IPA: [koˈmune]; plural: comuni, IPA: [koˈmuni]) is a basic administrative division in Italy, roughly equivalent to a township or municipality.Contents1 Importance and function 2 Subdivisions 3 Homonymy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksImportance and function[edit] The comune provides many of the basic civil functions: registry of births and deaths, registry of deeds, and contracting for local roads and public works. It is headed by a mayor (sindaco) assisted by a legislative body, the consiglio comunale (communal council), and an executive body, the giunta comunale (communal committee). The mayor and members of the consiglio comunale are elected together by resident citizens: the coalition of the elected mayor (who needs an absolute majority in the first or second round of voting) gains three fifths of the consiglio's seats
[...More...]

"Comune" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Aequum Tuticum
Ariano Irpino (formerly Ariano di Puglia or simply Ariano) is an Italian town and municipality in the province of Avellino, in the Campania region. With a population of 22,535 (2017)[1] it is the second-largest town of the Irpinia district and of the province, with Avellino itself being the largest.Contents1 Geography1.1 Overview 1.2 Surroundings2 History 3 Culture3.1 Majolica 3.2 Museums 3.3 Research activity 3.4 Food 3.5 In popular culture4 People 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit]The public gardenOverview[edit] At an elevation of 778 metres (2,552 ft) above sea level, Ariano Irpino is centred between the Adriatic Sea and the Tyrrhenian Sea. It is 39 km east of Benevento, 51 km north-east of Avellino and 62 km south-west of Foggia. Formerly called just Ariano, it was built on three hills, and for that reason it is also known as Città del Tricolle (City of the Three Knolls)
[...More...]

"Aequum Tuticum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Benevento
Benevento
Benevento
[beneˈvɛnto]  listen (help·info) (Neapolitan: Beneviento) is a city and comune of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Benevento, 50 kilometres (31 mi) northeast of Naples. It is situated on a hill 130 metres (427 feet) above sea level at the confluence of the Calore Irpino
Calore Irpino
(or Beneventano) and the Sabato. It is also the seat of a Roman Catholic archbishop. Around Benevento
Benevento
there is an urban area with 110,000 inhabitants. Benevento
Benevento
occupies the site of the ancient Beneventum, originally Maleventum or still earlier Maloenton. The "-vent" portion of the name probably refers to a market-place and is a common element in ancient place names.[1] The Romans theorized that it meant "the site of bad events", from Mal(um) + eventum
[...More...]

"Benevento" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Via Appia
The Appian
Appian
Way ( Latin
Latin
and Italian: Via Appia) was one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads
Roman roads
of the ancient republic. It connected Rome
Rome
to Brindisi, in southeast Italy.[1] Its importance is indicated by its common name, recorded by Statius:[2][3]Appia longarum..
[...More...]

"Via Appia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Italo-Normans
The Italo-Normans, or Siculo- Normans
Normans
when referring to Sicily
Sicily
and Southern Italy, are the Italian-born descendants of the first Norman conquerors to travel to southern Italy
Italy
in the first half of the eleventh century. While maintaining much of their distinctly Norman piety and customs of war, they were shaped by the diversity of southern Italy, by the cultures and customs of the Greeks, Lombards, and Arabs
Arabs
in Sicily.Contents1 History 2 Italo-Norman
Italo-Norman
families 3 Further reading 4 Notes 5 See alsoHistory[edit] Normans
Normans
first arrived in Italy
Italy
as pilgrims probably either on their way or returning from Rome
Rome
or Jerusalem
Jerusalem
also visiting the shrine at Monte Gargano in the late tenth and early eleventh century
[...More...]

"Italo-Normans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Countship Of Apulia
The County of Apulia and Calabria, later the Duchy of Apulia and Calabria, was a Norman country founded by William of Hauteville in 1042 in the territories of Gargano, Capitanata, Apulia, Campania, and Vulture. It became a duchy when Robert Guiscard was raised to the rank of duke by Pope Nicholas II in 1059. The duchy was disestablished in 1130 when the last duke of Apulia and Calabria, Roger II of Sicily became King of Sicily. The title of duke was thereafter used intermittently as a title for the heir apparent to the Kingdom of Sicily.Contents1 Creation 2 List of counts and dukes 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCreation[edit] William I of Hauteville, who returned in September 1042 in Melfi, was recognized by all the Normans as supreme leader. He turned to Guaimar IV, Lombard, Prince of Salerno, and Rainulf Drengot, Count of Aversa, and offered both an alliance
[...More...]

"Countship Of Apulia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diomedes
Diomedes
Diomedes
(/ˌdaɪəˈmiːdiːz/ or /ˌdaɪˈɒmɪdiːz/[1]) or Diomede (/ˈdaɪəmiːd/;[2] Greek: Διομήδης Diomēdēs 'God-like cunning, advised by Zeus') is a hero in Greek mythology, known for his participation in the Trojan War. He was born to Tydeus
Tydeus
and Deipyle and later became King of Argos, succeeding his maternal grandfather, Adrastus. In Homer's Iliad Diomedes
Diomedes
is regarded alongside Ajax as one of the best warriors of all the Achaeans (behind only Achilles
Achilles
in prowess). Later, he founded ten or more Italian cities
[...More...]

"Diomedes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Water Stagnation
Water
Water
stagnation occurs when water stops flowing. Stagnant water can be a major environmental hazard.[1]Contents1 Dangers 2 Life that may thrive in stagnant water2.1 Fish 2.2 Insects 2.3 Other3 See also 4 ReferencesDangers[edit] Malaria
Malaria
and dengue are among the main dangers of stagnant water, which can become a breeding ground for the mosquitoes that transmit these diseases.[2] Stagnant water can be dangerous for drinking because it provides a better incubator than running water for many kinds of bacteria and parasites. Stagnant water is often contaminated with human and animal feces, particularly in deserts or other areas of low rain.[2] Stagnant water may be classified into the following basic, although overlapping, types: Water
Water
body stagnation (stagnation in swamp, lake, lagoon, river, etc.) Surface and ground waters stagnation Trapped water stagnation
[...More...]

"Water Stagnation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Capetian House Of Anjou
The Capetian House of Anjou
Anjou
was a royal house and cadet branch of the direct French House of Capet, part of the Capetian dynasty. It is one of three separate royal houses referred to as Angevin, meaning "from Anjou" in France. Founded by Charles I of Naples, the youngest son of Louis VIII of France, the Capetian king first ruled the Kingdom of Sicily
Sicily
during the 13th century. Later the War of the Sicilian Vespers forced him out of the island of Sicily, leaving him with the southern half of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
— the Kingdom of Naples
[...More...]

"Capetian House Of Anjou" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kingdom Of Sicily
the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
(1194–1254) (also with the Kingdom of Jerusalem: 1225–1228) the Crown of Aragon
Crown of Aragon
(1412–1516) the
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Sicily" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Odet De Foix, Vicomte De Lautrec
Odet de Foix, Vicomte de Lautrec
Lautrec
(1485 – 15 August 1528) was a French military leader. He gained the reputation of a gallant and able soldier, but this scarcely seems to be justified by the facts, although he was always badly used by fortune. The branch of the Viscounts of Lautrec
Lautrec
originated with Pierre, the son of John III of Foix; Pierre's elder brother was Gaston IV of Foix. He married Charlotte d'Albret (1495–1527) in 1520 and had several children:Gaston (1522–28) Henry (1523–40) Claude (d.1549) Francis (d.1528)Odet de Foix and his two brothers, the seigneur de Lescun and the seigneur de l'Esparre or Asparros, served Francis I of France
France
as captains; and the influence of their sister, Françoise de Châteaubriant, who became the king's mistress, gained them high office
[...More...]

"Odet De Foix, Vicomte De Lautrec" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.